White Sox

After 'terrible' BP, Beckham puts on a show for his parents

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After 'terrible' BP, Beckham puts on a show for his parents

By Paul LaTour
CSNChicago.com correspondent

Batting practice didnt go well for Gordon Beckham before Fridays White Sox game against Seattle. Actually, he said it was terrible.

That didnt prevent him from having a career night at the plate against a former Cy Young Award winner.

Beckham hit two home runs in a game for the first time to provide early offense in Chicagos 7-4 victory. Both came off Felix Hernandez, who had allowed only one previous home run against right-handed batters all season.

I felt terrible in BP today, Beckham said. It was just one of those things where I got in the game and got a good feel, and there you go. Which should tell you a lot about batting practice.

Beckham accomplished his feat in front of 19,168 fans at U.S. Cellular Field. But two in particular meant the most to Beckham. His mom and dad were visiting and got to see their sons two home-run performance in person.

A lot of the times when they come, they feel like they put a little more pressure on me, Beckham said. So its nice to do that when they are here and let them know thats not the case.

Beckham finished 2-for-5 with three RBIs to extend his hitting streak to eight games. He just missed getting another RBI hit in the eighth when a diving catch by Michael Saunders in center robbed him of a hit during Chicagos three-run rally.

Hes been swinging the bat real good, Adam Dunn said of Beckham. He just looks hitterish now. Every at bat looks like hes going to do some damage. Hitting has a lot to do with confidence, and he looks like he has it right now.

Thats evident by his hitting streak. Over the eight-game stretch, Beckham is hitting .333 with a double, two home runs, three RBIs and nine runs scored to raise his season average to .229.

Im seeing it OK, but I still have a lot of room for improvement, he said. Im still learning. I guess thats a good thing if Im upset after a two-home run game.

After hitting a two-run homer in the first, Beckham combined with Dunn to hit back-to-back homers in the fifth as the Sox built a 4-0 lead.

He had a great game tonight, manager Robin Ventura said. Felix is tough. Thats not an easy at bat, and he was able to put two good swings on him. That was a big lift for us to get the home runs from him.

The Sox wouldnt be on a nine-game winning streak or 13-1 in their past 14 games if they werent getting contributions from players such as Beckham. Alexei Ramirez and Alejandro De Aza came up with clutch hits in the decisive eighth inning. Dayan Vicedo has also been hot in recent weeks to go along with Paul Konerko, A.J. Pierzynski, Alex Rios and Dunn.

Were playing good baseball and were picking each other up, Beckham said. Thats really important. Everybody is pulling for one another. That often gets overlooked in big league sports, but we all want everybody to do well.

White Sox Talk Podcast: The start of a legend, the story of THE Luis Robert home run

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: The start of a legend, the story of THE Luis Robert home run

In Durham, N.C. in August 2019, White Sox youngster Luis Robert hit one of the most jaw dropping home runs anyone has ever seen or heard. Chuck Garfien relives that legend starting home run with Ryan McGuffey, Vinnie Duber and White Sox players Zack Collins, Danny Mendick, and Nick Madrigal. The link to the homer is below. INDULGE!

(2:45) - Luis Robert is a specimen

(4:15) - Robert does everything well, literally everything

(7:32) - Zack Collins on what he thought of the Robert home run

(9:34) - Danny Mendick remembers what the home run looked like

(11:46) - Nick Madrigal on what the dugout was thinking after the home run

(14:00) - How far can Robert hit a ball in Chicago?

Listen here or in the embedded player below.

 

White Sox Talk Podcast

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In order to be contenders, the White Sox must learn how to win in 2020

In order to be contenders, the White Sox must learn how to win in 2020

GLENDALE, Ariz. — If the White Sox are going to start winning in 2020, they're going to have to learn how.

