White Sox

Five reasons why Pierzynski won't return to the White Sox

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Five reasons why Pierzynski won't return to the White Sox

Nothing is final at such an early juncture in the offseason, but it appears A.J. Pierzynski will play for another team next season.

The free agent-catcher -- an eight-year White Sox veteran -- has indicated a strong desire to return to the South Side in 2013. The franchise has also reciprocated the sentiment: general manager Rick Hahn wants to retain the clubs only World Series-winning catcher in the past 88 seasons.

But even though both sides have good intentions, several mitigating factors could combine to interfere with a reunion. Heres a look at those five reasons:

1 -- Limited payroll

The White Sox dont have unlimited resources. With a payroll expected to be in the 97-100 million range, Hahns hands are hardly tied. But the team has already committed 89.25 million for nine players and several under contract -- Alejandro De Aza, Gordon Beckham and Dayan Viciedo -- could earn another 7 million after arbitration and raises. At the minimum, the teams other 13 players on the 25-man roster would cost 6.5 million, which leaves little room for another expensive player.

2 -- Raise due

Pierzynski earned 6 million in 2012 in the final season of a two-year, 8-million deal he signed before 2011. He also he hit 27 home runs and drove in 77 RBIs, career-high figures. With a lack of options on the free-agent market behind the plate -- a premium position -- Pierzynski is due a significant raise. After he cut a deal to return in 2011, and as this figures to be his last big money contract, the 35-year-old wants a fair deal, which will be costly. On Saturday, Boston gave 35-year-old David Ross, a career backup catcher, a two-year deal for 6.2 million.

3 -- Viable replacement

With an average of 133 12 games played the past eight seasons, Pierzynski is a proven, durable commodity behind the dish. His willingness to play through injury and ability to speak his mind have value in the clubhouse that cannot be measured.

But the White Sox believe they can ably replace Pierzynski with Tyler Flowers. Though Flowers, who turns 27 in January, has played only 108 games in the major leagues, the team is high on his receiving ability, arm and believes he is capable of hitting 15-20 home runs -- all at or just above the major-league minimum.

4 -- Priority

Pierzynski played a significant role last season for a team that was in the race for the American League Central title until the final two games of the season. He won the Silver Slugger award earlier this week for his offensive performance. But catcher isnt the only position where the White Sox have an opening this season and their need at third base is much greater because they have Flowers. With Brent Morels health still in question and the team not in favor of Dayan Viciedos return to the hot corner, the White Sox will likely need to bring in a free agent -- perhaps Kevin Youkilis -- or acquire a player through trade before they worry about their catching situation.

5 -- Timing

Pierzynski has to be viewed as the top option behind the plate along with the Texas Rangers Mike Napoli. The rest of the free-agent class offers few starters and none with the offensive abilities of Pierzynski. What that means is Pierzynski wont have to wait around for a catching market to be established. Though it is early in the offseason, Pierzynski should receive strong interest and could be signed before the White Sox have an opportunity to resolve the hole at third base.

As Hahn said earlier this month, nothing is final when it comes to a teams own free agents. Sentimentality can factor in as well and either party could potentially bend to bring Pierzynski back to the South Side. White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf made sure such a reunion happened in 2011 when he got involved at the last minute, sources have confirmed. But it will likely take another such intervention or Pierzynski again agreeing to take less for him to call 35th Street his baseball home once again.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Manny Machado Mania

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: Manny Machado Mania

Manny Machado to the White Sox?? It's been the dream for many White Sox fans for months.

With Machado in town to the play the White Sox, Chuck Garfien and Vinnie Duber discuss the White Sox chances of signing the soon-to-be-free agent.

Garfien also talks with Nicky Delmonico who played with Machado and fellow free agent to be Bryce Harper on the U.S.A. 18-under national team.

Listen to the full episode at this link or in the embedded player below:

Rick Renteria issues another benching after Welington Castillo doesn't hustle on popup

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USA TODAY

Rick Renteria issues another benching after Welington Castillo doesn't hustle on popup

One thing you better do if you play for Rick Renteria is run to first base.

Yet again, Renteria benched one of his players Monday for the sin of not hustling down the line.

Welington Castillo, a veteran, not a developing player in need of ample “learning experiences,” popped up to first base with two runners on and nobody out in the sixth inning of Monday’s eventual 3-2 loss to the visiting Baltimore Orioles. He did not run down to first, instead staying at home plate.

So when the inning ended and the White Sox took the field, Castillo stayed in the dugout.

Ricky’s boys don’t quit, or so the slogan goes. But what happens when a player doesn’t live up to that mantra? What happens when they don’t play their absolute hardest for all 27 outs, as the T-shirts preach? This is what happens. A benching.

“It was towering fly ball in the infield at first, probably had 15, 20 seconds of hangtime,” Renteria explained after the game. “I assumed the dropped ball. It has occurred. He could, at minimum, at least start moving that way.

“That’s uncharacteristic of him, to be honest, it truly is. Maybe he was just frustrated in that he had the fly ball and just stayed at the plate, but there was no movement toward first at all. And you guys have heard me talk to all the guys about at least giving an opportunity to move in that particular direction.

“Everybody says, ‘Well, 99 out of (100) times he’s going to catch that ball.’ And then that one time that he doesn’t, what would I do if the ball had been dropped? Would it have made it easier to pull him? Well, it was just as easy because you expect not the best, but the worst.

“That is uncharacteristic of that young man. I had a quick conversation with him on the bench, and he knew and that was it.”

It might seem a little overdramatic, a little nutty, even, to sit down a veteran catcher brought in this offseason to provide some offense and to do it in a one-run game. But this rebuild is about more than just waiting around for the minor league talent to make its way to the South Side. It’s about developing an organizational culture, too. And Renteria feels that if he lets this kind of thing slide at the big league level, that won’t send the right message to those precious prospects who will one day fill out this lineup.

“There’s one way to do it, you get your action, you start moving toward that direction in which you’ve got to go,” Renteria said. “What would’ve happened if everybody’s watching it — and I’m setting the tone for not only here, our club, (but also for) everybody in the minor leagues — and they’re saying, ‘Well, at the top, they said they’re going to do this and then they don’t do it.’

“It’s really simple. And people might like it, not like it. I’ve got to do this, do that so everybody understands what we’re trying to do here. We’re not done with what we’re trying to do.”

This isn’t the first time this has happened in 2018. Avisail Garcia was taken out of a game during spring training for not giving maximum effort. Leury Garcia was removed from a game earlier this month for not busting it down the first-base line on a weak grounder that went right to the first baseman.

It’s become a somewhat common tactic for Renteria, and while it might strike some as taking things a little too seriously, what good is this developmental season if a culture goes undeveloped? The White Sox have placed their bright future, in part, in Renteria’s hands, and they’ve talked glowingly about how the players have bought into his style and how the team played last season under his leadership.

If Renteria truly is the right man for the rebuild, things like this are how he’s going to establish his culture. And it will, he hopes, impact how all those prospects play when they’re no longer prospects and the White Sox are contending for championships.