Cubs

Quade acts like he doesnt feel the heat

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Quade acts like he doesnt feel the heat

Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011Posted: 12:45 p.m. Updated: 5:30 p.m.

By PatrickMooney
CSNChicago.com CubsInsider Follow @CSNMooney
Mike Quade presented himself as someone who likes to take a moment. Hed scan the rooftops, soak in the scene and reflect on the long journey that brought him here.

But as reporters poked around on Wednesday for quotes to use in their obituaries for this lost season, the Cubs manager wouldnt play along with the line of questioning. Quade refused to get sentimental and admit that this could be his final game at Wrigley Field.

Dont think about it. Dont believe it. Lets play ball, Quade said. Im going to be back. Why would I look at it any other way?

The calculus certainly changed when Jim Hendry got fired. The people who work with Quade watched the press conference. They noticed that chairman Tom Ricketts didnt endorse the coaching staff the way he did others in the front office, saying those decisions would be up to the next general manager.

A new administration is about to come into power at Clark and Addison. That executive will be free to hire his own manager.

Nothing I can do about that, Quade said. I dont see any reason to look at it any other way. Im not going to wax nostalgic. I plan to be back. And I plan to do a good job next year.

Quade hasnt spoken with Ricketts about his job status yet, though the chairman was spotted in the clubhouse walking toward the managers office after Wednesdays 7-1 victory over the Brewers.

If they make a decision in a different direction, so be it, Quade said.

Quade is eternally optimistic. Thats how he beat the long odds and rose to this position. Thats why he says things like Im not a lunatic and announces that the Cubs are still in the playoff hunt, even when theyre 18 games under .500.

It seems hard to believe that less than a year ago Quade rode the momentum of a 24-13 finish and landed his dream job. A baseball lifer who spent so much time in the shadows suddenly became the story.

The Prospect High School graduate had moved all over the world to advance his career, coaching 19 seasons in the minors and managing winter ball in the Dominican Republic.

This time, Quade was given pieces that didnt quite fit together, aging veterans who were getting paid for past performance and young players who didnt show the progress the organization promised.

The Cubs have played hard and maintained a sense of professionalism through a difficult season. But the public perception of Quades authority seemed to erode on July 9, when Ryan Dempster got into a shouting match with his manager in the dugout.

All this came at a time when the Cubs were trying to cycle off bad contracts and frame their next window of opportunity. They have too many tickets to sell to publicly call it a bridge year. But they also didnt think that theyd lose around 90 games and finish in fifth place again.

I look at this as a variety of things, Quade said. No one escapes blame and you understand that. But I also look at it as a realist and try and think about the things that I could or couldnt control.

The Cubs couldnt overcome the injuries to Randy Wells and Andrew Cashner during the first week of the season. There went 40 percent of a rotation that didnt live up to expectations. What was supposed to be a shutdown bullpen has blown 23 saves.

Quade also promised to drive home fundamentals, insisting that the Cubs would play the game the right way. They woke up on Wednesday leading the majors with 128 errors.

Thats one disappointment, Quade said. But it wasnt for lack (of) concentration or emphasis on it from the beginning of spring training. So you go back to the drawing board and you look at (why).

Thats the most frustrating thing. If its something that we neglected, then, yeah, the hell with me. When youre working on it and talking about it every day. What else can we say or do?

Those are the kinds of questions the next general manager will be asking.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Cubs aren’t trading Yu Darvish this winter, despite reported inquiries

Cubs aren’t trading Yu Darvish this winter, despite reported inquiries

Whether the Cubs trade a member of their position player core this winter — i.e. Kris Bryant, Willson Contreras — is to be determined. Both have been fixtures in rumors this offseason, and the Cubs may make a deal to replenish their barren farm system and retool their roster with the organization’s long-term stability in mind.

Yu Darvish, on the other hand, is a different story.

No, the Cubs won’t be trading Darvish this winter, despite the inquiries they received at the Winter Meetings this week, according to Joel Sherman of the New York Post.

A year ago, this would be an entirely different conversation. Darvish was coming off a disappointing debut season on the North Side in which he made eight starts and posted a 4.95 ERA in 40 innings. He didn’t throw a single big-league pitch after May 20 due to a lingering arm issue that led to surgery last November.

2019 was only Year 2 of the lucrative six-year contract Darvish signed in February 2018. But between the injury and his struggles before it that season, the narrative entering 2019 was shifting towards Darvish being a potential bust.

The narrative around Darvish is obviously much different now, thanks to the stellar second half performance he put together last season. In 13 starts, the 33-year-old delivered a 2.76 ERA, striking out 118 batters compared to a mere seven walks in 81 2/3 innings.

Not only was Darvish walking the walk, but he was talking the talk. He was determined to turn things around after posting a 5.01 ERA in the first half, asking then manager Joe Maddon to start the Cubs’ first game after the All-Star break. The result? Six innings of two-hit, no-run ball with eight strikeouts and one walk. Darvish's comeback was officially on.

Bust? Darvish is far from it now. He opted in to the remaining four years of his contract earlier this offseason, calling the Cubs "perfect" for him.

If the Cubs were entering a rebuild, fielding Darvish trade offers would make plenty of sense. He's owed $81 million through 2023, a bargain compared to the deals Gerrit Cole (nine years, $324 million — Yankees) and Stephen Strasburg (seven years, $245 million — Nationals) earned this offseason. Darvish's contract is desirable, and trading him would help alleviate the Cubs' notoriously tight payroll situation, freeing up money for them to put towards other needs.

But the Cubs aren’t rebuilding, and trading Darvish would create a tremendous hole in a rotation with plenty of uncertainty after next season. José Quintana is set to hit free agency after 2020 and Jon Lester could join him, if his 2021 option doesn’t vest (he must pitch 200 innings next season for that to occur). Heck, even Tyler Chatwood's deal is up after 2020.

In one season, Darvish has elevated himself to the No. 1 pitcher in the Cubs rotation. The Cubs won't be better next season if they trade Bryant or Contreras, but they'd still be competitive and acquire assets for the future.

One player doesn't make a team in baseball, but the Cubs need Darvish in their rotation, not someone else's. Unless they're absolutely blown away by a trade offer, Darvish isn't going anywhere.

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Sports Talk Live Podcast: MLB 2019 Winter Meetings come to an end

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NBC Sports Chicago

Sports Talk Live Podcast: MLB 2019 Winter Meetings come to an end

SportsTalk Live is on location in San Diego for the final day of the MLB Winter Meetings.

0:00- Chuck Garfien, Tony Andracki and Vinnie Duber join Kap to recap the Winter Meetings. Tony was right-- the Cubs didn't make a move. Plus, should the White Sox have done more in San Diego?

12:00- Legendary baseball writer Peter Gammons joins Kap and Chuck. The talk about the price for pitching and what the Cubs might do with Kris Bryant. Plus, Gammons talks about a text he received saying the White Sox were talking with the Red Sox about Andrew Benintendi and David Price. Would that make sense for the Southsiders?

20:00- White Sox World Series winning closer Bobby Jenks joins Kap to discuss his emotional article in The Players Tribune. They discuss his injuries with the Red Sox, the back surgery that almost cost him his life and then his downward spiral into addiction.

Listen here or via the embedded player below:

Sports Talk Live Podcast

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