Cubs

Young Cubs outfielders making an impression

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Young Cubs outfielders making an impression

By Jason P. Skoda
CSNChicago.com contributor

MESA, Ariz. The Cubs outfield is for the over 30 crowd.

Alfonso Soriano is 36, David DeJesus is 32 and Marlon Byrd is 35. The fourth outfielder is slated be Reed Johnson and he is 35.

All have produced in the past, but have shown signs of wear and tear in recent years.
Enter Brett Jackson, 23, Matt Szczur, 22 and even Tony Campana, 25.

Any slip ups, injuries or maybe even a shakeup of the clubhouse after a bad couple of weeks and the youngsters just might be ready to take over.

While Campana, who had two hits on Sunday in a 7-5 10-inning loss to the White Sox at HoHoKam Stadium, made his major-league debut last season, Jackson, as everyone knows, is the next big thing at Wrigley Field.

When you see him in person, its been pretty impressive, every part of his game, Cubs manager Dale Sveum said earlier this week. He comes to play every game. He comes to kick the other teams butt. Theres no doubt about it. A very aggressive, confident kid whos probably going to end up playing here a long time.

The feeling is the current contingent of outfielders are far from done otherwise there would be more of a push to keep Jackson on the roster on Opening Day.

Byrd has lost a ton of weight and is gliding better in the outfield, DeJesus just signed a two-year, 10-million deal this offseason and Soriano has lessened his leg kick and seemingly found a groove this spring at the plate.

"The other day, Brett Jackson was hitting a ball down the line and pushing into second," Byrd told the Chicago Tribune. "The next time I get up, I'm like, 'All right, he hit it down the line. I'm doing the same thing.' These kids can play, and that's the exciting thing."
Sveum, of course, feels that way after taking over the top spot in the Cubs dugout this season with the expectation of being around long enough to benefit from the young talent down the line.

I dont see why he wouldnt be ready, he said of Jackson. Maybe just develop the last part of his game as a little bit better two-strike hitter and not putting himself in some of those counts with swinging and missing. As far as the ability or anything, I dont see what else has to happen.

Szczur, who will start the season at Double-A Tennessee after spending 2011 in Single-A Peoria and Daytona, is still getting at-bats because of a strong of split-squad games despite getting sent down.

Its a huge honor to still be here, Szczur said after going 0-for-3 on Sunday. When I am up here, getting one at-bat here or one at-bat there its hard but it is still a chance to show them something.

Bench coach Jamie Quirk said the extra look is vital for a young player like Szczur.
Its great for the young guys to get four or five at-bats, said Quirk, who managed in Arizona while Sveum was in Las Vegas. Its mental toughness. They get to keep playing and show their skills. Anytime they can show their skills it is a plus.

Szczur said the idea of playing with Jackson, who is hitting .318 with a home run and five RBIs in 22 at-bats, in the confines of Wrigley someday has crossed his mind, but he is more focused on the present day.

We just go out there and play, said Szczur, who is hitting .158 in 19 spring at-bats. It is exciting to see us out there together. Were having fun. I have to worry about the day-by-day for now but I am excited to see what happens.

Notes: The Cubs will play a B game Monday against the Indians at Goodyear with right-hander Randy Wells getting the start. Right-hander Chris Volstad had another solid outing, giving up one earned (his first of the spring), in four innings against Texas in Las Vegas. He allowed four hits and struck out three. The crowd of 12,469 was the second largest of the spring for the Cubs after getting 13,245 on Friday.

Yu Darvish makes history, but Cubs lose crucial game

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AP

Yu Darvish makes history, but Cubs lose crucial game

Things didn't get off to a great start for Yu Darvish Tuesday night at Wrigley Field, but he managed to right the ship quickly.

After allowing three of the first four batters of the game to score, Darvish struck out 10 of the next 12 Reds that strolled to the plate.

That included a stretch of eight Reds in a row, which set a new Cubs franchise record:

Darvish and Kyle Schwarber (3 hits, 2 RBI) were the only bright spots on the night for the Cubs as they dropped a crucial game 4-2. The Cardinals also lost, so the Cubs didn't lose any ground in the division, but Milwaukee won, meaning the Brewers are now tied with the Cubs for the final playoff spot in the National League.

Darvish finished with 13 strikeouts in 7 innings Tuesday night, but gave up all 4 Reds runs.

It makes back-to-back incredible performances from the veteran in the whiff department, as he has 27 strikeouts over his last two starts — second-best in Cubs history:

As the Cubs make their push toward October, Darvish has been right up there with Kyle Hendricks as the most reliable members of the rotation. 

Given the way last year went and his slow start to 2019, the Cubs could not have asked for more from Darvish in the second half of the season while also pitching through some forearm tightness. Since the All-Star Break, the 33-year-old right-hander has a 2.70 ERA, 0.80 WHIP and 106 strikeouts against only 7 walks in 73.1 innings.

His performance has been especially huge since veterans Cole Hamels and Jon Lester have struggled to find consistency over the last couple months.

