White Sox

MLB Power Rankings: Week 3

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MLB Power Rankings: Week 3

Every Monday throughout the regular season, we'll be ranking all 30 MLB teams -- take a look and offer up your thoughts in the comments or to us on twitter @CubsTalkCSN or @WhiteSoxTalkCSN.

Previous rankings: Preseason Week 1 Week 2

Tony
JJ Comments 1

Tony: Simply dominating. Offense is cray.
JJ: Hamilton slugging 103 points higher than Napoli, who's at .673.
2

Tony: Can't fall if they keep winning series.
JJ: Yadier Molina looks like a legit offensive threat.
3

Tony: Need to find more consistency.
JJ: Stephen Strasburg Productions presents baseball in the groin.
4

Tony: Holy cow, can they pitch.
JJ: Not a great run differential.
5

Tony: They can still bring the hammer on offense.
JJ: Scored 90 runs; still care too much about Jesus Montero.
6

Tony: Kemp, Ethier an awesome 1-2 punch right now.
JJ: Freddie Freeman fuels fantastic flurry of runs.
7

Tony: Just wait 'til Matt Moore gets going.
JJ: Haven't been super impressive, but very solid.
8

Tony: Almost got swept by the A's? Yu serious, bro?
JJ: Matt Kemp? Yeah, he's good.
9

Tony: Still love these Canadians.
JJ: Someday, Albert Pujols will homer, and they'll take off.
10

Tony: What hurts more, the Lee injury or an MWP elbow?
JJ: Living proof that pitcher W-L records are meaningless.
11

Tony: Doing great...until they choke late again.
JJ: Things are looking up with great pitching, Dunn succeeding.
12

Tony: Can we call the AL playoff race the Humber Games?
JJ: Bad pitching, okay offense. Still think they're average.
13

Tony: Hudson's DL stint will really hurt.
JJ: West looks wide open this year.
14

Tony: Stellar lefties abound in lineup and bullpen.
JJ: Lincecum has a 10.54 ERA and 3.38 FIP. He'll be okay.
15

Tony: Will go as far as their rotation will take them.
JJ: Pitching allowing too many homers.
16

Tony: Nothin' special right now.
JJ: Not gonna pass Detroit, but will be pesky.
17

Tony: Can any pro sports team match this mess & drama?
JJ: Offense has been putrid - only three teams have lower OBPs.
18

Tony: They'll hang around in AL Central.
JJ: Top-10 offense, bottom-5 pitching so far.
19

Tony: Have won three straight series.
JJ: Finally starting to put some things together.
20

Tony: Just wait 'til Ike Davis gets going.
JJ: 2.99 team ERA, .284 team OBP.
21

Tony: Could challenge Boston for drama before 2012 is over.
JJ: Pitching has been surprisingly good.
22

Tony: Where would they be if they just scored runs?
JJ: This may be as high as they'll be ranked this year.
23

Tony: How have they hung around this long?
JJ: Seriously. Enter Monday with a 10 run differential.
24

Tony: Moneyball is kinda money so far.
JJ: No team has allowed more runs than them, and it's not close. 25

Tony: Mauer, Morneau looking like old.
JJ: Only Texas has allowed fewer runs, but they can't score.
26

Tony: Still think they're better than record.
JJ: Have scored double the runs of Pittsburgh.
27

Tony: SP Luebke becoming piece to build around.
JJ: -22 run differential worst in NL. 28

Tony: Sigh. I feel for Kansas City.
JJ: Well, I guess there's nowhere to go but up after Saturday.
29

Tony: Their offenses is just offensive.
JJ: Eat away your sorrows at Stroud'sOklahoma Joe's.
30

Tony: How in the name of Jeff Bagwell do they have six wins?
JJ: Liriano, pitching staff an absolute mess.

Suspended catcher Welington Castillo working his way back to White Sox with minor league rehab stint

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USA TODAY

Suspended catcher Welington Castillo working his way back to White Sox with minor league rehab stint

With about a week until the end of his 80-game suspension, Welington Castillo his making his way back to the White Sox.

