White Sox

Ballantini: White Sox-Cubs all-time series notes

Ballantini: White Sox-Cubs all-time series notes

Saturday, June 26, 2010
Updated at 5:02 p.m.

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

CHICAGO With rare exception, the Chicago White Sox have dominated the Chicago Cubs in crosstown play, dating back to 107 years to 1903, with an overall record of 171-121-8 all-time in 67 years worth of competition. Here are some facts and figures from crosstown history:

City Series (1903-42)
The City Series represents the most competitive games ever played between the two teams. Held concurrent with the World Series, the best-of-seven series was Chicagos own World Series, played for city bragging rights. Teams often gave out solid bonuses to players (sometimes bigger than that of the World Series itself), as the games were well-attended; this was a time when 500 meant a ton to the average player.
To that end, the very first City Series was marred by accusations of games thrown. Cubs pitcher Jack Taylor won his first City Series start, but lost the last three (the series finished in a 7-7 tie); subsequent accusations that he laid down for side money precipitated a trade to the St. Louis Cardinals. As a result, the Cubs refused to play the 1904 series.
The White Sox won the 1912 City Series, 4-3, amid similar accusations, that the Cubswho were up 3-0 before losing four straightlaid down in protest of unpopular manager Frank Chance.
In 1914, the White Sox won the City Series 4-3 after losing three of the first four games.
The 1924 City Series were the first games ever broadcast on local radio.
In 1925, a City Series won by the Cubs in five games, the opening game of the series was a 19-inning tie.
In 1927, the Cubs refused to play the City Series, purportedly because the White Sox were cheering for them to lose the NL pennant (the North Siders finished 8.5 games out) in order to earn some City Series money.
In 1934, Cubs owner William Wrigley thought the Cubs were laying down in order to earn the higher receipts of City Series play, and refused to play the White Sox.
In the very next season (1936), the White Sox swept the Cubs in the City Series and so infuriated Wrigley that he cut some players salaries and ordered all of his Cubs players placed on the trading block.
The White Sox were 91-60-3 in City Series games and captured 19 of 25 series overall (the teams tied in the first years, 1903).

Boys Benefit Game (1949-72)
With the City Series scuttled by World War II, the White Sox struck the series back up with a single-game exhibition to benefit youth baseball.
Although all but two of the games were played at Comiskey Park, the Cubs were 13-10 in the series.
A White Sox vs. Cubs-best 52,712 came to the June 25, 1964 game at Comiskey Park, won by the Pale Hose, 11-1. Fans were allowed to stand in the outfield during that game.

Mayors Series (1981)
Chicago mayor Jane Byrne proposed a revival of meetings between the two teams. August 7s game at Comiskey Park was a scoreless tie, while the next day the Cubs knocked off the White Sox, 4-3.

Exhibition Play (1982)
In 1982, both the crosstown exhibition games scheduled were cancelled...because of snow.

Windy CityCrosstown Classic (1985-94)
One-game sets were agreed upon to benefit team charities. The White Sox went 8-0-2 in these games, which alternated between Comiskey Park and Wrigley Field.
In the April 17, 1994 game at Wrigley Field, Michael Jordan started in right field for the White Sox and went two-of-four with two RBI in the 4-4 tie.

Tribune Twinbill (1995)
The Chicago Tribune sponsored a home-and-home series before the labor-delayed start of the 1995 season. Its holding didnt fare so well, as the Cubs lost to the White Sox 6-3 on April 24 at Comiskey Park and 6-2 on April 25 at Wrigley Field.

Spring Training (1998-present)
The White Sox hold a 22-16-2 edge in spring training play vs. the Cubs.

Interleague Play (1997-present)
Since official interleague play started in 1997, the White Sox lead the series 39-36, outscoring the Cubs, 367-348.
The White Sox have won the last nine of 12 games in the series and 10 of the last 15 series overall.
The White Sox have never won more than four games in the season series.
The longest winning streak in interleague play has been the Cubs, with a six-game streak in 2007-08.
Three of Paul Konerkos 23 multi-homer games have come vs. the Cubs.
The White Sox have won three of five extra-inning games in interleague play, all of which came between 1998 and 2001.
Mark Buehrle has five wins vs. the Cubs, more than any other White Sox pitcher. Buehrles career interleague record is 23-6, giving him more interleague wins than any other pitcher. However, hes just 5-4 vs. the Cubs, making him 18-2 vs. all other National League clubs.
Ozzie Guillen's career record in interleague play vs. the Cubs: 2-for-11 with one run, one double, a walk and a K.

Interleague Records
Konerko leads in most White Sox offensive categories, including games (56), runs (28), homers (14), hits (60) and RBI (41). Scott Podsednik leads the series with nine steals, Sandy Alomar Jr. with a .450 average (Carlos Quentin leads active Sox at .368) and Frank Thomas with 23 walks.
On the pitching side, Buehrle leads in wins (five) and losses (four), starts (12), strikeouts (57) and innings (79.1). Freddy Garcia has an amazing 0.41 ERA vs. the Cubs, Keith Foulke leads with 17 appearances and Bobby Jenks has four saves.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.com's White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute White Sox information.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Discussing 2020 White Sox expectations

kopech_pod-831.jpg
USA TODAY

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Discussing 2020 White Sox expectations

SportsTalk Live is on location at McCormick Place to preview SoxFest 2020. Chuck Garfien and David Haugh join David Kaplan on the panel.

