White Sox

Chris Sale: White Sox ‘got bold-faced lied to’ on Adam LaRoche situation

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Chris Sale: White Sox ‘got bold-faced lied to’ on Adam LaRoche situation

GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Chris Sale addressed the media on Friday morning to talk about the surprising retirement of Adam LaRoche and Tuesday’s morning meeting. Here’s a transcript of what the four-time All-Star pitcher said.

Question: Can you talk about Tuesday’s meeting and your interaction with Kenny Williams?

Chris Sale: Came in, team meeting, just trying to find some common ground and clearly it didn’t get there. It’s just one of the things that kind of happens in the game. You’re not always going to see eye to eye with everyone you work with and everybody within the organization and you move on.

Q: Talked to Kenny since that meeting?

A: I have not.

Q: You said common ground — did he come down here saying ‘We’d like to compromise on the new policy’ or is it, ‘This is the new policy’?

A: Yeah well, Kenny said quite a few things, contradicting statements a couple times. He came to the players, said it was the coaches. Went to the coaches, said it was the players and then came in here and told us it was the owner. So, we’re not exactly — who it’s coming from, where it originated from. That’s why we’re still trying to figure out where it all came from.

Q: If this happened before spring training and talked about it with the players do you think it would have had a better reception? 

A: No doubt. I think if the right person had handled it I think it would have been completely different. This isn’t us rebelling against rules. This is kind of us rebelling against BS, plain and simple. It’s not the fact we have a problem with the rules. We have to wear suits on the plane, we all dress up nice, carry ourselves in professional manners. But when it comes to what goes on in the clubhouse, the right person has to handle that and that’s Robin (Ventura). He’s the top, he’s the leader of this clubhouse ultimately and if there’s something that needs to be said in here he can say it and it’s taken with respect because he’s fighting with us. And quite honestly, he has taken heat for us before that he doesn’t deserve. So we have faith in him and we trust him.

[MORE WHITE SOX: Upset White Sox players considered boycotting game after Adam LaRoche retirement]

Q: Were you pretty outspoken in the meeting?

A: It’s neither here nor there. That’s not the issue and even the story that everyone is reading isn’t the issue. We have a much bigger problem on our hands than Kenny coming in here and kicking out a kid and Roachy retiring. That’s the unfortunate part of all of this. But at the end of the day it wasn’t the right thing. There was no problem in here. We were rolling. We had a team coming together with new guys getting acquainted and playing well, no hiccups, nothing. We’re a steam engine going full steam ahead and kind of derailed it. We had some positive energy going. There was absolutely no problem in here whatsoever with anyone and he kind of created a problem.

Q: Can one meeting and an apology turn things around?

A: I mean, we’re still missing a teammate plain and simple. Like I said, there was no issue before and we’re still trying to find out what the truth is.

Q: What’s the bigger problem?

A: Lying, plain and simple. We got bold-faced lied to by someone we’re supposed to be able to trust. You can’t come tell the players it was the coaches and tell the coaches it’s the players and then come in and say something completely different. If we’re all here to win a championship, this kind of stuff doesn’t happen. Like I said, we’re not rebelling against the rules. It has nothing to do with the rules. It’s a much deeper issue and all this negative attention around so much positivity that was here before. We were rolling. We were having a great time. You guys have seen it. The drills are crisp, everything was clicking. And it just took someone to come in here and throw a wrench in the plans.

Q: Why have these (jerseys) up here?

A: Because Drake is honestly one of the best kids I have ever met. You can ask anybody, anybody, that has ever played with Adam. And I think that’s another part of the issue. We’re not talking about some guy and his kid. We’re talking about Adam LaRoche. I dare you to find something negative about that guy from anybody he has played with or come across. Same thing with Drake. This kid is wise beyond his years. He’s mature beyond his years and quite honestly he was a blast to have around. He was, for the lack of a better term, our team mascot. He brought just as much energy to this clubhouse as anybody and it’s a hard pill to swallow for someone outside of the clubhouse to tell us what’s going to happen. We don’t go up to his office and tell him how to do his job.

Q: There’s reports that players complained about (Drake) to some extent?

A: I believe if a player had a problem with it they would have come to Adam or at least taken it to Robin. I think Robin was the right person to handle this and he was handcuffed.

[MORE WHITE SOX: Adam LaRoche retired after White Sox asked him to limit son's time with team]

Q: What are your concerns about how this affects the team moving forward?

A: We’re missing two big pieces to our puzzle, plain and simple. I’m not going to sit here and say it’s going to be the main reason, but he’s definitely going to be missed and we’re not going to get him back.

Q: How frustrated are you that this happened at this point in time?