Certainly a talented roster will play a large role in that. But the influx of veterans this winter didn't just bring on-field capabilities. In adding Yasmani Grandal, Dallas Keuchel, Edwin Encarnacion, Gio Gonzalez and Steve Cishek, Rick Hahn's front office injected this team with winners, guys who have been to the playoffs and made sizable impacts on winning clubs.

If anybody can teach the young White Sox how to win, it's these guys.

"Yasmani's been in the postseason each of the last five years, Keuchel four of the last five years and Edwin each of the last five years," Rick Hahn said after the Encarnacion signing became official in early January. "That's obviously a tremendous track record for each of them but also speaks in part to what we're trying to accomplish not just on the field but in terms of taking that next step in our clubhouse and this young core not only growing together but learning how to win and learning what it takes to be successful not only over the course of the summer but well into October, as well."

And that playoff experience is rather extensive:

— Grandal won four consecutive NL West championships with the Dodgers and went to back-to-back World Series in 2017 and 2018 before helping the Brewers reach — and hitting a home run in — the NL wild card game last season.

— Keuchel reached three out of four postseasons with the Astros, including in his Cy Young season of 2015 and the team's now-controversial World Series season of 2017, and won an NL East title with the Braves in 2019.

— Encarnacion played in three of the last five AL Championship Series and won AL Central crowns with the Indians in 2017 and 2018.

— Gonzalez played in four postseasons with the Nationals and made the NLCS with the Brewers in 2018.

— Cishek pitched with the Cubs team that played in the NL wild card game in 2018.

Considering even the White Sox team leader, Jose Abreu, has never finished a major league season above .500, all this new playoff experience adds something that was sorely missing.

"You've got to have the talent, and we have the talent on this team," Encarnacion said. "This team makes me remember the team that we had in 2015 with the Blue Jays. A lot of young talents, a few veteran guys and we put everything together and this team is going to be right.

"The team has to be together. If you're going to win, we've got to be together like a team. Pick up your teammates. That's why you have to stay together. If your teammate does something wrong, you're going to feel it and you're going to want to do something to help them out. That's all about it.

"This team makes me remember what we had in Toronto. ... This team has the talent to compete in the division and win."

That 2015 Blue Jays team won the AL East and made it to Game 6 of the ALCS before being eliminated by the eventual world-champion Kansas City Royals. Encarnacion hit 39 homers and drove in 111 runs that season, a set of numbers that would be good news for the White Sox half a decade later.

But in addition to that production, the White Sox could reap the benefits of Encarnacion's playoff experience. The same goes for what they can glean from Grandal, Keuchel and Gonzalez.

"I think that these guys in particular have played a huge role in postseason play in terms of actually performing and being in the limelight. I think their presence in and of itself and probably some of the conversations that they suddenly have with the group play a big part," manager Rick Renteria said Tuesday at Camelback Ranch. "I think that's one of the things that we're hoping to take advantage of. For us, it's a really important time, because now we're trying to take those young men that have developed and are putting themselves on the map, as very good Major League Baseball players trying to take it to the next place.

"And it's like anything too, those moments you can't replicate until you get there. So everybody deals with them differently. Hopefully we're able to deal with them positively. And they have some guys in that I've gone through it that will help them be able to make some adjustments."

The winning-experience ingredient has been added to the interesting gumbo that is the 2020 White Sox, a team that has designs on bringing October baseball to the South Side for the first time in more than a decade. All these veterans can serve as resources for the young guys and teach them what is necessary to be a contender along the way.

And these veterans can feed off the talent of those same youngsters to drive toward another addition to their postseason resumes.

"Once you get a little taste of the playoffs, that's why you play is to get that feeling," Keuchel said. "As much as you want to replicate it in the regular season, for guys who have no playoff experience, I think the regular season is that feeling. But there's another feeling to it that pushes you and wants you to be a better player.

"Ultimately I told Rick Hahn this: I said, 'Four out of the last five years, I've made the playoffs, and I don't expect any of these three years (during the contract with the White Sox) to be any different.'" 

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