Cubs

What can the Cubs learn from the Giants?

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What can the Cubs learn from the Giants?

Tuesday, March 1, 2011
8:00 PM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. It was 71 degrees here at first pitch, and from behind home plate you get a postcard view of the mountains. The San Francisco Giants are still celebrating their first World Series title in 56 years, and theres no better time to imagine the possibilities.

The Giants did it with pitching and defense and just enough offense, the brand of baseball the Cubs are trying to build on Mike Quades watch.

Maybe the Cubs will eventually fit that vision. But after Tuesdays 3-2 win over the Giants at Scottsdale Stadium, theyve committed nine errors through their first three Cactus League games.

Quades going to start cutting off fingers one at a time, pitcher Ryan Dempster joked. You better start making plays or youre not going to have a glove hand.

There are several takeaways from the Giants run to the World Series that you can apply to the Cubs.

They drafted and developed high-end starters like Tim Lincecum and Matt Cain. They assembled a deep and versatile bullpen that was among the National Leagues best. They thrived without getting many returns on Barry Zitos seven-year, 126 million deal, showing that huge long-term contracts dont have to be crippling.

They did it when no one expected.

Pitching and defense is how you win championships, Dempster said. Anybody sees it as motivation. You dont have to be picked on somebodys preseason board to be the World Series champ.

San Francisco also finished with a fielding percentage (.988) that was tied for best in the majors. The Cubs committed 53 more errors than the Giants in 2010 and graded out as one of the leagues worst defensive teams. But its still too early for the manager to panic.

Get them out of the way now, Quade said. If I start raising hell after Game 1, first of all, it goes against who I am. And second of all, I dont know if you can lose 60 guys at once, (but) its possible.

The Giants came together at the right time. They spent only 37 days in first place last year, and lost 515 games of manpower to the disabled list. They needed the Cubs to win three of four games in San Diego during the final week of the season. They finished two games ahead of the Padres in the National League West.

Ex-Cubs Mike Fontenot and Mark DeRosa will soon be getting World Series rings.

Im still waiting for that bottle of champagne, Dempster said. Its crazy when you think about it.

So much can happen between now and October. Dempster went three innings on Tuesday and is feeling good. Todd Wellemeyer, who was released by the Giants last August and watched them on TV back home in Kentucky, threw two scoreless innings.

Wellemeyer thinks he might get his ring in April. Hes a non-roster invitee who figures: If these guys dont have a spot for me, maybe one of the other teams will.

Those are decisions for another day. On a gorgeous day in Scottsdale, the Cubs were reminded of the Giants, and how the Green Bay Packers didnt need to win their division to win the Super Bowl.

Its such a thin (line), Quade said. You just got to get in the tournament and then you dont know. Things fell into place for them. Its a good lesson for all of us.

Theres plenty of reasons to look around and say, Why not us?

PatrickMooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Willson Contreras, expert at going viral, tells hilarious profanity-laced story from 2019

Willson Contreras, expert at going viral, tells hilarious profanity-laced story from 2019

Willson Contreras and viral moments at Cubs Convention go hand-in-hand.

At the team’s annual fan festival in 2018, Contreras stole the show with a story from the 2017 season. During a mound visit against the Cardinals, the Cubs catcher gave profanity-laced advice to Jon Lester, the Cubs starter who rarely throws pickoffs due to a serious case of the yips.

"I went out there and I said, 'Hey motherf--ker, throw the f--king ball to first,'” Contreras recalled in January 2018.

Contreras stole the show again Saturday, telling a story about a moment against the Cardinals — this time from the 2019 season.

“So last year, we were facing the Cardinals and I started talking to [Marcell] Ozuna,” Contreras said. “He told me ‘Just call a fastball right down the middle.’ [And I said] ‘Yeah okay, I will.’ Then I called the fastball and he took it.

“I told him ‘What the f— are you talking about? Just hit the ball, just hit it.’

“He asked me ‘Just call it again.’ And I did it. He took it. Swing the [bat]. I called a third pitch and it was a strikeout. And then next time it was like just ‘Shut up,” or something."

Warning: graphic language

How Contreras will top this at 2021 Cubs Convention is uncertain, but considering he now has two viral moments on his resume, we can be sure the next one will be just as amazing.

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Cubs announce plans for extended protective netting at Wrigley Field for 2020

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USA TODAY

Cubs announce plans for extended protective netting at Wrigley Field for 2020

Baseball fans will be more protected than ever at Wrigley Field this season.

Saturday, Cubs president of business operations Crane Kenney announced the club is extending protective netting at Wrigley Field to the elbows of the ballpark. Essentially, it will stretch a bit past where the old on-field bullpens were and stop before the walls in the left and right field corners.

Kenney added the extensions will be ready by Opening Day.

Last month, MLB commissioner Rob Manfred announced all 30 ballparks will extend their netting for the 2020 season. Manfred didn’t specify which teams would do what, but he said netting at each stadium would extend “substantially beyond the end of the dugout.”

With pitchers throwing harder than ever and batter exit velocities are through the roof, fans have little time to react in the stands when a ball is launched their way. It’s nearly impossible to avoid getting hit, even for those paying attention.

The Cubs have experienced this firsthand. In a game against the Astros last season, an Albert Almora Jr. foul ball struck a 2-year-old at Minute Maid Park. That young girl has a permanent brain injury, her family’s attorney announced earlier this month, an injury that affects her body similar to how a stroke would.

Almora was visibly shaken after the incident and said Friday at Cubs Convention it weighed heavily on him for the first couple of days.

“After that I had no other choice but to move forward,” Almora said. “But I always have that in the back of my mind. Every update that does come up, I am on there and I am seeing all of this."

Almora said he’s tried reaching out to the family but is respecting their privacy. As a father of two himself, he said there’s no reason to even think of his sons getting hurt while attending a game.

“Obviously prayers go out to the family. It’s unfortunate, and like I said before, that should never happen on a baseball field."

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