The veteran catcher joined Triple-A Charlotte for a rehab assignment Friday, in the Knights' lineup for their afternoon game.

Castillo has been serving his suspension since May 24, when Major League Baseball handed down its punishment for his testing positive for a banned substance. He's eligible to return Aug. 23, just nine days before rosters expand.

The White Sox added Castillo over the offseason after he had career years offensively and defensively with the Baltimore Orioles during the 2017 season. The hope was he could provide a veteran presence and help out with the development of the team's young pitching staff — and of course that his bat could help bolster the team's everyday lineup. A two-year contract with an option for a third meant that if all went well, Castillo could be around for the start of the team's transition from rebuilding to contending, a sort of bridge to top catching prospect Zack Collins.

Things obviously did not work out as planned, and Castillo has missed months of time working with the pitchers while he's served his suspension.

Still, his return will perhaps be a welcome help to young pitchers still learning how to succeed against major league lineups, guys like Lucas Giolito and Reynaldo Lopez, who have had inconsistent first full campaigns in the big leagues — not to mention any young pitchers who might be called up from the minor leagues over the season's final month and a half.

As for the team's catching situation, Omar Narvaez has done very well at the plate since taking over as the starting catcher when Castillo was suspended. Since the beginning of June, Narvaez is slashing .356/.433/.559, and his season batting average of .282 is one of the highest on the team. Kevan Smith, the No. 2 catcher, is hitting .283 on the season. Castillo will return with a .267/.309/.466 slash line in 33 games he played in before being suspended.

Despite midseason slump, Jose Abreu is moving toward a fifth straight season of 25 homers and 100 RBIs

Despite midseason slump, Jose Abreu is moving toward a fifth straight season of 25 homers and 100 RBIs

When Jose Abreu went to the All-Star Game — voted in as the starting first baseman for the American League squad — he was of course deserving as an incredibly consistent performer through his first four seasons in the big leagues and his role as the face of the White Sox.

But the numbers weren't looking so good in mid July. An extended slump had Abreu looking very un-Abreu-like, perhaps heading toward his worst statistical season since arriving in the majors from Cuba ahead of his 2014 Rookie of the Year campaign.

At the close of the first half, he was slashing .253/.311/.441 with 13 home runs and 52 RBIs, a far cry from the .301/.359/.524 slash line he put up through his first four seasons, when he also joined Albert Pujols and Joe DiMaggio as the only players ever to start their careers with a quartet of 25-homer, 100-RBI campaigns.

But Abreu, who's been a very good second-half hitter during his career, is on a hot streak that's powering his way back to his version of normal. And it's looking like he could again reach the numbers we're so used to seeing from him by season's end.

After a one-homer, three-hit, three-RBI day in Wednesday afternoon's win over the Detroit Tigers, Abreu is up to .268/.327/.484 on the campaign with 21 homers and 73 RBIs. That puts him nine homers and 27 RBIs away from the mark he's hit in each of his first four seasons with 42 games left in the season. It's not at all unreasonable to suggest he'll be able to do that, as he's hit eight homers and driven in 21 runs in his last 22 games.

He'd have to be some kind of dialed-in for the remainder of 2018 to bump the averages back to where they've been in recent seasons. But here's the kind of hot streak he's on now: Since the start of the second half, Abreu is slashing .323/.385/.646. And that's not too crazy when you realize how good he's been in the second half in his career. Coming into Wednesday's game, his career second-half stat line looked like this: a .314/.381/.540 slash line with 61 homers and 199 RBIs in 303 games.

For the White Sox, the confidence was always there that Abreu was going to snap out of the extended slump that saw him slash .180/.230/.308 from May 27 to the end of the first half, and he's done exactly that. Now, he's hot enough that he's inspiring confidence he could return to some of his regular numbers by season's end. It's that kind of consistency, coupled with his off-the-field value, that makes the team think so highly of him and could keep him around long enough for the rebuilding process to yield a perennial contender on the South Side.