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Years from now, what will Wrigley look like?

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Years from now, what will Wrigley look like?

Tuesday, Nov. 16, 2010
Updated 10:22 PM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

Wrigley Field is supposed to feel timeless, though the building cant last forever. There is steel and concrete at Clark and Addison, and sketches and spreadsheets surrounding future projects.

What will Wrigley Field look like by 2014? Approaching its 100th anniversary, no one can really give a definitive answer, but everyone will have opinions.

Chairman Tom Ricketts isnt certain how long the Cubs can continue just patching up Wrigley Field each offseason without a comprehensive plan for renovation. But he also doesnt see that point in the future where it becomes too costly to remain at the stadium.

Ricketts wants to make sure that the ballpark is there for another 50 years. The Cubs dont want you to call it a mall, but here are some of the Triangle Building elements under consideration: hotel; restaurants; concessions; baseball museum; merchandise shop; parking garage; and television studio.

A renovated Wrigley Field would include a new retail and entertainment complex adjacent to the stadium. (Illustrations courtesy of the Cubs.)As outlined Tuesday by team president Crane Kenney, it would include a retractable roof over the space between Wrigley Field and the new facility, which has already spent years on the drawing board.

The development just west of the stadium, shaped by the streets at Clark and Waveland is central to the argument being made by the Ricketts family. The Cubs gathered local labor and business leaders at a news conference Tuesday hoping to frame it.

The Cubs estimate their stadium renovation plan which calls for the state to float 200 million in bonds and the Ricketts family to match 200 million more in private investment around the neighborhood will create 1,000 construction jobs and hundreds more permanent jobs.

Their research firm projects millions more in annual sales tax and property-tax revenues for local government, as well as a 66 million boost each year in regional tourism. Their message is that the economic activity generated by a reinvestment back into Wrigley Field will more than offset the money paid by fans buying Cubs tickets taken from the amusement-tax pool.

The plans unveiling came at a time when the mayor is about to retire (Richard M. Daley) and the governor was just narrowly elected (Pat Quinn) and the state could soon be facing a 15 billion budget deficit.

Ricketts will continue briefing political aides and is open-minded about alternative measures. But he said that the Cubs are not considering personal seat licenses as a way to raise funds.

Ultimately, we have to work with the state to come to some sort of conclusion that works (and guarantees the bonds), Ricketts said. The increasing amusement-tax revenues should support the bonds pretty well. To go to the markets, we might need a state agency to issue them for us, so we have to keep working with the state to come to that final answer.

The citys other professional teams have benefited from government involvement but the concept of committing future revenues at this moment to the Cubs and not schools, hospitals, and police and fire departments has been criticized extensively online and in editorials.

Ricketts who limited his comments to reporters last season but has been on a media tour the past several days will keep trying to change public perception.

The Illinois Sports Facilities Authority operates U.S. Cellular Field, while the Chicago Park District owns Soldier Field. But the Cubs are using historic Fenway Park with its space limitations and Yawkey Way pedestrian area as a model.

The Cubs estimate that they devote less than half the total square footage to baseball operations (14,515) that other teams use at new stadiums (30,000). Kenney explained that engineers are studying ways to build new clubhouses underneath the field, as well as add battings tunnels and training rooms during a gradual process over several offseasons.

The first year you would dig this out, (put) in a slurry wall (and) cover it back up and play, Kenney said, pointing to an area in left field. The next year you would re-excavate it and youd put a concrete floor and ceiling on it and then cover it up. (As) theyre playing on top of it, youre building out all of this stuff underneath.

The Cubs need to move their administrative offices and storage space and make room for food preparation. There are concepts for rooftop patios throughout the second deck, like the one that currently sits at the front of the building.

Ricketts is a co-founder of Incapital LLC, a securities and investment banking firm that has grown into one of the countrys largest bond underwriterstraders. He said that this wasnt the plan all along as his family explored buying the team and the stadium and a stake in Comcast SportsNet from Tribune Co.

Its a strategy crafted after a first year of ownership spent studying the teams operations. The essential idea is that the bricks-and-ivy views wont change. But once you leave your seat, youll get the modern conveniences found everywhere else. With three million fans a year, the threat of moving isnt credible.

Thats not an option for the Ricketts family at this point, the chairman said. Were staying at Wrigley Field. Were doing everything we can to preserve it.

The proposal to upgrade Wrigley Field and its surroundings calls for wider concourses and rooftop patios throughout the second deck. (Illustrations courtesy of the Cubs.)

