White Sox

2015 in review: How top White Sox prospects fared in minors

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2015 in review: How top White Sox prospects fared in minors

The White Sox haven’t had the 2015 season everyone dreamed of and with the team officially eliminated from the playoffs, it’s time to look ahead. 

While the South Siders may make a few additions in the offseason via free agency or trade, their farm system has developed some talent this year that could influence future moves.

Let’s take a look at how some of the top prospects in the system, according to MLBPipeline.com, did in 2015. 

[NBC SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]

1. Tim Anderson, SS (Class-AA: .312 BA, 5 HR, 46 RBI, 49 SB)

It’s no secret Anderson has been a prospect the White Sox have wanted to hold on to. Anderson took the next step in Birmingham this year, posting his best stats in the minor leagues so far. His display of speed on the base paths should be especially enticing for the White Sox front office, considering nobody on the major league team has over 17 stolen bases on the year. The only flaw Anderson still needs to work on, however, is his fielding as he posted only a .952 fielding percentage this year in Double-A. 

2. Carson Fulmer, P (Class-A+: 22 IP, 2.05 ERA, 25 K)

The No. 8 overall pick in this year’s draft didn’t get a lot of innings in the farm system this year but he certainly made the most of them. The right-hander was very effective at Winston-Salem, posting a 10.2 K/9. Fulmer is heading to the White Sox instructional league this fall and has continued to impress coaches despite his stature. Will he follow in Carlos Rodon’s footsteps? It’s too early to tell but Fulmer is certainly handling the transition from college well. 

3. Frankie Montas, P (Class-AA: 5-5, 112 IP, 2.97 ERA, 108 K)

Montas has already made the jump to the majors thanks to September call-ups. His first start with the White Sox didn’t go well, but his stuff has still been impressing his teammates. Montas provides the White Sox a nice, flexible option considering his electric stuff that could work well out of the bullpen but also his valuable experience as a starter. How the White Sox will use him in the future remains to be seen but Montas’ stuff makes him a piece of the puzzle going forward. 

4. Spencer Adams, P (Class-A: 9-5, 100 IP, 3.24 ERA, 73 K)

Adams, who was drafted out of high school in the 2014 MLB Draft, seems to be settling in nicely in the minor leagues. His solid numbers in Single-A speak for itself but when promoted to Winston-Salem, Adams continued his success, going 3-0 in 29.1 innings of work with a 2.15 ERA. He’s not ready for major-league work yet but the arrow continues to point up for Adams. 

5. Micah Johnson, 2B (Class-AAA: .315, 8 HR, 36 RBI, 28 SB) 

Johnson can hit. That’s never been any question about that. It’s always been about how he does in the field that’s prevented him from becoming a key component of the White Sox future. With the offense struggling as much as it is, it’s hard to see the White Sox keeping him in the minors. The question now becomes can he improve his defense and beat out Carlos Sanchez for the starting second baseman spot. 

6. Trey Michalczewski, 3B (Class-A+: .259 BA, 7 HR, 75 RBI)

Drafted out of high school in the 2013 MLB Draft, Michalczewski showed he can be a run producer in the minors with his RBI total. His power doesn’t leap out to anyone, especially with a .395 slugging percentage and his defense will need to improve (.934 percent). He’s still raw considering he’s only 20 but 2016 is a big year to show the White Sox front office if he’s someone they can count on in the future. 

7. Tyler Danish, P (Class-AA: 8-12, 4.50 ERA, 142 IP, 90 K)

2015 wasn’t extremely kind to Danish as he had a rough time with the Birmingham Barons. The right-hander posted his worst ERA in the minors since being drafted in 2013. One bad year isn’t a legitimate reason to panic over a prospect, but the team will need to see a bounce back year from Danish in order to count on him in the future. 

8. Micker Adolofo, OF (Rookie League: .253 BA, 0 HR, 10 RBI)

Adolfo fractured his fibula over the summer and will miss some time. He’s expected to be back by spring training. Adolfo’s still very young and the White Sox like his potential, but he’s going to need to get healthy before the team can really evaluate him going forward. 

9. Courtney Hawkins, OF (Class-AA: .243 BA, 9 HR, 41 RBI)

Things just haven’t clicked for Hawkins since being drafted in the first round by the White Sox in the 2012 MLB Draft. His powers numbers dropped off this year from 19 home runs to nine and just hasn’t been the same since his promising first year in the minors. It’s safe to wonder if Hawkins has become a bust. 

10. Jacob May, OF (Class-AA: .275 BA, 2 HR, 32 RBI, 37 SB)

May flashed the leather and the speed this year for the Barons. His fielding percentage was .991 in 2015 and his numbers on the base paths were solid. He’s not a guy who can hit for power but could be one who adds a quality glove and provide value on the bases. 

