White Sox

Ozzie gets the boot; Sox stymied by Colon

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Ozzie gets the boot; Sox stymied by Colon

Wednesday, April 27, 2011
Posted: 8:27 p.m. Updated: 9:49 p.m.

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

NEW YORKChicago White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen, never one to pass up an opportunity for a joke, mocked his former starter before Wednesdays game, turning a question about a pitchers duel into a crack on the portly hurler.

Bartolo Colon showed up today? Guillen asked. You guys are very lucky. I thought Bartolo never showed up to the ballpark.

Guillen was referring to Colons misbegotten 2009 season on the South Side, when Colon was out of shape and injured, eventually disappearing from the clubhouse completely and leaving no forwarding address.

Well, Colon had the last laugh in an eight-inning effort that sparked a 3-1 win for his New York Yankees. The righthander fired fastball after fastball in the mid 90s-plus, holding the White Sox to seven scattered hits, striking out six and walking one.

Thats the best Ive seen him throw, velocity-wise, movement, White Sox starter Mark Buehrle said. Hes always had that movement, but velocity-wise, seeing some sinkers hes throwing that were pretty much unhittable pitcheswe are obviously going out there battling, but thats the best Ive seen him throw. Of the last couple of years he was in the big leagues and so far this year, thats the best hes thrown.

Colon was amazing, Guillen raved. Colon was, wow. I thought Don Cooper was a pretty good pitching coach. I dont remember seeing Colon throwing that good since Cleveland or when he was pitching in Anaheim. I had a very good opportunity to watch the game on TV and it was amazing how that ball had a lot of movement. Buehrle pitched very good, but Colon pitched better. I tip my hat to him. I feel proud of him.

Guillen, as he acknowledged, wasnt around to appreciate Colons masterpiecefrom the dugout, at least. In the first inning, with Carlos Quentin on second after his team-record 13th double of April, Paul Konerko was punched out on strikes to conclude a controversial sequenceand one that would end Guillens night early.

At 1-2, Colon threw a ball to Konerko that had the Yankees up in arms. Guillen advised home plate umpire Todd Tichenor not to be intimidated by the home howlers.

When the next pitch, a fastball a shade south of the knees, erased the Captain, both player and manager got hot.

Tichenor didnt hear what I said when I was shouting from the dugout, Guillen explained. He was upset and I was upset and everything blow up. Thats it. I said something in the dugout, and then as soon as I went out on the field, he ejected me When he approached me and I said what I had to say, he ejected me. He was right to eject me, but he didnt hear what I was saying.

According to those in the White Sox dugout, Tichenor told Guillen not to step onto the field, and when Guillen didclearly wanting to speak his piece privately to the umpirehe was ejected.

I was kind of laughing, because I was doing some warmup pitches and Tichenor gets down to see warmup pitches and Guillens right there, Buehrle smiled. I didnt know if I wanted to throw another pitch or not. I dont really know what happened. The next thing I knew, Guillen was thrown out and was going at him, but thats part of the game.

Crew Chief Gerry Davis, manning first base and eventually intervening in the very heated argument at home plate, told a pool reporter that Guillen was ejected for profanity directed at an umpire while arguing balls and strikes. Interestingly, Davis contradicted Guillens claims of being ignored, saying that Tichenor told him that hed heard what Guillen said from the dugout.

Guillens only impatience of the postgame came when asked about his tweets, as the manager sent two messages from the clubhouse after his ejection. The first, some 13 minutes into the game, read, This one going to cost me a lot money this is patetic. Guillens follow-up came six minutes later, in apparent reference to Tichenor: Today a tough guy show up a yankee stadium.

When asked about his tweets postgame, Guillen snapped, either angry at himself for causing a sideshowall of baseball was re-tweeting Guillens rageor reprimanded internally for stirring the pot post-ejection.

Im not worried about that, Guillen spat. Lets talk about f------ baseball. F--- tweeting.

There was a game still ongoing, although it was over early, as a three-run bomb from Robinson Cano off of Buehrle in the first was the only support Colon would need for the win. The lefthander, who has scuffled more than any other White Sox starter out of the box, acquitted himself well with seven innings, six hits, three earned runs, and five strikeouts against two walks.

Quentin provided the only offense for Chicago, going 3-3, scoring the clubs only run, and reaching base all four times at-bat. The rest of his White Sox teammates reached base just five times total.

The anemic offensive effortjust one in a line of flat results against not just opposing aces but the supposed hittables of the league, like Brad Penny and Colon himselfwas nothing new. Chicago has now failed to plate more than three runs in 11 of its last 14 games.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.coms White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox information.

Could the Price be right for a big White Sox move?

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USA TODAY

Could the Price be right for a big White Sox move?

SAN DIEGO — The White Sox still need two pitchers, and the pool of free-agent options is shrinking.

Gerrit Cole and Stephen Strasburg, the two names at the tippy top of the starting-pitching market, might never have been true possibilities for the White Sox, but they sure won’t be now, each signed to a massive deal at this week’s Winter Meetings.

Zack Wheeler spurned the White Sox and their high bid to take less money and pitch for the Philadelphia Phillies. Jordan Lyles is now a Texas Ranger. Tanner Roark is now a Toronto Blue Jay. Josh Lindblom is now a Milwaukee Brewer. Michael Wacha is now a New York Met.

Yes, the options still out there remain attractive. Madison Bumgarner, Dallas Keuchel or Hyun-Jin Ryu would do the job of firing up the fan base and pairing with Lucas Giolito atop the South Side starting staff. But those are just three pitchers. And there are a lot of teams on the hunt for starting pitching.

