White Sox

Sox Drawer: The Curious Case of Omar Vizquel

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Sox Drawer: The Curious Case of Omar Vizquel

Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2011
Posted 7:44 p.m.

By Chuck Garfien
CSNChicago.com

GLENDALE, Ariz - In life, there is something called an aging process. Its a pretty simple concept that is shared by every single human being walking the planet.

Well, except for one person: Omar Vizquel.

The 43-year-old infielder, who turns 44 in April, is here at Camelback Ranch not just defying the odds, but quite possibly modern science as we know it.

Im getting older and older, and I question myself, 'How long is it going to be and when will it be the time? Vizquel said in front of his locker, a wide, childish smile beeming from his face. So far so good.

Vizquel has come so far, and been so good for 22 seasons, putting together a Hall of Fame worthy career that seems to have no end.

Some might say he drinks from the Fountain of Youth - I disagree. Upon closer examination, Im pretty sure he bathes in it.

You just have to admire how hes gone about it for all these years, said White Sox general manager Kenny Williams, whose first order of business during the off-season was signing Vizquel to a second one-year contract. Hell, I played against him. I havent played in 17 years!

How long has Vizquel been in the majors? Heres an indication:

The year he entered the big leagues with the Seattle Mariners in 1989, George Bush succeeded Ronald Reagan as President, the Berlin Wall came tumbling down and Gordon Beckham turned three years old.

You talk about a guy who loves the game, Beckham said. Him being around just makes people better because of what he brings to the game, the energy he brings to the game. I mean hes 43, about to turn 44, and hes got more energy than anybody in here.

I like to have fun with Vizquels knack of staying so young, often comparing him to the main character in the movie "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button," about a man who magically aged backwards.

So I posed this question to Omar: Is everyone around you getting older, and youre somehow getting younger?

Inside Im not getting older. Inside, Im still the same kid that likes to dive for balls and play with dirt and be fooling around with the kids. Obviously biology tells me something different. Its like your conscience is telling you that you cant do the things you were doing 10 years ago.

But last year seemed to tell him otherwise. He batted .276 in 108 games, collecting the most runs, hits, doubles, RBIs and stolen bases since 2007. Plus, the 11-time Gold Glove winner made only three errors in the field while playing second base, third base and shortstop.

Omar takes great care of himself, and hes kind of an artist out there, Williams said. Hes the piano player whos never going to lose the touch of the keys.

Well put.

My hands are the one thing that has kept me in the game for a long time, Vizquel explained. As long as my legs are able to reach and jump and do the crazy stuff that the infielders do, I have a chance to make the team.

Something tells me he will.

But how much longer can he keep playing? When I asked him if he can go another three or four years, he joked, I dont even know about next week! At this point, hes taking it year-by-year, and is not looking too far ahead.

However, there is a certain milestone that is stored in the back of his mind and is possibly within reach. Vizquel is closing in on 3,000 career hits, a monumental number for a major league player, often a necessary key in gaining entrance to the Hall of Fame.

Youre about 200 hits away, right? a reporter asked.

201, Vizquel quickly answered with a laugh.

Will he get there?

Knowing Omar, it's only a matter of time.

Chuck Garfien hosts White Sox Pregame and Postgame Live on Comcast SportsNet with former Sox sluggers Frank Thomas and Bill Melton. Follow Chuck @ChuckGarfien on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox news and views.

In order to be contenders, the White Sox must learn how to win in 2020

In order to be contenders, the White Sox must learn how to win in 2020

GLENDALE, Ariz. — If the White Sox are going to start winning in 2020, they're going to have to learn how.

Certainly a talented roster will play a large role in that. But the influx of veterans this winter didn't just bring on-field capabilities. In adding Yasmani Grandal, Dallas Keuchel, Edwin Encarnacion, Gio Gonzalez and Steve Cishek, Rick Hahn's front office injected this team with winners, guys who have been to the playoffs and made sizable impacts on winning clubs.

If anybody can teach the young White Sox how to win, it's these guys.

"Yasmani's been in the postseason each of the last five years, Keuchel four of the last five years and Edwin each of the last five years," Rick Hahn said after the Encarnacion signing became official in early January. "That's obviously a tremendous track record for each of them but also speaks in part to what we're trying to accomplish not just on the field but in terms of taking that next step in our clubhouse and this young core not only growing together but learning how to win and learning what it takes to be successful not only over the course of the summer but well into October, as well."

And that playoff experience is rather extensive:

— Grandal won four consecutive NL West championships with the Dodgers and went to back-to-back World Series in 2017 and 2018 before helping the Brewers reach — and hitting a home run in — the NL wild card game last season.

— Keuchel reached three out of four postseasons with the Astros, including in his Cy Young season of 2015 and the team's now-controversial World Series season of 2017, and won an NL East title with the Braves in 2019.