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Cubs chairman Tom Rickets gave David Ross the coolest decoration for his office

Cubs chairman Tom Rickets gave David Ross the coolest decoration for his office

There are cool office decorations, and their office decorations that blow casual ones out of the water.

A souvenir in Cubs manager David Ross' Wrigley Field falls into the latter category.

Ross posted photos on Instagram Saturday revealing he has the first W flag to hang over Wrigley after the Cubs won the 2016 World Series in his office. He says team chairman Tom Ricketts gave it to him for the office.

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Now, imagine what that flag would go for on eBay.

All jokes aside, you've got to think that flag will end up in some Cubs museum one day. For now, it's in safe hands.

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2020 MLB season: Tracking players who have opted out or declined to play

2020 MLB season: Tracking players who have opted out or declined to play

With Major League Baseball attempting to play the 2020 season with COVID-19 afflicting the nation, players have the option to not participate this year. 

Those considered “high-risk” for the coronavirus — per MLB’s agreement with the MLBPA — can opt out and receive salary and service time. Those who are not can decline to play but may not receive salary and service time. Teams may offer both to players who live with high-risk individuals, however.

Here is a running list of players who will sit out this season:

Mike Leake — Diamondbacks pitcher

On June 29, Leake became the first player to announce he will sit out. His agent said he and his family took “countless factors into consideration.” MLB insider Jon Heyman said the right-hander will not be paid this season, meaning he doesn’t fall under the high-risk designation.

Leake was positioned to compete for a spot in Arizona’s rotation and will become a free agent if they decline his $18 million 2021 option.


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Nationals first baseman Ryan Zimmerman and pitcher Joe Ross 

Zimmerman joined Leake in announcing his decision on June 29. The longtime National cited family circumstances — three kids, including a newborn, and his mother being high-risk. He made it clear he is not retiring, but he's set to become a free agent after this season.

On the same day Zimmerman announced his decision, the Nationals revealed Ross also decided not to play. The club’s statement cited “the personal health and safety of themselves and their loved ones” in both players’ decisions. Ross is arbitration eligible through 2021.


Rockies outfielder Ian Desmond

Desmond also revealed he won’t play this year on June 29. He posted a powerful Instagram message discussing racial inequality in baseball, from Little League to MLB. It’s heartfelt and worth a read:

View this post on Instagram

On my mind.

A post shared by Ian Desmond (@i_dez20) on


Free agent pitcher Tyson Ross 

On July 2, Heyman reported Ross joined his brother Joe in deciding not to play. Tyson Ross was with the Giants and in contention for a swingman job before San Francisco released him in late June, shortly after MLB lifted its transaction freeze.


Nationals catcher Welington Castillo

Castillo became the third Nationals player to decide to sit out. Nationals manager Dave Martinez said on July 3 the former Cubs and White Sox catcher was hesitant to play because he has young children.


Dodgers pitcher David Price

Price announced on July 4 he will be sitting out this year, saying it’s in the “best interest of my health and my family’s health.” He joined Los Angeles over the offseason in a trade from the Red Sox with Mookie Betts.

Prior to his decision, Price donated $1,000 to every Dodgers minor leaguer in June.


Braves pitcher Félix Hernández

Hernández' agent announced on July 4 the former Cy Young Award winner will sit out this year. Hernández was vying for a spot in Atlanta’s rotation. 


Braves outfielder Nick Markakis

Markakis announced his decision to sit out on July 6. He said his family, as well as teammate Freddie Freeman contracting a rough case of COVID-19, influenced his thinking.

“Just to hear him, the way he sounded on the phone, it was tough, it was kind of eye-opening,” Markakis said of Freeman.


Pirates pitcher Héctor Noesí

The Pirates revealed on July 8 Noesí elected not to play for family reasons. He was on a minor league deal.


Giants catcher Buster Posey

Posey, the Giants longtime backstop and three-time champion, revealed Friday he won’t be playing this year. The 33-year-old and his wife recently adopted premature twin girls.

White Sox pitcher Michael Kopech

The White Sox announced Friday evening Kopech will not play this year. The 24-year-old hadn’t arrived at Summer Camp due to personal reasons prior to Friday’s news.

MORE: White Sox pitcher Michael Kopech decides not to participate in 2020 season

"Michael Kopech has informed us of his decision to not participate in the 2020 season," White Sox general manager Rick Hahn said in a statement. "We recognize that reaching this decision is incredibly difficult for any competitive athlete, and our organization is understanding and supportive.

"We will work with Michael to assure his development continues throughout 2020, and we look forward to welcoming him back into our clubhouse for the 2021 season."

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