White Sox

White Sox

Major League Baseball is putting its foot down. Steroids and performance-enhancing drugs have begun to plague the game of baseball but Commissioner Bud Selig will attempt to prevent any further damage.

According to the New York Times, the new collective bargaining agreement will include blood testing for human growth hormone (HGH). This is one of those "One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind" type of deals for Selig considering baseball will be the first major North American professional sport to conduct any type of blood testing to unionized players.

There's no doubt Selig is giving himself a nice pat on the back and will now walk around with quite the chip on his shoulder seeing as though he's done what the NFL wasn't able to do.

The NFL and its union tried to include blood testing for HGH in their CBA last summer but players refused to sign off. Their main concern being that the natural level of HGH in football players might be higher than that of the general population, causing too many players to unfairly test positive.

There are definitely other arguments and ways around this, but that's a whole other issue, considering baseball players aren't the "general population," are they?

Selig brought HGH testing to the minor leagues in 2010 and first at bat was Mike Jacobs, a first baseman in the Colorado Rockies' organization. Jacobs was the first minor league player to test positive for HGH. Not necessarily a great milestone to have on your resume.

 

Under the new agreement, testing would begin in February when players report to spring training. Players who test positive will face a 50-game suspension.

This move shows how important it is to Selig to treat the issue of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball. What do you think about the tests? Should other leagues follow in the MLB's footsteps?