White Sox

Buehrle bashed, September struggles continue

535754.jpg

Buehrle bashed, September struggles continue

Friday, Sept. 9, 2011
Posted: 10:21 p.m. Updated: 11:44 p.m.

Associated Press

Box score Photo gallery
VIDEO: Ozzie on Buehrle's recent struggles
VIDEO: De Aza describes amazing catch

If September is the time for a player to demonstrate his qualifications, Lonnie Chisenhall is building a solid case for next season.Chisenhall hit a pair of two-run homers and the Cleveland Indians beat the Chicago White Sox 8-4 on Friday night.Chisenhall, Cleveland's rookie third baseman, set career highs with his two homers and four RBIs as the Indians snapped a four-game losing streak."Lonnie Chisenhall had a big day, especially considering the way he has struggled against lefties," Indians manager Manny Acta said.Ezequiel Carrera, Kosuke Fukudome, Shelley Duncan and Lou Marson had two hits apiece for the Indians. Carrera and Fukudome each drove in two runs.Jeanmar Gomez (3-2) allowed two runs and six hits over six innings and improved to 3-0 with a 0.52 ERA in three starts since being recalled from Triple-A Columbus on Aug. 30."We have struggled as of late," Acta said. "Gomez stepped up and stopped our four-game losing streak. He threw the ball very well, with movement, good sink on his fastball."Gomez went 0-2 record with a 5.70 ERA in five outings before being sent down on July 18. The results since his return have been startling.What's been the biggest difference?"Fastball command," Acta said. "Also, he made some mechanical adjustments down there. He's gotten a little bit more velocity on his fastball."White Sox starter Mark Buehrle (11-8) had his second straight rough outing, allowing seven runs and eight hits over 5 23 innings."It was another one of those days," Buehrle said. "I know I made a bad pitch in the sixth inning, left an 0-2 curveball hanging. That was pretty much the game right there."After entering the game just 3 for 22 with two homers against lefties this season, Chisenhall homered twice against Buehrle, who has won more games than any other southpaw in baseball over the last decade except for the Yankees' CC Sabathia."He's done great things for the White Sox," Chisenhall said. "To hit a home run off him, he's a great pitcher, so I'm definitely going to remember it."Chisenhall got the Indians on the board first, launching a first-pitch drive over the picnic area in right field.The rookie third baseman went deep on an 0-2 pitch in the sixth to almost the same area in right, putting Cleveland ahead 4-2. That gave Chisenhall his first two-homer game and his first game with more than two RBIs."The more he sees (lefties), the better he's going to get," Acta said. "He's a guy that projects not to be a platoon guy."Before the game, Acta spoke of Cleveland's need for better production from its corner infield positions next season, whether it comes from within the organization or outside. Chisenhall, 22, has been one of the Indians' top prospects for a couple of seasons and may be the ready to solve half of that dilemma."He's going to get there," Acta said. "We have to think, this kid is only 22 years old. He only played three years of minor league baseball. It's going to take him some time."Chisenhall duplicated the feat of his White Sox counterpart, third baseman Brent Morel, who had his first multi-homer game in Chicago's 8-1 win on Thursday night. He's now hit three homers over his last three games, doubling his season total."Two home runs and winning is pretty fun," Chisenhall said.The Indians tacked on three more runs in the decisive five-run sixth. Carrera singled in a run, chasing Buehrle. Fukudome then singled in two runs off reliever Will Ohman, with both runs charged to Chicago's starter.Buehrle gave up seven earned runs for the second straight start after giving up four runs or fewer each of his 21 previous starts."I feel fine," Buehrle said. "I don't feel worn out. I feel like the first couple of innings, the velocity was down a little bit. I was taking time to get loose, but the last couple of innings I was throwing a little harder. I made a couple of mistakes and I made some good pitches and they were getting hits. That's baseball."In the third, Juan Pierre doubled home Gordon Beckham and scored on Paul Konerko's sacrifice fly, drawing the White Sox even at 2.Beckham had two hits and scored two runs for the White Sox, but struck out looking with two runners in scoring position to end the game, keeping the night's focus on Chisenhall, who is going to get plenty of playing time down the stretch."Chisenhall is playing," Acta said. "We're planning on playing Lonnie a lot."NOTES
The White Sox placed utility player Brent Lillibridge on the 15-day disabled list because of a fractured fifth metacarpal in his right hand, suffered when he was hit by a pitch on Thursday. Lillibridge is out for the season. ... Cleveland's Fausto Carmona (6-14) will take the hill on Saturday, looking to improve on the 10.47 ERA he's posted in three starts against Chicago this season. He'll oppose Phil Humber, who threw seven scoreless innings against Minnesota in his last start, his first after coming off the disabled list.Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Live from Opening Night of SoxFest 2020

soxfest-stl.jpg
NBC Sports Chicago

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Live from Opening Night of SoxFest 2020

David Kaplan is joined by Chuck Garfien as they speak with the newest White Sox winter acquisitions from this offseason as well as the current White Sox core from Opening Night of SoxFest 2020 in McCormick Place.