A: It’s extremely frustrating, especially when people tell you we’re here to win a championship and then stuff like this happens. If we’re truly here to win a championship and come together and play as a team and win as a team, these issues don’t come up. It’s just unfortunate. Somebody walked out those doors the other day and it was the wrong guy, plain and simple.

Q: Do you have more admiration now for Adam than you had even before?

A: No doubt. How can you not? Like I said, this is a bigger issue than being told that his son can’t be around and him walking away. I think that’s what everyone’s focus is. Everyone is focusing on the story that’s printed, but it’s a much deeper issue than that. I commend him, I stand behind him clearly 100 percent in his decision. Would I love to have him back? Absolutely. No doubt. And I think anybody in here would take him back in a heartbeat, would love to have him back in here. But at the same time, you have to respect a man that stands by his word and is not afraid to stand up in what he believes in.

Q: How do you move on as a team, organization?

A: We just keep trucking. We try to get back to where we were before this mess started. We were rolling. We had positive energy in here. Nobody saw anything as a distraction until all this happened. We just try to pick up the pieces, collect it all and put it back together and keep trucking.

Q: Can LaRoche come back?

A: I don’t know. I’m certainly staying optimistic about it.

[MORE WHITE SOX: Players supported Adam LaRoche, son in Tuesday meeting]

Q: Have you spoken to him? 

A: I have. I didn’t want to step on his toes clearly, but like I said, we would all love to have him back but I don’t know if that’s going to happen.

Q: The biggest issue is the trust issue and being told a lie from Kenny?

A: Yeah. When there’s a problem, you get to the source and find out what it is. We’ve been told three different stories. We don’t know what avenue to go down or who to believe from who it originated from.

Q: Three different stories as to where it originated?

A: Yeah. First it was the players that said something then it was the coaches that said something and now it’s the owner said something.

Q: And Kenny has given you all three stories?

A: Yes. Now we’re just as confused as you guys. You guys are looking at me like I have 17 eyes up here, but I’m not saying anything that isn’t the truth. I have no reason to. There’s no reason for me to sit here and lie about something that I witnessed and was a part of.

Q: Where does Kenny stand now with the guys in the clubhouse?

A: We don’t need to get into that. I’m not here to be disrespectful to anybody and call names. But I am here to state the facts and you guys got them.

Q: Hoping Mr. (Jerry) Reinsdorf might talk to you guys?

A: Yeah, I think that’s the ultimate goal is to talk to him and speak to someone with a level head and try to find some common ground, try to see where this came from. Jerry is a very understanding person and I think if we can get too him and speak to him and have an adult conversation. I think we’ll be able to figure some things out and iron out the creases.

Q: Why can’t a grievance be filed?

A: I don’t know anything about that. That’s really none of my concern. My concern is this team and the well-being of this team. I have a lot of time invested in this team, the whole blood, sweat and tears thing. I want to win and I think all of you guys know that and everyone in here knows that. With the things that are going on, that’s going to be a much harder task to accomplish, plain and simple.

Q: Will you continue to feel like a leader and somebody that has to do that for this team?

A: I believe so, yes. That’s the position I’m in. I have to speak for the people who don’t have voices. I have to speak for my teammates now. I have to speak for my teammates in the future. This is something that needs to be taken care of for the well being of the White Sox. Not just Adam. Not just me. This is something that could have a lasting impression for years to come and could affect future teams. I’m not a fan of that. If we are truly trying to win a championship, there’s no room for this kind of stuff.

Q: Can this hurt the team in free agency in the future?

A: I don’t see how it couldn’t. I don’t see why someone with a handful of offers on the table could look and say you know what, that’s a mess I want to go into. No. It’s unfortunate for everyone else involved because this ultimately comes down to the White Sox. This is Rick (Hahn) and Robin and Jerry and the players and the coaching staff are probably going to get heat for something they don’t deserve. Rick, I truly believe is trying to build a winning team. We have a lot of respect for that guy. We have a lot of respect for Robin because he’s leading the charge. We just don’t have room for outside distractions.

[SHOP WHITE SOX: Get your White Sox gear right here]

Q: This will be looked at as a coup, Kenny versus the team, the team versus Kenny. Is that an accurate portrayal?

A: I don’t think anyone in here has a problem with anybody else in the organization.

Q: The bottom line is Adam was promised he could have Drake around?

A: It was in his contract just like anything else. I think they would have had a better job saying, ‘Hey you can bring your son, but you have to play for free this year.’ I think that would have gone over a little bit better. It was as much of a guarantee as anything else.

Q: Is it more difficult for you to do the things you need to do to get ready with this?

