White Sox

Last-place White Sox ready to trade, but only if the right offer arises

Last-place White Sox ready to trade, but only if the right offer arises

That the White Sox lost their fourth consecutive game doesn’t change the big picture plans of the franchise, which probably — but not definitely — will involve making at least one trade before the end of July.

Before the White Sox lost, 6-5, to the New York Yankees Monday at Guaranteed Rate Field, general manager Rick Hahn met with the media and delivered the same message he’s had since trading away Chris Sale and Adam Eaton in December. The White Sox are open for business, and would like to make a number of moves to further bolster their farm system, but won’t make a trade if they don’t receive what they view to be a fair return.

“Would I be surprised (if we didn’t make a trade)? No, because I try not to be surprised by the dynamics of this market,” Hahn said. “Would I be mildly disappointed? Sure. We are here to try to improve this club.

“We feel we have certain first and desirable players that would help other clubs and may fit better on their competitive windows then they do on ours right now. And we intend to be active each day in trying to further accomplish what we set out to do a year ago at this time.

“But do we have to do it? No. That would be using an artificial spot on the calendar to force decision-making. That would be the last thing we need to do. We need to take a long term view of what we are trying to accomplish.”

Hahn didn’t name names, but Todd Frazier, Melky Cabrera, David Robertson could be short-term fixes for contending clubs. Jose Quintana, who will start Tuesday against the Yankees, remains the team’s most valuable trade chip despite a 4.69 ERA that sits over run higher than his career average.

Frazier homered Monday and entered the game hitting .262/.351/.524 since Memorial Day. Cabrera similarly has found success after a slow start, slashing a healthy .324/.375/.482 in his previous 34 games before picking up two hits in four at-bats Monday. And Robertson, who’s been linked to the relief-starved Washington Nationals for months, has 41 strikeouts in 27 1/3 innings with 11 saves.

“We want to be able to do as much as we can in our power to get this team to where it needs to be,” Hahn said. “Yes, there’s an element of competitiveness involved in that. There’s an element of patience involved in that. But at the end of the day, we have to — we get paid to be prudent in our decision making. We have to make the right decision.”

In the meantime, the White Sox looked the part of a rebuilding team with the worst record in the American League on Monday. Starter David Holmberg struggled, allowing six runs on five hits and four walks in 5 1/3 innings — but only two of those runs were earned thanks to errors by Holmberg, Frazier and Matt Davidson.

As the Yankees took advantage of those miscues with three runs in both the fourth and sixth innings, Jordan Montgomery retired nine consecutive White Sox batters and went on to cruise with eight strikeouts over seven innings. The White Sox – as they’ve done quite a bit this year – still showed fight late, battling back in the ninth inning.

Tim Anderson ripped a three-run home run in the ninth inning off Yankees left-hander Chasen Shreve to bring the White Sox within two. Joe Girardi quickly turned to Aroldis Chapman, who allowed a run when Jose Abreu doubled home Melky Cabrera. But the tying run was stranded on second when Avisail Garcia grounded out and Frazier flew out to end the game.

White Sox test drive MLB's new extra-inning rule, and it doesn't look great

White Sox test drive MLB's new extra-inning rule, and it doesn't look great

"The runner on second,” White Sox reliever Aaron Bummer said last week, “I'm not a fan of at all.”

It’s not difficult to see why.

The White Sox took Major League Baseball’s new extra-inning rule for a test drive during Monday’s intrasquad game at Guaranteed Rate Field, and it’s not great.

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I’m no old-school baseball purist. Games are too long, and the league isn’t wrong to try to figure out a way to speed them up. In this case, it’s an attempt to get the game to finish up rather than speed up. And innovation, especially in this most unusual of seasons, should not be turned away.

But I’m not sure this one is a winner. In fact, it’s going to make a loser out of a lot of pitchers, hence their displeasure.

Here’s how we saw it play out Monday.

The White Sox started an inning by trotting Danny Mendick out to second base. Luis Basabe was supposed to bunt him over to third base, what he and many others would be asked to do in the same situation during the regular season. Basabe couldn’t get the bunt down, striking out while trying, but the White Sox made believe that it worked, moving Mendick to third with one out. It allowed for the infield and the pitcher, Jimmy Cordero, to practice for the real thing.

Nick Madrigal was up next and pretty much did what he was supposed to, smoking a line drive. But a drawn-in Leury García made a great play at second base, snagging the liner and keeping Mendick from scoring. The White Sox practiced some more, making a high-stakes pitching change by bringing in Steve Cishek, someone who likely will find himself trying to wriggle out of such a situation come the regular season. Cishek gave up a floater of a base hit to Nicky Delmonico, and the run scored.

