White Sox

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White Sox

NEW YORK — White Sox general manager Rick Hahn has no intention of second-guessing his manager, especially not in public.

As a three-week long tail spin continues to bring the White Sox closer toward .500, calls for Robin Ventura’s job have grown louder. The White Sox manager has received his fair share of criticism for game management during a stretch in which the club is 4-15. While Hahn said Tuesday he reviews the decision-making process with Ventura and his coaches in private, he doesn’t want to point fingers to avoid causing any unnecessary distractions.

“Part of the reason we are all drawn to this initially was as fans, and fans focus on the lack of results when things are struggling and look for areas to assign blame,” Hahn said. “For me, I don’t think it’s really in anyone’s best interest when things are going bad to publicly point fingers or second guess or assign blame like that on any individual.

“It’s more important to rally together as a group and focus on putting yourselves in the best position to win the next game ahead of you, which is all you can control at this point. That’s really from a public standpoint all that I think needs to be said. We are in a position right now where all we can control is winning tonight and we are doing everything in our power to put ourselves in the best position to do that.”

 

Once 23-10, the White Sox have run into an abundance of frustration the past few weeks. The team has gone from leading the American League Central by six games to dropping into third place and trailing the Kansas City Royals by two.

Ventura, who is in the final season of his current contract, has received heavy criticism toward the back end of what started Tuesday as a seven-game losing streak. Most recently, Ventura’s bullpen management in a series-opening loss Friday at Kansas City has been called into question as was his decision to bunt with his No. 3 hitter in Monday’s loss at the New York Mets.

“Look, the game management realm is 100 percent the manager’s purview, and I’m not going to stand here and second guess any decisions he’s making,” Hahn said. “Obviously we all have the benefit of hindsight right now in evaluating a decision. Our conversations in private are about the conversations that lead up to the decision or the thought process that leads up to the decision. And from my standpoint, it’s important to make sure that process is sound and that he and our coaches all have the right information when they’re making a strategic in-game decision, and I’m very pleased with where they are from an information standpoint and from a process standpoint. But it’s not my place, certainly publicly, to second guess in-game managerial decisions.”

As for his decisions, Hahn has done his best not to let emotion rule his. Constantly on the lookout for roster upgrades, including San Diego’s James Shields, Hahn said his team’s slide has made it trying at times to remain patient. But Hahn doesn’t want to make any kind of move — whether for a player or a personnel decision — with emotion involved.

“There is a strong temptation when you’re not in between the white lines or in the dugout to try to do something to have a greater impact between 7 and 10 each night,” Hahn said. “And there’s always that temptation to do something to improve your chances to win. But when things aren’t going well, that becomes perhaps a little bit greater, and that’s when you have to guard yourself against doing something strictly emotional or reactionary that’s going to cause perhaps more long-term damage than any short-term benefit from doing something. That applies to a trade or any sort of change to any process you’ve got going on and anyone in uniform. You don’t want to do something that may provide you with the short-term feeling like you’ve done something to have an impact when you’re going to wind up doing more harm than good by doing that move.”