The San Diego Padres have some validation.

According to FOXSports' Ken Rosenthal, Major League Baseball told both the Cubs and Padres that Anthony Rizzo's controversial slide at home plate Monday night was illegal.

Rule 7.13, also known as the Posey Rule, was enacted in 2014 to limit contact at home plate.

While attempting to score on Kris Bryant's lineout to center field in the sixth inning Monday, Rizzo plowed into Padres catcher Austin Hedges, who had to leave the game with a bruised thigh. Here's the play again:

Hedges held on to the ball, so Rizzo was out anyways. Had Hedges dropped the ball, the umpires could've gone to video replay to rule Rizzo out and Padres manager Andy Green could have challenged if need be.

According to Rosenthal, Joe Torre and MLB are determining whether or not Rizzo will face any sort of repercussions for the contact at home plate, but the league has yet to suspend any player for violating the rule.

Here is the complete summary for Rule 7.13:

1. A runner attempting to score may not deviate from his direct pathway to the plate in order to initiate contact with the catcher (or other player covering home plate). If, in the judgment of the Umpire, a runner attempting to score initiates contact with the catcher (or other player covering home plate) in such a manner, the Umpire shall declare the runner out (even if the player covering home plate loses possession of the ball). In such circumstances, the Umpire shall call the ball dead, and all other base runners shall return to the last base touched at the time of the collision.

 

Rule 7.13 Comment: The failure by the runner to make an effort to touch the plate, the runner's lowering of the shoulder, or the runner's pushing through with his hands, elbows or arms, would support a determination that the runner deviated from the pathway in order to initiate contact with the catcher in violation of Rule 7.13. If the runner slides into the plate in an appropriate manner, he shall not be adjudged to have violated Rule 7.13. A slide shall be deemed appropriate, in the case of a feet first slide, if the runner's buttocks and legs should hit the ground before contact with the catcher. In the case of a head first slide, a runner shall be deemed to have slid appropriately if his body should hit the ground before contact with the catcher.

2. Unless the catcher is in possession of the ball, the catcher cannot block the pathway of the runner as he is attempting to score. If, in the judgment of the Umpire, the catcher without possession of the ball blocks the pathway of the runner, the Umpire shall call or signal the runner safe. Notwithstanding the above, it shall not be considered a violation of this Rule 7.13 if the catcher blocks the pathway of the runner in order to field a throw, and the Umpire determines that the catcher could not have fielded the ball without blocking the pathway of the runner and that contact with the runner was unavoidable. 

Rizzo said he has talked to umpires about the play and believes his slide was within the rules.

Green called it a "cheap shot" Monday evening.