White Sox

The All-Chicago team, 1970-1979

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The All-Chicago team, 1970-1979

By Tony Andracki and JJ Stankevitz
CSNChicago.com
This spring, we at Cubs Talk and White Sox Talk have decided to unify Chicago's two baseball teams into one in an effort to pick out the best players to grace each side of the city over the last 50 years. Each Wednesday during spring training, we'll roll out a different All-Chicago team, beginning today with the best Cubs and White Sox players from 1970-1979. If you didn't catch our first three installments, check out our 1980-1989, 1990-1999 and 2000-2011 teams.

Tony: There were quite a few Cubs guys from this era that many youngsters would even know. Guys like Steve Stone, Randy Hundley, Don Kessinger, Glenn Beckert. And then, of course, the Hall of Famers Ron Santo, Billy Williams and Fergie Jenkins. Stone didnt win his Cy Young until later in his career with the Orioles, but the Stone Pony pitched for both Chicago teams in the decade and has been a TV personality for each team at some point since. It was a close battle between him and Milt Pappas, but the novelty of having a guy like Stony Pony on the list was just too good to pass up.

JJ: There wasn't a whole lot separating Stone from the rest of the fifth starter pack here. Leaving Pappas off was tough, but at least we're not Bruce Froemming.

Tony: In a lot of ways, this was a simple list to compile. Williams, Santo, Melton and Allen were locks. May, Kingman and Madlock were great players and JJ and I both agreed they needed to be on the team, it was just a matter of where. Kingman earned the final bench spot thanks to his stellar 1979 season in which he led the league with 48 homers and a .613 slugging percentage while knocking in 115 and scoring 97. It was arguably the best single season power performance in Chicago in the decade, so we couldnt leave him off the list.

JJ: Well, Dick Allen might have something to say about that. His 1972 was the second best single season ever by a White Sox player, although in terms of pure power, yeah, Kingman probably has him beat. Allen only had a 1.023 OPS and 37 home runs that year.

Tony: Pitching was also pretty easy as two guys from each team earned the nod. The only question was for the fifth starter spot.

JJ: My god, look at that bullpen. That Terry Forster had to be bumped off the closer line is a real testament to its strength. I don't think we've had a better one in these all-city teams, and that's with the 2000s unit of Bobby Jenks, Carlos Marmol and Matt Thornton.

Tony: I cant say I didnt try for Hundley to be the All-70s catcher, but his numbers were just not very good in the decade and while Downing wasnt head and shoulders better, his .351 OBP was the tipping point.

JJ: It was a valiant effort, but Hundley only spent four years with the Cubs in the decade and owns a .296 OBP in his career on the North Side. And he doesn't get bonus points for his son being part of the deal that netted the Cubs Mark Grudzielanek and Eric Karros.

To the roster:

C: Brian Downing
1B: Dick Allen
2B: Bill Madlock
SS: Don Kessinger
3B: Ron Santo
LF: Billy Williams
CF: Chet Lemon
RF: Rick Monday
DH: Bill Melton

Utility: Carlos May
Utility: Dave Kingman

SP: Wilbur Wood
SP: Fergie Jenkins
SP: Rick Reuschel
SP: Jim Kaat
SP: Steve Stone

CL: Bruce Sutter
RHP: Goose Gossage
LHP: Terry Forster

Check back next week for the all-city team of the 1960s! Chuck and Kap will be back next week to offer up their thoughts on the roster, too.

Moncada's moves help seal White Sox epic extra innings win

Moncada's moves help seal White Sox epic extra innings win

To say the 2018-19 White Sox have had an up-and-down season would be an understatement. The season has been filled with more good than bad for sure‒three All-Stars, 42 wins, one possible Rookie of the Year candidate‒but their seven-game losing streak coming out the All-Star break certainly seemed taxing.

Chicago’s Leury Garica-fueled bounce-back win over the Tampa Bay Rays on Friday certainly helped spirits but Saturday’s dramatic, extra-innings win at Tropicana field could be the type of win that really gets the team back on track.

It looked like the White Sox were headed for their eighth loss in nine games. They were down to their final out when catcher James McCann decided to add another chapter to his storybook season.


 

McCann took a slider from Rays relief pitcher Emilio Pagán 373-feet out to left field for the game-tying home run.

It was another huge moment in a great season from McCann, heightened by the fact that there were so few baserunners (total) in this game and that another o-fer in the scoring column would’ve marked the second shutout loss in a week for the White Sox.

Instead, McCann’s heroics extended a game in which the White Sox bullpen‒2 H, 0 ER‒was excellent in relief of Lucas Giolito, who also pitched well.

Over 6.2 innings, Giolito racked up 9 Ks while giving up 7 hits, 1 walk, 1 earned run. The lone run Giolito gave up was a high changeup that former White Sox outfielder Avisaíl García.

This game was without a doubt a pitchers' duel, so it was only fitting that the game-winning run was scored on an RBI-single by  José Abreu in which Yoan Moncada personified "Ricky's boys don't quit" on the basepaths.


Despite the lack of strong offensive production on Saturday night, the White Sox were able to grind out the win in a Giolito start, something that has been a recurring theme for the squad.

As elder statesmen Abreu hinted at, the White Sox need their key players back but wins like Saturday’s will help build confidence in the meantime.

The South Siders head into Sunday’s noon game with the Rays‒and their subsequent series with the Miami Marlins‒with their seven-game losing streak further in the rearview mirror and that is the best news we could hope for as we await the cavalry.

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White Sox place reliever Kelvin Herrera on injured list with oblique strain

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USA TODAY

White Sox place reliever Kelvin Herrera on injured list with oblique strain

The White Sox saw another pitcher hit the shelf due to injury on Saturday.

Ahead of their game against the Rays, the White Sox placed reliever Kelvin Herrera on the 10-day injured with a right oblique strain. In a corresponding move, the team recalled right-hander Jimmy Cordero from Triple-A Charlotte.

Entering the 2019 season, Herrera was expected to be a formidable late-game reliever in the White Sox bullpen alongside closer Álex Colomé. While Colomé (20-for-21 in save chances, 2.39 ERA in 37 2/3 innings) has thrived, Herrera has struggled in his debut season on the South Side. The 29-year-old holds a 7.36 ERA in 38 games/33 innings. As things currently stand, his .326 batting average against and 3.82 BB/9 would be career highs. 

Herrera's struggles are somewhat suprising when considering how well he pitched (2.44 ERA, 48 games/44 1/3 innings) in 2018. He did struggle after the Royals traded him to the Nationals on June 18, though, perhaps a precursor of what was to come from him in 2019:

Kelvin Herrera in 2018:

  with Royals with Nationals
Games 27 21
Innings 25 2/3 18 2/3
ERA 1.05 4.34
BB 2 8
K 22 16
BAA .207 .304

The White Sox claimed Cordero off of waivers from the Mariners on June 7. He previously pitched with the Nationals (22 games, 19 innings) in 2018 and Blue Jays (one game, 1 1/3 innings) in 2019. He holds a career 5.75 ERA in the MLB, but he's pitched well with Charlotte. The 28-year-old has gone 3-1 with a 0.51 ERA in 17 2/3 innings with the Knights, with opponents hitting just .215 against him in 13 outings.

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