White Sox free-agent focus: Dallas Keuchel

White Sox free-agent focus: Dallas Keuchel

This week, we’re profiling some of the biggest names on the free-agent market and taking a look at what kind of fits they are for the White Sox.

The White Sox need starting pitching, so why not bring in a guy with a Cy Young Award sitting on his mantle?

Dallas Keuchel is one of the two biggest names on the starting-pitching market this winter, along with Patrick Corbin, who will get more attention — and likely more dollars — because he's two years younger. But Keuchel's the guy with the track record, the AL Cy Young winner in 2015 (when he was also a top-five MVP finisher), a two-time All Star, a four-time Gold Glove winner and the owner of a 3.28 ERA over the past five seasons, during which he helped the Houston Astros transition from rebuilding to one of baseball's perennial contenders. You might have heard something about them winning the World Series in 2017.

It's true that things have been somewhat up and down for Keuchel since his Cy Young win. After posting a 2.48 ERA with a career-high 216 strikeouts in 33 starts during that 2015 season, he had a 4.55 ERA and 144 strikeouts in 26 starts in 2016, then a 2.90 ERA and 125 strikeouts in 23 starts in 2017 and a 3.74 ERA and 153 strikeouts in 34 starts last season. But three times in the last five years he's finished with an ERA under 3.00. In other words, he's pretty darn good.

How might he fit with the White Sox? Well, in terms of whether or not he lines up with their long-term plans. Keuchel's older than Corbin, but it's not like he's old. He'll be 31 on Opening Day 2019, and a long-term deal, which he's expected to fetch, would keep him around for another planned transition from rebuilding to contention. Keuchel — a veteran who's accomplished a lot already, including putting a World Series ring on his finger — could be viewed as a Jon Lester type for these rebuilding White Sox, a big name who buys into the front office's long-term plan and helps make those plans become reality.

And there's no doubt the White Sox are in the market for starting pitching this winter. Michael Kopech is recovering from Tommy John surgery, and the White Sox decided not to pick up James Shields' option for 2019. That leaves two holes in the starting rotation. An addition like Keuchel would be a long-term one, which means the White Sox would opt to make him a safety net for their still-developing fleet of young pitchers and choose not to roll the dice on a homegrown starting staff for 2020. However, if they're confident in a quintet of Kopech, Carlos Rodon, Lucas Giolito, Reynaldo Lopez and Dylan Cease, then maybe they opt for a couple one-year fill-ins in 2019. Keuchel would not be a one-year fill-in.

Keuchel could also fill the role vacated by Shields, a veteran who could help bring along the young guys in an off-the-field mentor role. His experience going through the dark days of a rebuild — he was a member of Astros teams that lost a combined 310 games from 2012 to 2014 — and coming out the other end a world champ would also figure to be of value.

Of course, the White Sox wouldn't be alone in a pursuit of Keuchel, if they were interested. Thanks to Clayton Kershaw signing a new contract extension with the Los Angeles Dodgers, he's one of the two biggest names on the market when it comes to starting pitchers. The White Sox would likely have to go through the same bidding war and pitch of planned future success they would with other big names like Corbin, Bryce Harper and Manny Machado.

But there's no doubt Keuchel would be an upgrade to this rotation in 2019 and could provide plenty of value for years beyond.

ESPN forgot about the White Sox again, and the Big Hurt let 'em hear about it

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USA TODAY

ESPN forgot about the White Sox again, and the Big Hurt let 'em hear about it

ESPN forgot about the White Sox again.

The Worldwide Leader in Sports has made a habit of failing to remember the South Siders in recent years, most notably forgetting (on multiple occasions) that the White Sox did in fact win the 2005 World Series.

It happened enough times that A.J. Pierzynski had some opinions about it.

This time, the omission came in an effort to illustrate how good Mike Trout is, with ESPN researcher Paul Hembekides listing baseball players who appeared in the top four in MVP voting three or more times. Trout, the Los Angeles Angels superstar, has already done it seven times, and boy that is terrific.

But Hembekides left someone out. And that someone let him hear about it.

You tell 'em, Frank.

Yes, the Big Hurt finished in the top four of the AL MVP vote on six separate occasions: 1991 (third), 1993 (first), 1994 (first), 1997 (third), 2000 (second) and 2006 (fourth, while playing for the Oakland Athletics).

ESPN's blind spot for the White Sox doesn't end up meaning much of anything, though it's amusing that they've now managed to leave out a relatively recent World Series champion and a relatively recent first-ballot Hall of Famer.

We all make mistakes. But it's a little funny that ESPN's are, repeatedly, White Sox related.