White Sox

David Robertson earns redemption in return outing at Yankee Stadium

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David Robertson earns redemption in return outing at Yankee Stadium

NEW YORK — David Robertson found some redemption in his return to Yankee Stadium.

Exactly one year after he last pitched here, an outing that ultimately led to one of the cooler moments in Yankees history, the White Sox closer triumphantly closed out a 5-2 victory over the New York Yankees.

Robertson needed only 16 pitches to record his 19th career save at Yankee Stadium, one he hoped to lock down on Sept. 25, 2014. Instead, Robertson blew a three-run lead in the top of the ninth inning against the Baltimore Orioles, and Derek Jeter, who was playing for the final time at Yankee Stadium, won the game with a walkoff single.

“Obviously that was my last outing here at Yankee Stadium, and the baseball gods were against me that day,” Robertson said. “They wanted to see Derek walk off with a base hit. It was a pretty incredible moment.”

[MORE WHITE SOX: Carlos Rodon finishes 2015 strong as White Sox beat Yankees]

Robertson pitched parts of seven seasons with the Yankees before he signed a four-year, $46-million deal with the White Sox this offseason. He said his first appearance back at Yankee Stadium was all business, though he did have fun facing Brett Gardner as the two locked horns until Robertson got his ex-teammate and friend to fly out. Robertson joked that he didn’t think about his previous outing but also acknowledged that it crossed his mind. He didn’t realize the 5-2 score was exactly the same as when he pitched in that contest, too.

At the time, Robertson was more concerned about wrecking Jeter’s last hurrah in The Bronx, saying he went from an “all-time low to an all-time high” when the shortstop singled in the winning run.

Now removed from the experience, Robertson views it a little more enjoyably.

“Looking back on it now, I’m not mad about it at all,” Robertson said. “It stung at the time because I was so worried that I had just blown the game and we were going to go extra innings and Derek’s not going to get called out (of the game) from short and get the applause he deserves in the ninth inning. Instead he got the place to erupt on a walk-off base hit.”

White Sox Talk Podcast: What it would take for the White Sox to sign Manny Machado

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: What it would take for the White Sox to sign Manny Machado

It might be a long shot for the White Sox to sign free agent Manny Machado, but here on the White Sox Talk Podcast, we like dark horses. Chuck Garfien, Ryan McGuffey and Vinnie Duber discuss what it would take to bring Machado to the South Side. Plus, is he "the" guy the White Sox are targeting this offseason? Will the Rockies listen to trade offers for Nolan Arenado a year before he reaches free agency? Plus, Chuck talks about a cost-controlled, All-Star on a rebuilding team that could be an answer at third base.

Listen to the full podcast here or via the embedded player below:

On this day in 2005: White Sox pitchers put the CG in Chicago

On this day in 2005: White Sox pitchers put the CG in Chicago

Mark Buehrle. Jon Garland. Freddy García. José Contreras.

The 2005 White Sox had four consecutive complete games to finish off the 2005 ALCS — Contreras took his turn in Game 5 against the Angels 13 years ago Tuesday. How special was that run of starting pitching to finish that series? Consider the following six statements:

— No team has had more than two complete games in a single postseason, let alone a postseason series, since.

— There has been a grand total of four complete games in 188 postseason games (through Monday) since the beginning of 2016.

— Those 2005 White Sox remain the only team with four complete games in a single LCS (which went to a best-of-seven format in 1985).

— They are the only team since the 1968 Tigers (in the World Series) with at least four complete games in any postseason series.

— They are the only team since the 1956 Yankees (in the World Series) with at least four consecutive complete games in a series. (The Yankees had five in a row: Games 3 through 7.)

— They are the only team since the 1928 Yankees (in the World Series) with at least four consecutive complete-game wins in a series (Games 1 through 4).

Take a moment to look back and appreciate what Don Cooper’s troops were able to accomplish in that series. The way the game is played nowadays, we will never see it again.