0:00 - White Sox manager Rick Renteria joins the guys to talk about the team's big offseason and the expectations for the 2020 season. He also talks about how the team with handle Michael Kopech (4:00) and what Dallas Keuchel brings to the rotation. (6:00) Plus, he explains how guys who turned the corner in 2019 like Lucas Giolito and Yoan Moncada can stay hot in 2020. (15:00)

17:00 - Steve Stone joins the guys to explain how the White Sox rebuild is going according to plan despite not landing one of the top free agents this winter. Plus, he updates his Twitter follower battle with Jason Benetti (23:00) and talks about how he would handle Michael Kopech's return. (25:30)

Listen to the full episode in the embedded player below:

White Sox reward for winning the offseason: They get to talk playoffs ... or bust

White Sox reward for winning the offseason: They get to talk playoffs ... or bust

The White Sox know there is no trophy for winning the offseason.

Make no mistake, they did win the offseason, Rick Hahn’s front office adding enough veteran cache to vault the 89-loss South Siders from just another rebuilding team with a bright future to a team whose future is pulling into the station.

But there was no self-congratulating at Hahn’s pre-SoxFest press conference Thursday.

“Quite candidly, we haven't accomplished anything yet, we haven't won yet,” he said. “This whole process was about winning championships, was about finishing with a parade at the end of October down Michigan Avenue. Until that happens, I don't think any of us are really in a position to feel satisfied or feel like we've accomplished anything.

“We've had a nice winter. We've had, frankly, in our opinion, a real nice three years since we started (the rebuild) with the Chris Sale trade. We think very bright days are ahead of us, and we look forward to enjoying them. But in terms of feeling like we've accomplished something or feeling satisfied, ask me after the parade.”

Give me a second while I email that last bit over to our marketing department. They might be able to conjure up a few things with “ask me after the parade.”

But in all seriousness, Hahn is right. There is no trophy for winning the offseason. The act of signing free agents does not balance out all the losing over the last three seasons. Only winning can do that.

There has been, however, a reward for winning the offseason. Rick Renteria — and presumably all his players this weekend during SoxFest — get to talk about playoff expectations. Real ones.

“I would be disappointed if we don’t make the postseason,” Renteria said during his own session Thursday. “We want to break through. We want this to be an impactful season.”

As recently as a year ago, no matter how bright the future appeared to be, that comment would have raised eyebrows. It would not have been taken seriously. Now? It is the expectation.

Renteria has not been shy about the rebuilding White Sox turning the corner in 2020. He spent the last few weeks of the 2019 campaign making similar postseason proclamations. But now Hahn has backed his manager up with all this winter’s acquisitions.

The White Sox place in the standings by the end of September still figures to have a lot more to do with Yoan Moncada and Lucas Giolito and Eloy Jimenez and Tim Anderson and Luis Robert than any of the individual newcomers, even players as talented and accomplished as Yasmani Grandal and Dallas Keuchel. The core is that important. But the outsiders brought in this offseason have embodied the turning tide — and given Renteria the chance to talk seriously about these kinds of big expectations for the first time in his tenure as the South Side skipper.

“I think, man for man,” he said, “now we at least have a little bit more ammunition to be able to go out and compete hopefully on a consistent basis and put those victories on the board.

“I’m not afraid of talking about high expectations and winning. … If we do our job and we go about preparing and hopefully the actions and performances come to fruition, we should be on top of the victory column in terms of wins and losses. And there’s nothing beyond my thought that doesn’t say that I expect us to compete and be in conversation for postseason play.”

Hahn isn’t quite as willing to declare the 2020 season “playoffs or bust” because he’s still got his eye on the long term, the same place it’s been throughout this rebuilding process. That next parade down Michigan Avenue is supposed to be merely the first.

And so while the White Sox can reap the rewards of Hahn’s offseason work in the form of preseason talk, he’ll bask in nothing more than setting up his team for that long-term postseason success.

“I think the expectations are understandably high, at least when you talk to Ricky or the coaches or any of the players or anyone in uniform. Their expectation is that this team is in a position to win in the 2020 season, which is exactly where all of us in the front office would want them to be,” he said. “That said, whether you're talking Jerry (Reinsdorf) or Kenny (Williams) or myself, the entire purpose of this rebuild was to put ourselves in a multi-year position to win multiple championships.

“So the progress that we make in any given offseason has to be viewed not just about what's going to happen in that upcoming season, but what position that puts us in toward accomplishing that long-term goal. We want to make sure that we are well positioned, once that window opens, to win as many championships as possible.

“When that window opens, we're going to find out together. I certainly think the players in uniform think it's going to happen come Opening Day of this year. Whether we're blessed with good health and continued progress from our young players, we're going to find out together.

“But we look at it, in the front office, from a multi-year perspective. The guys in uniform are going to do everything in their power to make it about now, which you've got to appreciate.”

That’s going to be the theme of this weekend, as White Sox fans descend on SoxFest with more excitement than they have in years. This is a White Sox team expected to reach October, and that hasn’t exactly been common, as evidenced by the franchise’s more than decade-long postseason drought.

Hahn can talk about putting the team in good position for 2021 and 2022 and 2023 and beyond all he wants. The fans are finally — and with good reason — thinking playoffs or bust for the upcoming season.

And the manager agrees.

“I see our club, and I want to go into this season thinking I don't want to miss an opportunity,” Renteria said. “That's my goal right now, not to miss this opportunity. Expectations bread opportunities. I'm not afraid of expectations because it breads opportunity. I want to attain and complete those tasks that I think our club is going to have a chance to be able to do.

“I'm not afraid to say it.”

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