White Sox

Adam LaRoche 'won't forget' Friday's heroic homer

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Adam LaRoche 'won't forget' Friday's heroic homer

Adam LaRoche’s homer late Friday didn’t have every aspect of those that Little Leaguers dream about covered, but it’ll do.

Down to their final out, the White Sox rallied on the first baseman’s game-tying solo home run off Detroit closer Joakim Soria and later earned a 4-3 victory in 11 innings at U.S. Cellular Field.

LaRoche’s 403-foot homer to center field is the 250th of his career and one of the more memorable round-trippers, he said.

“Down to our final out there and it allowed us to keep playing and get a win,” LaRoche said. “I can’t say I ever had a goal on home runs or a mark I wanted to hit. Just looking back, it’s neat, the ones you do remember and this will definitely be one of them. I won’t forget this one. Pretty cool.”

[RELATED: Late-inning magic boosts White Sox over Tigers]

The White Sox entered the game last in the American League with 35 homers. They hit two late, including a seventh-inning solo shot by Avisail Garcia.

LaRoche believes the White Sox are a far more capable offense than they have shown so far, including the long ball, and that they’ll prove it as the weather heats up. But the way things have gone, LaRoche admitted he wondered if he got enough of Soria’s 94-mph fastball to reach the stands Friday.

Though Rajai Davis reached the wall in time, any attempt at robbing LaRoche was impeded by the top of the fence, as the center fielder misjudged where he was and jumped into the padding.

[NBC SHOP: Buy an Adam LaRoche jersey!]

It’s not quite the walk-off grand slam he’s dreamt about so many times, but you’re not about to hear LaRoche complain.

“Coming around first, I still wasn’t sure if he caught it or not,” LaRoche said. “He went up on the wall and I never saw the ball. We’ll take it.

“Usually, it’s the bases loaded and you’re down by three. But again, we’ve got to keep playing that with two outs and that could have ended it. That was pretty special.”

Michael Kopech electric in start vs. Pawtucket

Michael Kopech electric in start vs. Pawtucket

The Charlotte Knights took on the Pawtucket Red Sox on Thursday night in a high-profile minor league game due to White Sox No. 2 prospect Michael Kopech being on the mound. 

Kopech, the 22-yearold old flame throwing right-hander, has been collecting impressive strikeout totals but has struggled with his control. He had issued 15 walks over his last five starts, and prior to Thursday's game his ERA was 4.48. But Kopech shined in all facets against Pawtucket.

In six innings of work, Kopech allowed one earned run on seven hits, and had nine strikeouts. But the most important part of his game was that fact that he only issued one walk in the start.

Prior to Thursday's game, Kopech had 122 strikeouts and 57 walks over 88.1 innings pitched. If he continues to cut down his walks he will become a very efficient pitcher in the future. 

But the performance is important in the context of the White Sox losing season, as a lack of control is perhaps the last thing holding Kopech back from being able to make his major league debut.

 

Lucas Giolito has some fun with the not so dark side of his Twitter history

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USA TODAY

Lucas Giolito has some fun with the not so dark side of his Twitter history

White Sox pitcher Lucas Giolito isn't having a great season, but at least it looks like his Twitter account could pass a background check.

A Twitter user dug through some of Giolito's tweets from his teenage years. He didn't find much in the way of hateful, mean or angry tweets. Instead, he found candy, touch tanks at the aquarium and animated movies.

The tweet got plenty of attention on the platform, leading Giolito to comment on it. Giolito took the joke with a good sense of humor and made a joke at his own expense.

This kind of makes you wonder what else would qualify as Giolito's "dark side." Maybe this will spawn a series of Lucas Giolito facts like the very tame version of Chuck Norris or The Most Interesting Man in the World.