— Encarnacion played in three of the last five AL Championship Series and won AL Central crowns with the Indians in 2017 and 2018.

— Gonzalez played in four postseasons with the Nationals and made the NLCS with the Brewers in 2018.

— Cishek pitched with the Cubs team that played in the NL wild card game in 2018.

Considering even the White Sox team leader, Jose Abreu, has never finished a major league season above .500, all this new playoff experience adds something that was sorely missing.

"You've got to have the talent, and we have the talent on this team," Encarnacion said. "This team makes me remember the team that we had in 2015 with the Blue Jays. A lot of young talents, a few veteran guys and we put everything together and this team is going to be right.

"The team has to be together. If you're going to win, we've got to be together like a team. Pick up your teammates. That's why you have to stay together. If your teammate does something wrong, you're going to feel it and you're going to want to do something to help them out. That's all about it.

"This team makes me remember what we had in Toronto. ... This team has the talent to compete in the division and win."

That 2015 Blue Jays team won the AL East and made it to Game 6 of the ALCS before being eliminated by the eventual world-champion Kansas City Royals. Encarnacion hit 39 homers and drove in 111 runs that season, a set of numbers that would be good news for the White Sox half a decade later.

But in addition to that production, the White Sox could reap the benefits of Encarnacion's playoff experience. The same goes for what they can glean from Grandal, Keuchel and Gonzalez.

"I think that these guys in particular have played a huge role in postseason play in terms of actually performing and being in the limelight. I think their presence in and of itself and probably some of the conversations that they suddenly have with the group play a big part," manager Rick Renteria said Tuesday at Camelback Ranch. "I think that's one of the things that we're hoping to take advantage of. For us, it's a really important time, because now we're trying to take those young men that have developed and are putting themselves on the map, as very good Major League Baseball players trying to take it to the next place.

"And it's like anything too, those moments you can't replicate until you get there. So everybody deals with them differently. Hopefully we're able to deal with them positively. And they have some guys in that I've gone through it that will help them be able to make some adjustments."

The winning-experience ingredient has been added to the interesting gumbo that is the 2020 White Sox, a team that has designs on bringing October baseball to the South Side for the first time in more than a decade. All these veterans can serve as resources for the young guys and teach them what is necessary to be a contender along the way.

And these veterans can feed off the talent of those same youngsters to drive toward another addition to their postseason resumes.

"Once you get a little taste of the playoffs, that's why you play is to get that feeling," Keuchel said. "As much as you want to replicate it in the regular season, for guys who have no playoff experience, I think the regular season is that feeling. But there's another feeling to it that pushes you and wants you to be a better player.

"Ultimately I told Rick Hahn this: I said, 'Four out of the last five years, I've made the playoffs, and I don't expect any of these three years (during the contract with the White Sox) to be any different.'" 

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the White Sox easily on your device.

Tim Anderson starts YouTube channel to fix baseball's 'kind of bad' marketing'

Tim Anderson starts YouTube channel to fix baseball's 'kind of bad' marketing'

Tim Anderson asserted himself as one of the flashiest young players in baseball last season. Now, he’s taking his personality to YouTube.

The White Sox shortstop posted the first video to his channel on Saturday and has posted two more since. In the first, he explained why he started the channel.

“The reason we’re starting it is because, you know man, the marketing game is kind of bad in baseball, so who’s going to create that lane? I’m going to create that lane and give people behind the scenes,” Anderson said. “Everybody knows that the next five to six years are going to be dope, going to be great. Everybody is talking about the South Side. We got the pieces. Everybody’s excited. It’s going to be fun.”

Bold, as always, from Anderson. He didn’t hold back about baseball's “kind of bad” marketing of the game and its players. He’s not the first to complain about it, but he was blunt.

“I’m to the point now in life, I’m trying to capture everything,” Anderson said. “I don’t want to miss nothing. That way when I do turn 70 or 80 all I gotta do is be like ‘pop that in, let me see what I was doing in my 20s, in my 30s, in my 40s.’ It’s about capturing every moment in my life.”

So far, all we’ve seen are spring training workout videos but Anderson says he will talk about big moments in games during the season.

“I’m just going to be as real as I can be, and I feel like YouTube is the best way to go about it and connect with my fans,” Anderson said. “We’re going to give you those conversations before games when we ride to the field or we’re going to give you those conversations that we’re talking about the game that happened before, like what you did. We’re going to give you those conversations on how you feel in those moments when you do those things on the field, whether it’s bat flip or pimp a home run. We’re going to give you that. We’re going to give you everything.”

The next time Anderson makes a big play or is involved in a controversial moment, he might be airing out his thoughts for the world to see on his YouTube channel. This could get interesting.

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the White Sox easily on your device.