White Sox

Sox Drawer: Conversation with the kid

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Sox Drawer: Conversation with the kid

Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2010
6:57 PM

By Chuck Garfien
CSNChicago.com

He stands 6-foot-5 and weighs one-hundred nothing. A man, who a very short time ago was just a kid, seemingly closer to Little League than the Major Leagues.

Just dont tell that to Shin-Soo Choo, Johnny Damon, Jim Thome, Joe Mauer, Victor Martinez, David Ortiz, and Nick Swisher who are a combined 0-for-10 against him.

His name is Chris Sale, who just three months after being drafted by the White Sox, has become quite the bargain.

Before taking on the Tigers Wednesday night, Chris and I chatted by phone about his improbable ascension through the minor leagues, his immediate impact with the White Sox, how he retired the best hitter in the game on three pitches, and then some.

Chuck Garfien: Hey Chris. So I was doing some research for this interview, and came across the year you were born, and immediately felt very old. For those reading this, what year were you born?

Chris Sale: 1989.

Garfien: Which is the year I graduated from high school.

Sale: Oh wow.

Garfien: Thanks. So, do you consider music from the 1980s to be oldies?

Sale: Well, I consider my parents to be old. They were into music from the 50s and 60s.

Garfien: But you see thats the problem. Im almost old enough to be one of your parents. Dont worry. Ill get over it. But can you clear up a rumor for me? Is it true that Scott Linebrink is your grandfather?

Sale: (Laughs) No. But we gave him a hard time the other day. We call him Papa Bear, because whenever we walk out to the bullpen before the game, he makes sure were all together and gets us all corralled so we go out there as a group.

Garfien: And he does kind of look like Papa Bear, too.

Sale: No comment on that.
Garfien: I want to go back to when you started playing baseball. When did you realize that you could throw the ball harder than everybody else your age?

Sale: Honestly, I didnt even start throwing too hard until I got to college. As a senior in high school I was throwing about 84-89. Every once in a while Id hit 90. But it wasnt until probably the fall of my sophomore year that I started throwing into the low 90s and every once in a while there would be a 94 or 95.

Garfien: So what happened? What changed for you that allowed you to throw harder than you had before?
Sale: Probably a combination of everything. Working out everyday, getting my arm stronger by throwing everyday, and eating better, getting some better food in my body.

Garfien: But looking at you, it appears that you dont eat anything!

Sale: Yeah, I get that a lot. Fans in the stands tell me that I need to eat more. Theyre already saying, Do they feed you in Chicago?

Garfien: Is it apart of your DNA to be really thin? I can relate to that. I was an anemic twig up until I was about 22 years old.

Sale: Oh yeah. My grandfathers nickname is Streamline because he was a swimmer and he looked like a long skinny line swimming in the water. People to this day still call him that. There are people who dont even know his real name. They just call him Streamline. My dad had a size 28 or 30 waist when he got married. Everyone in my family was really skinny when they were growing up, so Im not surprised.
Garfien: When the White Sox drafted you, how realistic was it that you could get to the majors this quickly?
Sale: I didnt really think about it too much. When I signed early on, they told me I would have the opportunity to move up quickly. I was looking forward to playing and getting in the innings, and to come back next spring with a chance to move up. I was pitching well, and then I got the call in August that I was coming up with the team, and it was unbelievable. A dream come true. Imagine sitting back six or seven months ago, and suddenly being in this position. Its the greatest thing thats happened to me as far as baseball.
Garfien: So you pitch 10 innings in the minor leagues, you come up here, you obviously have confidence in your ability, but was there a part of you that was saying, Okay, can I really do this so quickly in my career?

Sale: Oh yeah. I certainly didnt start acting like I was calm, cool, and collected about it. I was excited, but at the same time I was really nervous. I was facing college hitters, then I was facing minor league guys, and now Im pitching against guys who I watched on TV growing up, and played on their teams in video games just because they hit the ball so far. I was definitely a little nervous coming up, but things have worked out well, and Im getting more comfortable on the mound everytime.

Garfien: Ozzie Guillen says that what he likes about you is that you have guts. Have you been like that with everything in life, or does it just manifest itself when youre on the pitching mound?

Sale: When I take the mound, I just like to be intense. I was just talking about it with Linebrink yesterday, to just go out there and be focused on what Im doing and not taking off a pitch. Every pitch being 100 percent confident, and be locked in for every single pitch.

Garfien: A couple weeks ago against the Twins, you struck out Joe Mauer on three straight sliders. What was your mind-set there? Take me back to that moment. What was going on in your head, facing Mauer, one of the best hitters in the game, and youre saying, Im going to get him out with three straight sliders."

Sale: A.J. Pierzynski was the one calling the pitches. Obviously I had never faced Mauer. I just didnt want him to get a chance to open up the game, so we were just being careful with him. It ended up being a good situation for us. After I threw the first one, I just wanted to get it in there for a strike. The second one, I wanted to make him chase it a little bit. And the third one, A.J. called for a third slider in a row, and I was like, Alright, whatever. Here it goes. And I just wanted to throw it towards the strike zone and let it break down, and it ended up working out well.

Garfien: Youre a major league pitcher now, but youre also a human being. When you walked off the mound after doing that, was there a part of you that said, Did I just do that?
Sale: Oh yeah. Theres a part of me still saying that.

Garfien: Your first major league win came on Monday against the Tigers. You threw 2 23 scoreless, hitless innings in relief. What was that feeling like for you, and was there a beer shower involved?