A: Absolutely not. I have a team I have to stand by. I still have a job to do. It’s not these guys fault. I’m not going to take it out on them. We all have the same idea. And we are trying to achieve that. I can’t reiterate enough. It’s not us rebelling against rules. It’s us rebelling against things that don’t have a place in the clubhouse.

Q: Different story if Adam hits 30 home runs last year?

A: That’s another thing too. For us, it just seems like him trying to make rules just to make rules. Unfortunately, it shook out the way it did. It’s unfortunate. It really is. We are trying to win, we really are. We have a good thing going on in here, we really do. We have great guys and a great team. We just have got something in the way.

Q: Would this impact the way you look at staying in the organization?

A: I’m going to be here for a while. I still have a lot of time left in this uniform. I’m not shying away from playing as hard as I can in this uniform. This doesn’t have anything to do with my teammates or the organization. I’m still going to fight to my last breath for this team and for my teammates. But on the flip side I have to fight for our rights too and what is right and what is wrong and what is truth and what is false.

White Sox vs. Red Sox simulation on MLB The Show 20 (Game 9)

White Sox vs. Red Sox simulation on MLB The Show 20 (Game 9)

NBC Sports Chicago is simulating the 2020 White Sox season via MLB The Show during the postponement of play. The White Sox, stocked with young talent and veteran offseason acquisitions, were expected to take a big step forward in their rebuild this season. Follow along as we play out the first few months of the season.

After two straight games of baseball bashing, it seemed like White Sox bats were finally going to have a quiet day in the final matchup of a three-game set vs. the Red Sox at Fenway Park.

The South Siders managed only one run through the first seven innings of play, an RBI single by Jose Abreu in the third.

Meanwhile, Reynaldo Lopez, looking to build off his five innings of one-run ball last time out, ran into trouble in the fifth. The Dominican hurler gave up a three-run homer to Christian Vazquez, who already has 12 RBI (T-2nd in the AL) on the young season.

With the White Sox trailing 4-1 in the eighth, it looked like the brooms would have to be kept in the closet for another day. That all changed with two swings of the bat. First, Eloy Jimenez hit a three-run blast that hugged the left field line and just cleared the Green Monster to tie the game 4-4.

Then, Nomar Mazara hit a game-winning no-doubter 447 feet to right field, his first home run of 2020. Aaron Bummer shut the door, just like the first two games of the series and the White Sox completed the sweep of the Red Sox, 5-4.

Result: White Sox def. Red Sox 5-4

Record: 6-3, first in AL Central

W: Jimmy Cordero (1-0)

L: Ryan Brasier (1-2)

SV: Aaron Bummer (5)

White Sox lineup

Tim Anderson: 2-5, 2B (.359 BA)

Yoan Moncada: 1-4, 2B (.359 BA)

Jose Abreu: 1-5, RBI (.268 BA)

Edwin Encarnacion: 1-3, 2 BB (.226 BA)

Yasmani Grandal: 1-3, 2 BB (.343 BA)

Eloy Jimenez: 1-4, HR, 3 RBI (.273 BA)

Luis Robert: 0-5 (.211 BA)

Nomar Mazara: 1-4, HR, RBI (.212 BA)

Leury Garcia: 0-3, BB (.231 BA)

Scoring summary

Top 3rd:

Jose Abreu singled to left field. Tim Anderson scored. 1-0 CHW.

Bottom 5th:

Christian Vazquez homered to left field. Mitch Moreland scored. Alex Verdugo scored. 3-1 BOS

Bottom 7th:

Jackie Bradley Jr. walked. Rafael Devers scored. 4-1 BOS

Top 8th:

Eloy Jimenez homered to left field. Edwin Encarnacion scored. Yasmani Grandal scored. 4-4
Nomar Mazara homered to right field. 5-4 CHW

Notable performance: Though he may sit just outside of the heart of the White Sox order, Eloy Jimenez has been the team’s top run producer this year. With his three-run homer in the eighth, the young slugger already has 11 RBIs in nine games. That’s the most on the White Sox and tied for ninth in the AL.

Next game: Monday, April 6 - Game 10: Mariners vs. White Sox (Dylan Cease vs. Marco Gonzales)

White Sox 2005 Rewind: Taking ‘finding new ways to win’ to the extreme

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AP

White Sox 2005 Rewind: Taking ‘finding new ways to win’ to the extreme

Baseball’s history is long, so what happened in the bottom of the eighth on May 5, 2005, probably happened before.

But it couldn’t have happened many times.

When you shotgun a season of winning baseball in quick succession, like we’re doing while watching #SoxRewind, it’s easy to notice how good teams are capable of finding so many different ways to win. The White Sox 21st win of the 2005 season took that concept to the extreme.