Now, soft contact turning a game on its head is nothing new for baseball, and it’s just bad luck pitchers have to deal with. But the point is that through no fault of the pitcher — not even bad luck — it resulted in a run.

And that’s where it’s easy to finding a decent sized flaw in this new extra-inning setup. By starting all extra innings with a runner on second base, the pitcher is in an immediate jam. This is the idea, of course, to increase the chance of a tie-breaking run scoring and the game coming to a quicker conclusion. But nothing had to happen to get to that point.

Let’s say a low-scoring game spins into extras. Congratulations, pitchers, on keeping the opposing offenses in check. Your reward is a runner in scoring position. Get out of it.

RELATED: White Sox staff leader Lucas Giolito ready to rock, hopeful for multiple aces

It’s an interesting challenge, and the upside of this rule — outside of the game not lasting five hours, obviously — is increased drama. The situation suddenly becomes as tense as can be, and every move a manager makes to try to keep that run off the board becomes a high pressure one. In a season where players are already preparing for every game to matter in a 60-game sprint to the playoffs, one game in the standings could wind up a huge deal.

But while late-game skippering is fun to watch, will it be as fun without the build-up? It’s one thing if a leadoff man comes through and doubles to start the 10th, putting pressure on the pitcher and the defense. It’s another thing when he’s there at second base and the pitcher — nor the base runner — did anything but show up.

“is there a difference between being here for three and a half hours versus four hours for a game?” Bummer said. “That's for someone else to make a decision that's a whole lot smarter than I am. But I'm not necessarily a fan of that. I think that's when you start messing with the integrity of the game.”

Even the guy who has to do the strategizing isn’t looking forward to it.

“That’s something I’m sure everyone is excited about trying. I’ll be honest, I’m not,” White Sox manager Rick Renteria said last month. “I’ll just lay it out there. I’m glad everyone is going to enjoy something new. ‘We want to tie in some excitement.’ I’m more of a traditionalist.

“I would have rather just had — my own opinion is, and I put this out there years ago, and I’ll get myself in trouble — just play an 11-inning game and figure out some way of creating a point system. If you’re tied after that, you use a mechanism that gives you the ability to create something that gives you some form of differentiating yourself from other clubs that end up having the same type of record or whatnot. Then we just play the game and it ends when it ends.”

Bringing this rule in for the 2020 season makes sense from a health-and-safety standpoint. Playing in the middle of the pandemic, the idea is to keep players in close proximity to one another for as little time as possible. Extra innings can drag a game on forever, and that’s not what you want in these circumstances.

But this has been in the works longer than the pandemic’s been around, with the rule used in the minor leagues last year. It’s one of the proposals to shrink game times that have been stretched out by more pitching changes and more selective hitters. The days of Mark Buehrle breezing through a game and getting everyone home for a late dinner are history. So the league is taking matters into its own hands.

RELATED: Michael Kopech's 2020 absence won't sink deep White Sox pitching staff

Some things will work. Some things won’t. Some won’t make a difference. No drastic changes seemed to come from the restrictions on the number of mound visits. Nobody seems to pay much attention to the between-inning countdown clocks in every ballpark. We’ll see what effect the three-batter minimum, another new one for 2020, has on the parade of pitching changes. My prediction? It will lead to a bevy of two-out pitching changes.

But none of those new ideas take the pitching and the hitting out of the players’ hands like the new extra-inning rule does. Changes to baseball are just fine, as long as you’re still playing baseball. In this instance, you’re literally removing the pitcher-vs.-hitter essence of things by skipping ahead to the runner in scoring position.

A saving grace? Maybe this won’t be too much of a brave new world for relief pitchers, who tend to be called on to strand runners on a fairly regular basis.

“Relievers, they train for that situation, guys come in with bases loaded, nobody out. So it's just kind of treating it like that,” White Sox pitcher Lucas Giolito said Monday. “You're coming in to do your job, execute pitches, get out of the situation. I think if you worry too much about that runner being there, that's when you can get into trouble. I trust that our guys know how to handle that.”


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Lucas Giolito faces Nick Madrigal, Andrew Vaughn: 'They're a pain in my ass'

Lucas Giolito faces Nick Madrigal, Andrew Vaughn: 'They're a pain in my ass'

The White Sox are hoping Lucas Giolito's assessment of pitching against two of the organization's top prospects is shared by opposing hurlers for years to come.

"They're a pain in my ass."

