Cubs

Sandberg, Trammell wont be part of Cubs staff

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Sandberg, Trammell wont be part of Cubs staff

Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2010
Updated 8:26 PM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

In one week the Cubs will gather for their organizational meetings in Arizona, where chairman Tom Ricketts and Ernie Banks have been lobbying Mesa voters to support the Nov. 2 ballot measure that could secure their new spring-training facility.

As the Cubs map out the offseason, its unclear where another franchise icon fits into their future. There isnt room on the major-league staff for Ryne Sandberg, who would be welcomed back as the manager at Triple-A Iowa or could be given a position within the front office.

Mike Quades staff has taken shape and there wont be many changes. Alan Trammell the Cubs bench coach the past four seasons agreed Tuesday to take the same job with Kirk Gibson and the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Otherwise third- and first-base coaches Ivan DeJesus and Bob Dernier and bullpen coach Lester Strode have been invited back and are expected to return next year.

Pitching coach Larry Rothschild already exercised his option for next season, while hitting coach Rudy Jaramillo is signed through 2012.

If Sandberg had been named manager, Quade wouldnt have remained on the Hall of Famers staff. The Cubs viewed that pairing as a huge potential distraction.

Special assistant Matt Sinatro who was particularly close to Lou Piniella after working 15 seasons with him in Seattle, Tampa Bay and Chicago will not return to the Cubs.

Trammell, an upbeat presence in the clubhouse, was considered someone who balanced out Piniella, and he will probably do the same in reuniting with Gibson. The 52-year-old Trammell has been friends with Gibson for almost his entire adult life.

They were teammates for 12 seasons in Detroit and won the 1984 World Series together. When Trammell managed the Tigers, Gibson served as his bench coach. Ultimately, Trammell was fired in 2005 by the only team hed ever really known after 300 losses in three seasons.

Trammell rebuilt his resume in Chicago he scripted the practice plans in spring training and could be seen working almost daily with rookie shortstop Starlin Castro and filled in for Piniella when the manager took his leaves of absence.

Arguably the biggest surprise on Aug. 22 was not Piniellas resignation amid family concerns, but that Quade would be taking over for the final 37 games.

By then, general manager Jim Hendry had decided that Trammell an excellent coach who always conducted himself with class wasnt a serious managerial candidate. Hendry knew it would be unfair to tell Trammell that on the last weekend of the season.

Given all the background work Hendry had to do while searching for Piniellas successor, he probably has a few names in mind for the special assistant and bench coach roles, though Major League Baseball strongly discourages teams from making announcements during the World Series.

Quade who was formally reintroduced as the Cubs manager last week often deflected credit for the teams 24-13 finish to his coaches. Quade maintained a good relationship with Trammell and said he wanted to keep the entire staff intact.

But Trammell goes farther back with Gibson, who was elevated to interim manager in July and told hed remain on the job at seasons end. Trammell and Gibson were given an impossible rebuilding project in Detroit and eventually had to leave the organization they were so closely identified with.

After four years managing in the minor-league system, that could be the way for Sandberg to advance his career, though so far no other team has asked the Cubs for permission to interview him.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

A series to forget: Facts and figures from Cubs' rough weekend in Cincinnati

A series to forget: Facts and figures from Cubs' rough weekend in Cincinnati

The Cubs and their fans may want to invent and use one of those Men In Black neuralyzers because the four-game series in Cincinnati was one to forget.

The Reds finished off a four-game sweep of the Cubs on Sunday with an 8-6 win. The way the Reds won the finale will be especially painful for the Cubs considering they led 6-1 after six innings. Mike Montgomery appeared to tire in the seventh inning and Pedro Strop got rocked out of the bullpen to lead to a seven-run seventh for the hosts.

The Reds have now won seven in a row and 10 of 12, but still sit 13 games under .500. Bizarrely, the Reds also swept the Dodgers, the Cubs’ next opponent, in a four-game series in May. Duane Underwood will start for the Cubs Monday against the Dodgers and make his major league debut.

Here are some other wild facts and figures from the series:

  • The last time the Reds swept the Cubs in a four-game series was back in 1983. That was the first week of the season and three weeks before the infamous Lee Elia rant.
  • One positive for the Cubs from the game was Montgomery’s start. Through six innings he allowed one run on three hits and two walks. However, he gave up a single, a double and a single in the seventh before Strop relieved him. Montgomery had gone six innings and allowed one run in each of his last four outings.
  • Strop was definitely a negative. On his first pitch, Strop gave up a home run to pinch-hitter Jesse Winker, the second home run for a Reds pinch-hitter in the game. Then Strop allowed a single, a walk, a single and a double before getting an out. Strop’s final line: 2/3 inning pitched, four runs, one strikeout, three walks, four hits.
  • The Cubs led in three of the four games this series, including two leads after five innings.
  • The Cubs were 5-for-23 (.217) with runners in scoring position in the series. On the season the Cubs are hitting .233 with RISP, which is 22nd in the majors and fourth-worst in the National League (but ahead of the division-rival Brewers and Cardinals).
  • The Reds outscored the Cubs 31-13 and scored at least six runs in every game. The Reds are now 6-3 against the Cubs this year after going a combined 17-40 against the Cubs from 2015-2017.

Summer of Sammy: Sosa's 32nd homer in 1998

Summer of Sammy: Sosa's 32nd homer in 1998

It's the 20th anniversary of the Summer of Sammy, when Sosa and Mark McGwire went toe-to-toe in one of the most exciting seasons in American sports history chasing after Roger Maris' home run record. All year, we're going to go homer-by-homer on Sosa's 66 longballs, with highlights and info about each. Enjoy.

Sosa victimized the Tigers pitching staff again on the next night, taking Brian Moehler deep in the 7th inning for a 400-foot solo blast.

The homer tied the game at 3, but the Cubs blew the lead in the bottom of the 7th when the Terrys (Adams and Mulholland) gave up 3 runs. The Cubs wound up losing 6-4.

The Cubs were putting together a really nice season in 1998 that ended with a trip to October. They entered the series with the Tigers with a 42-34 record, yet lost both games to a Detroit team that entered the series with a 28-45 record. The Tigers finished the season 65-94; the Cubs finished 90-73.

Fun fact: Luis Gonzalez was the Tigers left fielder and No. 5 hitter for both games of the series. He spent part of the 1995 season and all of '96 on Chicago's North Side. 1998 was his only year in Detroit before he moved on to Arizona, where he hit 57 homers in 2001 and helped the Diamondbacks to a World Series championship with that famous broken-bat single in Game 7.

Fun fact  No. 2: Remember Pedro Valdes? He only had a cup of coffee with the Cubs (9 games in 1996 and 14 in '98), but started in left field on June 25, 1998. He walked and went 0-for-1 before being removed from the game for a pinch-hitter (Jose Hernandez).