Zack Greinke dominated the South Side offense through seven innings, allowing just two hits and no runs. Jose Contreras stifled the Royals almost as well, but a home run off the bat of Tony Graffanino in the seventh gave the visitors a 1-0 lead.

The White Sox didn’t get another hit, but they capitalized on some dreadful Royals pitching to grab what had to be one of their more improbable victories in a 99-win season.

Greinke walked Paul Konerko to lead off the bottom of the eighth, and after a sacrifice bunt, Jermaine Dye was hit by a pitch to put the go-ahead run on base. Andy Sisco came in and got Jamie Burke to ground out — he swung at the first pitch — but the wheels quickly fell off. Sisco walked Joe Crede on five pitches to load the bases, and then he walked Juan Uribe on four pitches to force in the tying run.

Uribe didn’t seem to have any intention of swinging, making the plate appearance seem like it would have had the same result had he left his bat in the dugout.

After Sisco got the hook, Ambiorix Burgos entered and promptly walked Scott Podsednik to put the White Sox in front.


Against three straight batters with two runners in scoring position and two outs, including back-to-back with the bases loaded, Royals relievers threw 13 pitches, just one of which was a strike.

Though Tadahito Iguchi struck out to end the inning, the bottom of the eighth went thusly for the White Sox: They scored two runs, flipped a deficit to a lead, sent eight men to the plate, saw five men reach base and got exactly zero hits.

Incredible.

Winning 99 regular-season games and winning a championship takes an awful lot of talent and overmatching of opponents. But it also takes a good amount of good fortune, and this day, the White Sox took advantage of the mistakes of a Royals team that ended up with 106 losses.

And it happened in a way you’ll be hard pressed to witness again.

What else?

— The conditions were right for the White Sox to pull out a win after Contreras dazzled through eight innings of one-run ball. It was his first win of the season and one of his finest performances of 2005. Prior to giving up the seventh-inning home run to Graffanino, he retired 17 of the first 19 batters he faced. Then after giving up the homer and allowing two more base runners in the seventh, he went 1-2-3 in the top of the eighth on just seven pitches.

This was one of five regular-season outings in 2005 in which Contreras went at least eight innings. The other four came in his final eight starts of the year, including in each of his final three.

— Shingo time finally ran out. After the White Sox took the lead in that wacky eighth, the closer didn’t make for an easy save in the ninth. Aaron Rowand made a diving play to get the first out of the inning, but Takatsu followed with back-to-back walks, putting the go-ahead run on base. He got a strikeout of Ken Harvey for Out No. 2, but both runners moved into scoring position on a wild pitch during the next at-bat. Takatsu got Terrence Long to fly out to end the game, but that was far too much of a nail-biter.

Takatsu’s tenure as White Sox closer was over after this game, his final appearance in a save situation as a South Sider.

— That Rowand catch for the first out in the ninth inning? It was fantastic, by the way.


— Goodness, Greinke was good. As discussed the last time we saw the 21-year-old Greinke on #SoxRewind, this was not one of his better seasons. But he looked like the elite pitcher he has since become in this one, all but completely shutting down the White Sox offense. Before starting that ludicrous eighth inning, he tossed seven shutout innings with just two singles allowed. Greinke was seeing this same situation play out over and over again to begin his 2005 season. He was getting no run support, like worse than Jose Quintana levels of run support. The Royals scored a grand total of seven runs in his first five starts coming into this game, then scored one in this game and one in the next, giving Greinke an average of just 1.29 runs per game over his first seven starts of the season.

— Darrin Jackson: “It’s not something you’re going to see very often, Scott Podsednik caught stealing.” Coming into this game, that was certainly the case. The White Sox leadoff hitter, coming off 70 stolen bases with the Brewers in 2004, had 11 swiped bags and had been caught stealing just once in his first 21 contests as a South Sider. But Podsednik actually ended up the major league leader in that category, caught 23 times by the time the regular season wrapped up. Of course, he also stole 59 bases, a total that ranked third in baseball behind Chone Figgins (62) and Jose Reyes (60). He was caught stealing for the second time in the fourth inning of this game.

— As mentioned, Graffanino’s home run accounted for the only Royals run. Graffanino spent four seasons with the White Sox, batting .271 with a .344 on-base percentage. This was one of four home runs he hit against the South Siders in his 13-year major league career.

Next up

#SoxRewind rolls on Monday, when you can catch the May 8, 2005, game against the Blue Jays, starting at 4 p.m. on NBC Sports Chicago. The White Sox bats jumped all over Gustavo Chacin, and Mark Buehrle had just one bumpy inning en route to his fifth win.

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