White Sox

Fantasy baseball: Velocity check AL Central

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Fantasy baseball: Velocity check AL Central

Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011
Posted: 8:50 p.m.

By Hamilton Bolduc
CSNChicago.com

Thanks to our friends at Fangraphs.com we have the statistical analysis to delve into the value of baseballs hardest throwers. This week were checking out the AL Central.

The division is home to the ALs hardest throwing starter and reliever. The AL Central also sports some of the biggest uncertainties in fantasy baseball and offers two bad hitting teams to boost pitching stats in intradivisional matchups. You'll want your pitchers this year to get as many meetings against the Royals and Indians as possible.

Twins

Starter Francisco Liriano (93.7): Lirianos velocity has steadily climbed since having Tommy John surgery, leading to an increase in his K9 to 9.44 from 7.93 pre-surgery. This season he looks to clear another hurdle the 200-inning mark. He may never be 2006 filthy again, but hell still be a top starter in the AL.

Reliever Matt Capps (94.0): Capps enters the season as the leading candidate to close for the Twins, but much depends on the health of long-time closer Joe Nathan (Tommy John surgery). A healthy Nathan likely makes Capps the setup guy.

TigersStarter Justin Verlander (95.4): Verlanders heat knows no limits. Hes been known to touch the high 90s late into games and is by far the divisions, and baseballs, hardest throwing starter. Verlander has started at least 30 games each year of his career and has topped 200 innings without fail since 2007. Last seasons average velocity and innings pitched were the second highest of his career.

Reliever Joel Zumaya (99.3): None throw harder than Zumaya, but few are as fragile. His rookie season 62 games, 83.1 IP, 6-3, 1 SV, 1.94 ERA, 97 K positioned him to for a meteoric ascension to closer stardom. Last season looked like Zumayas bounce-back year until the horrific fractured right elbow. He may throw too hard for his own good.

White SoxStarter Gavin Floyd (92.4): Hes not overpowering, but he sometimes show 2008 form (17-8, 3.84 ERA, 1.26 WHIP, 206.1 IP), though it consistency alludes him. His K-rate trails his velocity.

Reliever Matt Thornton (96.1): After years of toying with idea of replacing Bobby Jenks, the White Sox brass has finally red-lighted the Matt Thornton Era. Last season was as good as a reliever can be and well finally get to see Thorton have a chance to become a top closer.

RoyalsStarter Kyle Davies (92.6): Kansas Citys acquisition of Jeff Francis means that Davies wont be expected to be the ace of the Royals new staff. But expect Davies to pile up the innings to take the stress of the bullpen. So 200-innings isnt out of the question (183.1 IP was his previous high), but they're unlikely to be of high quality

Reliever Blake Wood (95.4): In Woods first campaign in the majors, he struggled on the road (1.004 OPS allowed). If you cant get Soria, you best stay away from Royals relievers this season.

IndiansStarter Fausto Carmona (92.6): Many believe he peaked in 2007, but last season was his strongest since (13-14, 3.77 ERA, 1.31 WHIP, 210.1 IP). It may not mean much if the Indians do little to support their ace. A fantasy owners best hope is that Cleveland keeps the fire sale going and ships Carmona to a contender.

Reliever Chris Perez (94.6): Perez had an outstanding season as a closer (2-2, 23 SV, 1.71 ERA, 1.08 WHIP) and that figures to continue. Of course the concern with playing on a sub-.500 team is the lack of opportunities. But there's a poor correlation between team wins and save opportunities, so Perez can easily out-perform his price as a second- or third-tier closer.

James McCann leads charge for White Sox in running for starting spots in MLB All-Star Game

James McCann leads charge for White Sox in running for starting spots in MLB All-Star Game

Major League Baseball released a second voting update for All-Star Game starters and three White Sox players are still in the mix.

The top three spots at each position (and top nine in the outfield) are all that matter for now, with those players advancing to MLB’s new Starters Election. James McCann is the only member of the White Sox to sit in one of those spots for now.

McCann is second at catcher behind Gary Sanchez of the Yankees. He is nearly 800,000 votes behind the Yankees backstop.

Jose Abreu was in third in the last update at first base, but has fallen behind Carlos Santana of the Indians. Luke Volt, another Yankee, leads with C.J. Cron of the Twins in second. Santana is just under 43,000 votes ahead of Abreu.

Tim Anderson is still in fourth at shortstop. Jorge Polanco of the Twins and Carlos Correa of the Astros are comfortably in the top two spots. Gleyber Torres, yet another Yankee, is just over 45,000 votes ahead of Anderson for third.

There aren’t any other White Sox within striking distance of the top three. Yoan Moncada remains in eighth among third basemen.

Polls close Friday at 3 p.m. CT.

 

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Breaking down Eloy Jimenez's improvement

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USA TODAY

Breaking down Eloy Jimenez's improvement

When Eloy Jiménez returned from the Injured List in late May and rejoined the White Sox lineup, he went on the road to Houston and Minnesota and he struggled to the tune of a .148 batting average and .148 on-base percentage, with four hits (three went over the fence), 11 strikeouts and no walks.

For the season, his slashline was .217/.259/.406 with five walks and 36 strikeouts. He was swinging at 49.8 percent of all the pitches he saw (a bit above the 46.7 percent league average); he was swinging at 38.8 percent of pitches outside the zone (quite a bit above the 30.9 percent league average).

He returned to the comfort of Guaranteed Rate Field on May 27 and took a pair of walks. From that point forward, things started to look a lot better… and the results were in line with that observation.

Eloy Jiménez this season:

  PA AVG OBP SLG BB K Swing % Outside zone swing %
Through May 26 112 ,217 .259 .406 5 36 49.8 38.8
Since May 27 71 .297 .366 .594 7 18 45.9 30.8

Not only has he improved quite a bit, but that 30.8 outside the zone swing percentage is second only to Yonder Alonso’s 29.9 percent mark among White Sox with at least 40 plate appearances since May 27. Jiménez hasn’t been chasing nearly as many bad pitches lately.

Those pitches he has been laying off of have for the most part been the low and away stuff, as indicated by his swing charts below. First, his swing rates before getting hurt and then since he came back from injury.

These charts are from the catcher’s perspective, and from what you can see, he has done a much better job of laying off the low and away pitches. Look at the three zones furthest low and away. There’s a big difference.

Start of the year through May 26:

Since May 27:

Through May 26 he swung at 33.8 percent of pitches (51 of 151)  low and away and out of the zone. Since May 27 he has swung at 14.5 percent of those pitches (10 of 69).

It’s only an 18-game sample, so there will certainly be more adjustments made to combat Jiménez, but I believe we’re watching Eloy begin to mature into the middle of the order force as he was advertised.

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