White Sox

Lorenzo Cain on Jeff Samardzija: 'I'm not a big fan'

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Lorenzo Cain on Jeff Samardzija: 'I'm not a big fan'

The Kansas City Star reported that Kansas City Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura was “contrite and apologetic” for his part in a brawl Thursday that resulted in five ejections, including his own.

Royals manager Ned Yost said his postgame message for Ventura talked about better controlling his emotions. The right-hander has already been involved in several high-profile incidents this season, including one with Brett Lawrie and the Oakland A’s last weekend.

[NBC SPORTS SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]

“He’s a young guy,” Yost said. “I had trouble learning how to control my emotions when I was young. It’s something you’ve got to continue to work on. It just comes out. He’s a competitive guy, and it just comes out. He’s going to be focused on trying to control his emotions better from here on out.”

But not everyone wearing a Kansas City uniform was as diplomatic. Lorenzo Cain, who also was ejected, isn’t fond of White Sox pitcher Jeff Samardzija, who hit the outfielder on Opening Day. Samardzija could be seen charging into the massive pile twice, including once in Cain’s direction.

[MORE: White Sox describe brawl that led to five ejections]

“I’m not a big fan,” Cain said. “I’m not a big fan of him. I don’t know what the deal is. We’re just going to try to clean it up and get ready to play some baseball tomorrow. We’ll see what happens.”

At one point, Yost was face to face with Chris Sale, who also got ejected as did Royals pitcher Edinson Volquez. Yost also found himself at the bottom of the pile as did third-base coach Mike Jirschele after Samardzija raced into a crowd.

"It felt like there was 20 guys sitting on top of me for a little while,” Yost said.

[MORE: White Sox Adam Eaton: 'I respect the hell out of that team']

Yost did add he didn’t feel Sale intended to hit Mike Moustakas with a 0-2 pitch in the fifth inning. Sale’s hit batsmen came an inning after Ventura struck Jose Abreu and plate ump Sam Holbrook immediately issued warnings to both benches.

White Sox Talk Podcast: What it would take for the White Sox to sign Manny Machado

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: What it would take for the White Sox to sign Manny Machado

It might be a long shot for the White Sox to sign free agent Manny Machado, but here on the White Sox Talk Podcast, we like dark horses. Chuck Garfien, Ryan McGuffey and Vinnie Duber discuss what it would take to bring Machado to the South Side. Plus, is he "the" guy the White Sox are targeting this offseason? Will the Rockies listen to trade offers for Nolan Arenado a year before he reaches free agency? Plus, Chuck talks about a cost-controlled, All-Star on a rebuilding team that could be an answer at third base.

Listen to the full podcast here or via the embedded player below:

On this day in 2005: White Sox pitchers put the CG in Chicago

On this day in 2005: White Sox pitchers put the CG in Chicago

Mark Buehrle. Jon Garland. Freddy García. José Contreras.

The 2005 White Sox had four consecutive complete games to finish off the 2005 ALCS — Contreras took his turn in Game 5 against the Angels 13 years ago Tuesday. How special was that run of starting pitching to finish that series? Consider the following six statements:

— No team has had more than two complete games in a single postseason, let alone a postseason series, since.

— There has been a grand total of four complete games in 188 postseason games (through Monday) since the beginning of 2016.

— Those 2005 White Sox remain the only team with four complete games in a single LCS (which went to a best-of-seven format in 1985).

— They are the only team since the 1968 Tigers (in the World Series) with at least four complete games in any postseason series.

— They are the only team since the 1956 Yankees (in the World Series) with at least four consecutive complete games in a series. (The Yankees had five in a row: Games 3 through 7.)

— They are the only team since the 1928 Yankees (in the World Series) with at least four consecutive complete-game wins in a series (Games 1 through 4).

Take a moment to look back and appreciate what Don Cooper’s troops were able to accomplish in that series. The way the game is played nowadays, we will never see it again.