Cubs

The professional: Bobby Scales fights for his place

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The professional: Bobby Scales fights for his place

Sunday, March 13, 2011Posted: 5:25 p.m. Updated: 8:20 p.m.

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. If things had worked out differently, maybe Bobby Scales would have spent this weekend in Japan, trying to contact concerned friends and family to assure them that he was all right.

The haunting images flashed on a flat-screen TV almost directly above Scales locker on Friday in the Cubs clubhouse. Players, team personnel and reporters silently watched CNNs coverage of the earthquake and tsunami that could push the death toll past 10,000. That morning, Scales received confirmation from Micah Hoffpauir that he was safe.

I dont care who you are, where youre from, what language you speak thats awful, Scales said. What (else) can you say about it?

Every player has a small window to maximize his earning power and support his family. Hoffpauir who appeared in 162 games with the Cubs across the past three seasons is trying to capitalize with the Nippon Ham Fighters. At the age of 33, Scales cant ignore the possibility of playing abroad.

Absolutely, Scales said. If I was given the opportunity, I would love to have gone (to Japan). Their process is very intricate and they do a lot of homework on guys they bring over, so apparently I didnt pass the test.

But Scales isnt the type to wonder what could have been. The Cubs think so highly of him that they would like to hire him for their front office as soon as he retires. Hes not ready to play along with that idea just yet. A utility guy likes to be appreciated, but not taken for granted.

Its a flattering thing to say, Scales said. Its good that people think of you as a good baseball guy and an intelligent person and someone that they would like to work with in the future. (But) Im still a player and I still want to play and I still feel like I can help a team win games. Until that changes, thats my (mindset).

Scales went to the University of Michigan and cant wait to watch ESPNs Fab Five documentary. Its not hard to get him talking college basketball. But he doesnt want to be a Cinderella story.

It took Scales 11 seasons and more than 1,000 games in the minors before he made his big-league debut in 2009.

Hes hitting .438 this spring, and has put on a show for the players brought over from the minor-league complex for a split-squad weekend. In two games, he went 4-for-8 with two RBI and three runs scored. He helped turn five double plays on Sunday as a second baseman.

Its encouraging for the young guys, said Cubs bench coach Pat Listach, who once managed Scales at Triple-A Iowa. (They) see a guy who didnt get to the big leagues until he was over 30 and is still fighting and battling.

These guys have got to take notice of it and say, Hey, we need to work just like that. This guys in his 30s and still doing it.

Jay Jackson, a 23-year-old pitcher, credits Scales for showing him how to manage his time and demonstrating the way you should act in the clubhouse, essentially what it takes to be a professional.

Bobbys kind of taken me under his wing, Jackson said. I couldnt ask for any better teachers than I had last year, with him and Micah Hoffpauir at Triple-A. It was a blast, just picking up little things here and there. If when I do make it, Ill know the proper way to do things.

Cubs executives also notice those leadership traits. Again Scales is working on a minor-league deal. He gets why the media tries to find some deeper meaning to it all. But the way he sees it, he still has a great job and a supportive wife. Why wouldnt he be here?

I know how old I am everybody knows how old I am, Scales said. But Im very fortunate to stay away from injury. Im of the mind that youre as young as you tell yourself you are. Age is nothing but a number. Ive been smart enough to keep myself in shape.

If it doesnt work out here, then hopefully it will work out somewhere else.

PatrickMooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Texas Rangers hire Cubs' Shiraz Rehman to be assistant GM

Texas Rangers hire Cubs' Shiraz Rehman to be assistant GM

The changing of the guard continues for the Cubs this offseason. 

After the team hired a new hitting coach yesterday, it was reported today that they're losing a front office member: 

Rehman, who has been with the Cubs in the same position for the last seven years, will reportedly head up the Rangers' analytics department. According to the Chicago Tribune, Rehman's role was " evaluating existing systems, and recognizing and applying solutions in an effort to create competitive advantages for the organization." 

All reports indicate that he'll be doing similar analytic-based work with the Rangers. 

Chili Davis after being ousted by Cubs: 'There were multiple players in there I didn't connect with'

Chili Davis after being ousted by Cubs: 'There were multiple players in there I didn't connect with'

Chili Davis didn't go all scorched earth on the Cubs in a recent interview with the Chicago Sun-Times, but he had quite a lot to say after being ousted by the organization after just one year as the hitting coach.

The Cubs made Davis the scapegoat for an offense that faded down the stretch, struggling for the entire second half and scoring just 1 run in three of the final four games of the year.

When he was hired a year ago, Theo Epstein and Joe Maddon talked up Davis' impressive resume that includes a 19-year MLB career, two separate stints as a successful hitting coach with the Oakland A's and Boston Red Sox and a philosophy that they hoped would withstand the test of time in the game today, preaching more contact and using the opposite field.

Throughout the 2018 season, Maddon often commended Davis for his ability to communicate with players, particularly in the area of mental approach to each at-bat.

Now that the dust has settled a bit on his firing, Davis felt he had some issues getting through to some Cubs players.

I learned a lot this year," Davis told the Sun-Times' Gordon Wittenmyer. "I learned that the next situation I get in, before I say yes to a job, I need to make sure I know the personnel I'll be dealing with in the clubhouse. I hope the next guy connects better with the players, because I felt that there were multiple players there I didn't connect with. It wasn't that I didn't try; it just wasn't there.

The Cubs hired Anthony Iapoce as their new hitting coach Monday afternoon. Iapoce comes over from the Rangers and has a direct link to John Mallee, who was the Cubs' hitting coach for three seasons before being let go when Davis became available last winter. 

Iapoce also spent three seasons with the Cubs as a special assistant to the GM, overseeing the organization's minor-league hitting from 2013-15. Presumably, he found a way over those years to connect with the Cubs' top young hitting prospects — guys like Kris Bryant and Kyle Schwarber and Willson Contreras that are now leading the big-league lineup.

Hopefully he has better success at this than I did," Davis said of Iapoce in the Sun-Times article. "But regardless of who's there, certain players there are going to have to make some adjustments because the game's changed and pitchers are pitching them differently. They're not pitching to launch angles and fly balls and all that anymore. They're pitching away from that. They're going to have to make that adjustment whether I'm there or not.

Davis had a whole lot more to say on the matter and I encourage you to read the full interview with Wittenmyer over at ChicagoSunTimes.com.

A healthy Bryant very likely could've changed everything for Davis and the Cubs' 2018 lineup. Contreras hitting like he's capable of in the second half would've made a huge difference, as well.

But the end result is a finish to the 2018 campaign that was viewed universally as a disappointment — particularly in the offensive department — and the Cubs are left with their third different hitting coach in three seasons.