White Sox

Breaking down rounds 2-16 for the White Sox

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Breaking down rounds 2-16 for the White Sox

Rounds 2-16 of the MLB Draft are underway on Tuesday, and the White Sox have sprung for pitching and up-the-middle position players so far. Here's a look at who the Sox selected today:

Round 2, Pick 76: Chris Beck, RHP, Georgia Southern University

From the MLB.com scouting report, it sounds like Beck has three fairly well-developed pitches, but the report says he doesn't always throw like a power pitcher despite a fastball that tops out at 94 mph. In 103 23 innings for GSU, Beck posted a 3.91 ERA with 115 strikeouts, 29 walks and 11 home runs allowed in 103 23 innings.

Round 3, Pick 108: Joey DeMichele, 2B, Arizona State University

For a second baseman, DeMichele has shown decent power, hitting 15 home runs in just under 400 at-bats in the last two years (stats go up to Memorial Day). He's a low-strikeout player who doesn't walk a ton, relying mostly on contact skills to boost his OBP near .400 with the Sun Devils.

Round 4, Pick No. 141: Brandon Brennan, RHP, Orange Coast College (Calif.)

Brennan was a 40th-round pick of the Rockies in 2010 but opted to attend the University of Oregon, where he spent one year before transferring to Orange Coast College. Here's a YouTube clip of the right-hander from earlier this year:

Round 5, Pick No. 171: Nick Basto, SS, Archbishop McCarthy HS (Fla.)

Per South Florida Sun-Sentinel preps reporter Dieter Kurtenbach, Basto, who's committed to FIU, intends to turn pro -- although the Sox will have to squeeze him in under their bonus cap to make that happen. Video:

Round 6, Pick No. 201: Kyle Hansen, RHP, St. John's University

The brother of former Red Sox and Pirates reliever Craig Hansen, the younger Hansen appears destined to land in the bullpen despite working as a starter in college. MLB.com's report describes a good fastball-slider combo with a change that needs refinement, which sounds pretty typical of a pitching prospect who ultimately will wind up being used as a reliever.

Round 7, Pick No. 231: Jose Barraza, C, Sunnyside High School (Calif.)

Barraza cracked Baseball America's top 500 draft prospects list at No. 472, and per FutureSox, he's not committed to a college. That doesn't necessarily mean the Sox have a better chance at signing him, as JuCo is always an option.

Round 8, Pick No. 261: Zach Isler, RHP, University of Cincinnati

Pitching nearly exclusively in relief, Isler struck out 55 in 55 innings with 26 walks during his junior year at Cincinnati, but he has a mid-90s fastball that could play with some development.

Round 9, Pick No. 291: Micah Johnson, 2B, University of Indiana

Johnson put together a fine 2010 (.335.402.474) before an elbow injury stunted his growth in 2011. He only played in 24 games and didn't hit well, perhaps a product of his injury. Could be an interesting guy to watch if he gets back to his pre-2012 trajectory.

Round 10, Pick No. 321: Brandon Hardin, RHP, Delta State University (Miss.)

No, not the Bears' rookie safety. He struggled as a starter but excelled as a reliever, where he'll probably end up in the White Sox system.

Round 11, Pick No. 351: Eric Jaffe, RHP, UCLA

A 19th-round pick of Boston in the 2010 MLB Draft, he transferred from Cal to UCLA and didn't pitch a whole lot while on campus. He's a big guy (6-foot-4, 235 lbs.) who pitches in relief. Video:

Dallas Keuchel frustrated with White Sox' effort in loss to Tigers

Dallas Keuchel frustrated with White Sox' effort in loss to Tigers

Dallas Keuchel took his teammates to task after Monday’s uninspiring 5-1 loss at the hands of the Detroit Tigers.

The White Sox arrived in Detroit in the wee hours Monday morning after losing a hard-fought, extra innings, rain-delayed game vs. the Indians on Sunday, and Keuchel says the team let that carry over into Monday’s game.

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“I would’ve liked to see the team play better tonight,” Keuchel said. “We just came out flat, and I feel like we stayed flat the whole game.

“We’ve got some guys coming out and taking professional at-bats, being professional on the mound, and doing what it takes to win, and we’ve got some guys kinda going through the motions. So, we need to clean a lot of things up.

“If we wanna be in this thing at the end of the season, we’re going to have to start that now. When you have enough talent to potentially win every game it’s very frustrating when you have games like this and it just seems like we were out of it from the get go... Today was one of the first games I've seen subpar play from everybody."

While that is obviously not the assessment fans want to hear from one of the top free agents the White Sox brought in this season, it’s that leadership that the team coveted so much from Keuchel in the first place. Leading is easy during a hot streak, but it’s more important during losing skids. Keuchel seems to understand that’s what the White Sox need as they try to transition from rebuilding team to playoff contenders.

“There’s going to be a lot of learning curves for this team, just because of the process that this team has been under for the last two or three years, and this is one of them. We faced a challenge tonight and hopefully we can come out tomorrow and strap it up and play some White Sox baseball.”

Tuesday’s expected return of Tim Anderson, whose energy has been noticeably missing since he suffered a groin strain on July 31, should help the team regain that spark. As one of the Sox’ most consistent hitters he should also help the sluggish offense, which has only mustered 11 runs over the last six games.

“We have a great opportunity these next couple of games to get some wins and keep moving the wagons forward,” Keuchel said. “As frustrating as it is tonight, we could very well easily come out tomorrow and play like we’re supposed to and then win the series on Wednesday.”


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Detroit Tigers' C.J. Cron hit by ball, needs to be helped off field

Detroit Tigers' C.J. Cron hit by ball, needs to be helped off field

A scary scene unfolded during the 4th inning of Monday’s series opener between the White Sox and Tigers.

C.J. Cron needed to be helped off the field after he got hit by a sharp ground ball while fielding at first base.

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Cron lay on the ground for several minutes after the play and limped off the field with the help of Tigers staff.

Amazingly, pitcher Daniel Norris was able to corral the ball and tag out Danny Mendick to end the inning.

Cron has been one of the Tigers’ best power hitters, tied for the team league with four home runs.


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