Sale: Yes, there was definitely a beer shower. It was awesome being able to go out there and get that first win. Its unbelievable.
Garfien: Are you liking being a reliever? Or is starting pitching you really want to do?

Sale: It really doesnt matter to me. I just want to have the opportunity to pitch. Whatever they want to do. If they end up changing their mind and say, We want to keep you in the pen, Ill be fine with that. If they tell me in the spring that they want me to come back and be a starter, thats fine too. Whatever they think. Thats what Im going to do.

Garfien: And finally, is there a funny story or moment thats happened in your major league career thats going to stay with you for a very long time. It could be on the field, off the field, that you feel like sharing.
Sale: This whole experience! Are you kidding me? Its been surreal. Obviously, being drafted in the first round. It was unbelievable. Signing early, and playing, and being in a pennant race at 21-years-old, and moving through the system so quick, I couldnt have asked for anything better. I still come to the park everyday and its just like, Wow, this is awesome. This is what Ive worked for my whole life, to get this opportunity, and Im just trying to make the best of it.
Garfien: Well, you certainly have. Good luck tonight.
Sale: Thanks.

Reported promotion of Zack Collins adds another piece to White Sox rebuilding puzzle

Reported promotion of Zack Collins adds another piece to White Sox rebuilding puzzle

The White Sox rebuilding puzzle is getting closer to completion.

Zack Collins is reportedly en route to the major leagues, according to a report from Miami talk-show host Andy Slater. That adds another one of the White Sox highly rated prospects to the growing list of them at the big league level as the franchise’s contention window looks set to open relatively soon.


Collins was the team’s first-round draft pick in 2016, selected with the No. 10 pick that year out of the University of Miami. Currently ranked as the No. 11 prospect in the farm system, he’s always been praised for his offensive abilities. Last season at Double-A Birmingham, he finished the year with a .382 on-base percentage and launched 15 homers, also winning the Home Run Derby at the Southern League All-Star Game.

In 48 games with Triple-A Charlotte this season, Collins owns a .258/.382/.497 slash line with nine homers, nine doubles, 38 RBIs and 35 walks.

Collins has been lauded as a big bat, but there have been questions about other parts of his game as he’s risen through the system. From the day he was drafted, there were questions about his defensive ability, leading to speculation that he might one day end up at a position besides catcher. He’s also racked up the strikeouts in the minors, with 396 of them in 322 games over his four minor league seasons.

But the White Sox haven’t wavered in their confidence that Collins can be a big league catcher, and it looks like that’s the position he’ll fill should the White Sox call him up before the start of next week’s Crosstown series with the Cubs. Welington Castillo was removed from Sunday’s loss to the New York Yankees with back tightness. The team said Castillo will be reevaluated on Monday. With this report of Collins’ promotion, it looks like Castillo could be headed to the injured list.

Another top prospect reaching the majors adds another tangible example of rebuilding progress. Fans have been clamoring for the promotions of Dylan Cease and Luis Robert all season long, and while Collins might be a little further down in the rankings than those two, this should still please fans who, even in a season filled with positives, want to see a more rapid advancement toward the rebuild’s ultimate goal.

Collins will perhaps benefit from a lack of pressure, what with James McCann in the midst of a potentially All-Star season as the White Sox primary catcher. The White Sox could perhaps continue to lean on McCann, allowing Collins to ease into the major leagues.

But just like Michael Kopech last August and Eloy Jimenez in March, Collins’ mere arrival is a step forward in this process, one that should please fans immensely.

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Yoan Moncada continues battle with back issues

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USA TODAY

Yoan Moncada continues battle with back issues

Yoan Moncada's battle with his back issues might not be as over as we thought.

The third baseman made his return to the White Sox starting lineup Sunday following a four-game layoff due to a mild back strain. But his return didn't last long. After a fourth-inning strikeout in his second plate appearance of the 10-3 loss to the visiting New York Yankees, Moncada was removed from the game with what the team announced as upper back tightness.

Moncada is described as day to day. The White Sox have an off day Monday ahead of the start of a two-game Crosstown series at Wrigley Field on Tuesday night.

"He's doing good. I think I'm not the only one who noticed his grimace in the swing. It made no sense to continue to expose him to that," manager Rick Renteria said after Sunday's game. "All indications are he should be ready to go on Tuesday.

"Didn't seem to put him in any predicament. Hopefully it didn't set him back. All indications are that hopefully he'll be back on Tuesday."

Moncada was removed from Monday's game against the Washington Nationals with what was initially described as back spasms. Renteria updated the verbiage to a back strain in the following days. Moncada missed Tuesday's game against the Nationals, went through a Wednesday off day and then missed the first three games of the four-game weekend set with the Yankees. His return lasted all of four innings Sunday before he was taken out again.

"Just watching the swing, watching the finish, which is what I was concerned with, getting through the ball. He's ready to get through the ball, it's just the finish. He's feeling a little something there," Renteria said. "You can't replicate it in any drill work. We've tried to do it. Everything he did was good. All the work he did was good.

"Everything we tried to do to replicate it, it wasn't existent until you get into the game, then you know. That's why I think it was a good — I don't know if you want to call it a test, but it was a test. We wanted to see where he was at. Didn't make any sense to continue to push him. Get him ready and calm it down and get him ready for the series against the North Siders."

Moncada wasn't the only White Sox hitter removed from Sunday's game. Welington Castillo, who was the designated hitter, was taken out with what the team announced as lower back tightness. Renteria confirmed after the game that Castillo's injury came on his swing in the second inning, a line drive off the center-field wall that ended up as only a single. Castillo will be reevaluated during the off day Monday.

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