The White Sox would be thrilled if Nick Madrigal and Andrew Vaughn are the same kinds of irritants to the rest of the American League that they were to Giolito during Monday's intrasquad game on the South Side. It wasn't so much the results — though both were involved in a busy first inning for Giolito, with Madrigal making things happen on the base paths and scoring on a Yasmani Grandal throwing error — but the at-bats themselves that challenged the All Star.

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Opening Day might come with neither of the two first-round picks on the active roster. But they're both big parts of the White Sox long-term plans. And if Giolito's reviews are any indication, they might be ready to tangle with major league pitchers right now.

"You've got Nick spitting on some fastballs just out of the zone (that's taking tough pitches, in baseball lingo, for those afraid Madrigal was violating MLB's spitting ban), shooting one to right field. Andrew Vaughn, when I was throwing to him in quarantine — back when we were in California, I was throwing live bullpens, and he faced me — he's one of the few guys, I've noticed, that can really see my changeup well, and he'll spit on my changeup just out of the zone," Giolito said. "That makes me excited that they're on our team and I don't have to face them in the future because they're tough outs."

Indeed, both Madrigal and Vaughn are promising young players, and that has plenty of fans clamoring they be thrust into the majors as soon as possible, hopeful their presence will help fuel the White Sox quest for a postseason berth in 2020. Madrigal can very easily be described as the organization's best second baseman, at any level, and Vaughn sure looks capable of handling a bat at any level, especially after he took one of the White Sox veteran free-agent additions, Gio González, deep in Sunday's intrasquad tilt.

But the White Sox have been consistent during this rebuilding process in taking their time with their highest rated prospects. Fans stewed while the team waited for the right moment to bring Michael Kopech, Eloy Jiménez and Luis Robert to the majors. It wouldn't be surprising, even as they move out of rebuilding mode and into contending mode, for the White Sox to treat Madrigal and Vaughn the same way.

Madrigal's case is the most interesting, as he was set to be the team's second baseman for the bulk of the season but still had things he needed to show team brass in the minor leagues. Now, there's no minor league season and the major league season has been squeezed down to 60 games. Service-time rules are still in effect, too. So what do the White Sox do with Madrigal? It depends how far along they believe he is and whether he helps them more in this short, weird season or in a hopefully normal season in 2021. Seemingly the most likely outcome: He arrives about a week or so into the 2020 season.

Vaughn's situation is less complicated. He doesn't have what Madrigal has on his resume: a full season of success at various levels of the minor league system. And even though he's been playing a little bit of third base during "Summer Camp," he's probably not being groomed as an emergency replacement for Yoán Moncada, currently on the injured list. Instead, the White Sox are keeping him versatile. After all, Vaughn's regular position, first base, figures to be occupied for a while after José Abreu signed a new three-year contract over the winter. Edwin Encarnación is expected to soak up the majority of at-bats at designated hitter this season, and the White Sox have an option for his services in 2021, too. Keeping Vaughn as versatile as possible while those two proven vets are still on the roster makes all the sense in the world.

RELATED: White Sox staff leader Lucas Giolito ready to rock, hopeful for multiple aces

This might just be "Summer Camp," but the White Sox future is on display.

"It’s been phenomenal," Vaughn said Monday. "Our lineup this year is pretty stacked. Just watching those guys hit, Abreu, Encarnación, (Tim Anderson), I mean it’s pretty phenomenal being around those guys. Just trying to see how I fit in.

"The goal, always, since I was drafted was to play in the big leagues, doesn’t matter when, as soon as possible is kind of the goal. I’m just going day by day, especially in these times, put one foot ahead of the other and continue to play baseball."

The White Sox seem ready to take the next step this year, with an exciting core of Giolito, Moncada, Anderson and Jiménez teamed with the offseason additions of Grandal, Encarnación and Dallas Keuchel, not to mention the Day 1 arrival of Robert, the organization's top-ranked prospect. But the plan has always been chasing championships on an annual basis over the duration of a lengthy contention window. Madrigal and Vaughn are part of keeping that window propped open for a long time, their team-control clocks not even started yet.

"There’s a lot of excitement here, there’s a lot of excitement within this clubhouse right now and within this organization and rightfully so," White Sox bench coach Joe McEwing said Monday. "Done an outstanding job to put pieces in place so that we’re able, not just to be able to sustain it for the next couple of years, but for years to come.

"We’re excited for years to come. It’s going to be pretty special."

So while its still unknown what kind of an impact Madrigal and Vaughn will make in 2020, it won't be long before they're persistent pains in the asses of pitchers all over the Junior Circuit.


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