Listen to the full episode in the embedded player below:

Sports Talk Live Podcast

Subscribe:

Dallas Keuchel apologizes in wake of Astros' sign-stealing scandal: 'I personally am sorry'

Dallas Keuchel apologizes in wake of Astros' sign-stealing scandal: 'I personally am sorry'

Dallas Keuchel started his White Sox tenure with an apology.

Keuchel said he was sorry Friday, the first player to do so in the aftermath of baseball busting Keuchel’s former club, the Houston Astros, for using technology to steal signs during their run to a world championship in 2017.

Keuchel didn’t get into too many specifics, nor did he reveal whether he played any kind of role in the Astros’ process of relaying the signs of opposing catchers via a center field camera and a monitor near the dugout, then alerting teammates to what sort of pitch was coming by banging on a trashcan in the dugout.

But he did apologize, doing so, perhaps, in an effort to speak for that group of players who have been the subject of much discussion since Astros general manager Jeff Luhnow and manager A.J. Hinch were fired earlier this month.

“I think, first and foremost, I think apologies should be in order,” Keuchel said before the opening ceremonies of SoxFest at McCormick Place. “When the stuff was going on, it was never intended to be what it’s made to be right now. I think when stuff comes out about some things that happen during the course of a big league ball season, it’s always blown up to the point of, ‘Oh my gosh, this has never happened before.’

“I’m not going to go into specific detail, but during the course of the playoffs in ‘17, everybody was using multiple signs. For factual purposes, when there’s nobody on base, when in the history of Major League Baseball has there been multiple signs? You can go back and watch film of every team in the playoffs, there were probably six out of eight teams with multiple signs. It’s just what the state of baseball was at that point in time.

“Was (what the Astros did) against the rules? Yes, it was, and I personally am sorry for what’s come about, the whole situation. But it is what it is, and we’ve got to move past that. I never thought anything would’ve come like it did, and I, myself, feel sorry. But you’ve got to move on.”

While no players have been punished for their roles in what happened in 2017, it remains somewhat head-scratching as to why the uber-talented Astros thought they even needed to do this sort of thing to reach the top of the baseball mountain.

Keuchel said Friday that sometimes the sign-stealing did give the Astros an edge and sometimes it didn't.

"To the extent of the whole situation back then, I can tell you that not every game there was signs being stolen," he said. "Some guys did a really good job. And sometimes we did as a group have signs, but we still couldn't hit the pitcher. So it wasn't like every game we had everything going on so at that point that's when the whole system, it really works a little bit, but at the same time there was a human element where some guys were better than our hitters."

In addition to offering up his own apology, Keuchel ever so briefly weighed in on the still-hot-button topic of whether former Astros pitcher Mike Fiers was right to act as a whistleblower and reveal details of the sign-stealing to the commissioner.

"That's a tough subject because it's such a tight-knit community in the clubhouse and in baseball, especially," Keuchel said. "You're playing 162 games, at least, in the regular season, plus spring training and then maybe in the playoffs, if you're lucky. So you're pushing 185 to 200 games (with each other), and it sucks to the extent of that the clubhouse rule was broken. And that's where I'll go with that. I don't have much else to say about Mike."

As for where things go from here, that remains to be seen. The Boston Red Sox remain under investigation for allegations of similar behavior during their run to a World Series title a year later. Alex Cora was the bench coach with the 2017 Astros and the manager of the 2018 Red Sox, and though baseball has not levied any specific punishment toward him yet, the Red Sox fired him. Carlos Beltran, the only player from the 2017 Astros mentioned in commissioner Rob Manfred's summary of the investigation, was fired from his briefly held post as the manager of the New York Mets.

"There are a lot of people who are sorry in that organization, including myself, for what happened," he said. "Do pitchers benefit from any of that? I mean, not really. But at the same time, we might've had a few runs more per game.

"In my instance, I did not. I was actually pretty mad about that, I didn't really enjoy that sometimes, but it is what it is and it just happened to come out that Mike said something and who knows.

"I don't think anybody else is going to come out and say anything from other teams. They see what happens now."

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the White Sox easily on your device.