"We're seeing the real version of [Darvish] as a person, not just as a baseball player," Cubs pitching coach Tommy Hottovy said before Tuesday's game. "I think the comfortability level of him with everybody — the media, the coaching staff, the city, every aspect of it has played into it. 

"When he's in a good place and he's mentally feeling good and physically feeling good and he's comfortable, the sky's the limit with him and what he can do. He's got the freedom here to be more of himself in that we don't put a lot of restrictions on him and what he wants to do. As long as we kinda have the same focus and same goals, we're all on the same team. 

"I feel like he's getting to the point now where he's himself. You see that every time out. He's an ultra competitor; he's an uber planner. His routines are outstanding. He's just ready to go out there and dominate every time he gets the ball."

Cubs hoping reinforcements coming soon in Craig Kimbrel, Brandon Kintzler

Cubs hoping reinforcements coming soon in Craig Kimbrel, Brandon Kintzler

With the biggest series of the season looming later this week, the Cubs still don't know if they'll have two of their top relievers available out of the bullpen.

The position player group is already without its two most important players (Anthony Rizzo, Javy Baez) and the pitching staff has also taken a hit recently with Craig Kimbrel (right elbow) and Brandon Kintzler (left oblique) unavailable. 

Kimbrel hasn't pitched since serving up a 3-run homer to Christian Yelich on Sept. 1. He later went on the injured list with right elbow inflammation, but initially hoped to be back after the minimum 10-day stay. The best case scenario now would be Kimbrel returning a week beyond his original target date.

He threw a 16-pitch simulated game/live bullpen Tuesday afternoon at Wrigley Field and the Cubs will see how he feels Wednesday before determining the next step. He could either throw another live bullpen session or, if he feels good, return to the active roster and be available for Thursday's series opener with the division-leading St. Louis Cardinals.

"He looked really good, actually," Joe Maddon said. "Delivery was good. There was no hesitation with his arm. He wasn't guarding whatsoever. I thought the fastball was alive. Maybe the command of the curveball was off a bit, but the break was there. It was very encouraging."

Cubs pitching coach Tommy Hottovy also liked what he saw from Kimbrel, and felt the Cubs closer wasn't trying to overcompensate with his lower half and messing up his mechanics. 

As Hottovy stressed, the key will be in Wednesday's evaluation, when Kimbrel is able to come out to the field and play catch and see how his elbow recovers after the live action. 

This is already the second injury for Kimbrel, who didn't make his season debut until June 27 and then missed a couple weeks in early August with a knee issue. 

When he's been able to pitch, Kimbrel has 13 saves in 15 chances to go along with a 5.68 ERA and 1.53 WHIP. This is a guy who has never posted a season ERA over 3.40 or WHIP over 1.21 in his nine-year career.

The swing-and-miss stuff has been there (26 strikeouts in 19 innings), but he's also given up 6 homers so far. Between the free agent process that delayed his start to the season and the pair of injuries, Kimbrel really hasn't been able to settle into a groove in his first season with the Cubs.

"I think the best version of him is still in there," Hottovy said. "I think he'd be the first one to agree with that. But again, an 85-90 percent version of him is as good as anybody. [The key is] getting him to where he feels good, is comfortable and we're able to continue to work on things with him.

"This little stretch here gave us some time to clean up some mechanical things we wanted to do that you may not be able to do midseason when he's throwing three of four days or things like that. We were able to do a lot over this time and hopefully be back into it."

As for Kintzler, he hasn't pitched since last Tuesday in San Diego while dealing with his minor side injury. 

He played catch Tuesday and the Cubs will try to get him off the mound in a bullpen again over the next couple days. Once the symptoms subside and he feels like he can get back into his proper mechanics without pain, the team feels he should be able to pitch in game action.

The rest of the bullpen has been coming up huge for the Cubs — they have an NL-best 2.32 ERA in September — even without two of the top arms. That's thanks to the emergence of Rowan Wick, Brad Wieck and Kyle Ryan, plus veterans David Phelps, Tyler Chatwood and Steve Cishek.

But like Hottovy said, if getting Kimbrel or Kintzler back at only 85 percent would still help the team and with an expanded roster, the Cubs can get away with giving either veteran extra time off after outings.

With the Cubs squaring off against the Cardinals in seven of the final 10 games beginning Thursday, they would certainly like to have Kimbrel and Kintzler available for as many of those contests as they can.

"A lot of it is the communication with how are they feeling? If you rush them back and they pitch one game and then they're down for four days, is that better than them taking two or three extra days at the front end and then being able to regularly pitch like they normally could?" Hottovy said. "That's what we're trying to balance. 

"Right now, we have a little bit more flexibility. If we didn't want Kimbrel to throw another live BP, we can ease him into it because we have the Wi(e)cks, we have Phelps and Chatwood and those guys. We have more numbers down there. So you can pitch him one day and know he's gonna have a few days off potentially to have some coverage.

"We balance all that out and the biggest thing is getting the guys comfortable where they know if they go out on the mound, they can execute. That's the No. 1 thing. Once they can do that and they feel strong and they're recovering well, then I think we'll be ready to roll them out."