Of course, it’s also not that simple. Hahn might have said this in talking about losing out on Wheeler: “You either get the guy or you don't. When you don't, you move on to the next one.” But it’s not as easy as just moving down to the next biggest name on the free-agent market.

“Any guy we target is because we feel strongly that they fit in for the long term, in terms of a big-ticket free-agent acquisition that we feel is going to help make us better throughout the good portion of this upcoming window,” the general manager said Wednesday. “There does come a point on any list, whether it's after the third guy or after the sixth guy or after the 10th guy, where you're no longer describing that type of player. So it's up to us to figure out how quickly we drift into that group.”

The price tags are getting high for these pitchers, and Hahn admitted that the prognosticators missed the mark a bit when it came to predicting the massive paydays Cole, Strasburg and Wheeler received. Those big deals could drive up the price on the Bumgarners and the Keuchels and the Ryus.

It’s not that the White Sox are incapable of spending in that area — they reportedly offered more than $120 million for Wheeler’s services — they just might not be as enamored with those options as folks on the outside might be.

Hahn is still committed to the idea that “the money will be spent,” though he’s not 100-percent committed to it all being spent in one place.

“I think it would be awfully foolish to say we're going to go out and spend whatever the amount of the offer (to Manny Machado) was immediately,” he said. “The point of that comment was there's other ways for us to allocate this money, and it's going to be allocated toward player acquisitions.

“You could argue some of it went to (Yasmani) Grandal, you could argue some of it went to the Eloy (Jimenez) extension or re-signing (Jose) Abreu or whatever we have coming down the pipe next.

“That offer was over an eight- to 10-year period, so to say it's all going out the door in Year 1 just because it's sitting there, maybe, but it's got to be for the right players.”

But does the right player exist anymore? Wheeler certainly seemed to be that for the White Sox, but he’s off the board and they still need two arms. It might be time to get creative.

What about David Price?

Hahn’s been throwing the spotlight on trades this week, talking at length Wednesday about an intriguing proposal the front office was considering, one that might not line up perfectly with the White Sox rebuilding plans.

ESPN’s Jeff Passan reported Tuesday that multiple teams have targeted Price, the Boston Red Sox playoff hero who is still owed a whopping $96 million over the next three seasons. The Red Sox, interested in ridding themselves of salary, could attach him to another player to incentivize a team to take that contract off their hands.

This is where the White Sox could come in. They have the financial flexibility to eat up Price’s remaining dollars. And they’d probably be pretty interested in acquiring one of Boston’s bats to stick in the middle of their lineup. The Red Sox have a lot of hitters who could be of use to the White Sox, but certainly Andrew Beninitendi comes to mind. He’s under club control for three more years, and while his addition would probably require a bit of realignment in the outfield, it’d be a good one to the South Side batting order.

The 34-year-old Price, meanwhile, wouldn’t exactly be, from a production standpoint, the high-quality add to the starting staff that other, still-available arms would be. He had a 4.28 ERA in 2019, the second highest of his career and his highest in a decade, even though he had positive stretches during the Red Sox otherwise miserable World Series hangover.

There are more concerning elements with Price, too. NBC Sports Boston’s John Tomase writing last week: “He's no longer a 200-inning pitcher. His elbow could blow. He considers himself a great teammate, but he consistently brings negativity into the clubhouse, which multiple rival executives have noted warily. He's too expensive. He hasn't made an All-Star team or earned a Cy Young vote since 2015. He's past his prime.”

Certainly none of that is terribly appealing.

But the White Sox need pitching. They need it. They can’t go into next season with what they’ve got or we’ll see the same parade of ineffective fill ins that we saw in 2019. Price might not be Cole. He might not be Wheeler. He definitely is preferable to Manny Banuelos and Odrisamer Despaigne.

And if he brings Benintendi with him? What if he brings J.D. Martinez with him? What if he brings Mookie Betts with him? Well, you can probably forget about Betts, the White Sox not at all interested in trading their top-flight prospects for one year of anyone, but the other two are worth thinking about.

There’s another element to all this: the return cost. When discussing that mysteriously appealing trade offer Wednesday, Hahn alluded to the popularity of the White Sox prospects. That comes as no surprise. What does is that the White Sox would consider trading any of them away. It’s near impossible to envision Luis Robert, Nick Madrigal or Michael Kopech going anywhere. But what about Andrew Vaughn? Or Dane Dunning?

It’s all speculative at the moment, of course. But the White Sox pitching need isn’t going to go away until they make some moves. Other teams are doing just that, making Hahn’s job harder by the minute.

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SportsTalk Live Podcast: Hawk Harrelson joins Hall of Fame

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USA TODAY

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Hawk Harrelson joins Hall of Fame

SportsTalk Live is on location at Day 3 of the MLB Winter Meetings.

0:00- Chuck Garfien, Vinnie Duber and Scott Merkin join David Kaplan to react to Hawk Harrelson making the Hall of Fame. Plus, they share their thoughts the Nomar Mazara trade and what may be next for the White Sox this winter.

10:00- Cubs general manager Jed Hoyer joins Kap and Tony Andracki to talk about the Cubs slow offseason and the importance of staying under the luxury tax. Hoyer also responds to Anthony Rizzo's agent's comment that the team will not be signing the first baseman to an extension this offseason.

19:00- Kap, Chuck, Vinnie and Tony discuss Gerrit Cole's record contract with the Yankees.

Listen to the full episode in the embedded player below:

Sports Talk Live Podcast

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