White Sox

Sox Drawer: Look out for the Indians

448736.jpg

Sox Drawer: Look out for the Indians

Monday, April 18, 2011
Posted: 3:16 p.m.

By Chuck Garfien
CSNChicago.com

We interrupt the White Sox recent slide, and current panic on the South Side, to examine a rare phenomenon taking place in the Central Division.

It involves the Cleveland Indians and Kansas City Royals, two teams normally buried in the basement of the division along with dust, termites, mothballs, and Perry Como records, that have suddenly sprung into orbit in April, breathing the fresh spring air at the mountain top, looking down on everyone else, sitting in first and second place.

Considering the elevation, weve been waiting for both teams to suffer from altitude sickness. Three weeks into the season, were still waiting.

And in the case of Cleveland, Im afraid its not going to happen. Yes, I said it:

The Cleveland Indians are for real.

READ: Ozzie no bull on the 'pen

I realize this is the same team the White Sox outscored 14-0 in the first four innings of the season, but look where both teams have gone since.

Sunday, the Tribe, who finished 69-93 last year, beat the Baltimore Orioles to run their record to 11-4. Its their best start since 2002. A win Monday, and itll tie the 1999 squad that began 12-4 and won 97 games.

Cleveland is playing well, Ozzie Guillen observed Sunday. I said that in Cleveland when we left. People laughed at mewhen I say something, people think it's a bunch of crap.

This isnt.

So how and why are the Indians winning?

I can talk about their pitching staff, the youngest in baseball, that is heeding the advice of pitching coach Tim Belcher, by throwing lots and lots of strikes.

Is it that easy?

I can talk about their lights-out bullpen, the comebacks of Travis Hafner and Grady Sizemore (who homered and doubled in his first game on Sunday), the defense of new third baseman and Joe Crede look-a-like Jack Hannahan, and the emergence of shortstop Asdrubal Cabrera.

But the real reason for the Indians sudden rise can be traced to another Cabrera, a single player who has the personality of a porcupine, and once upon a time called Chicago home for one brief, but memorable season.

Ladies and Gentlemen, let me re-introduce you to Orlando Cabrera.

Say what you will about the former White Sox shortstop, but if there is one thing that Cabrera has proven he can do, and quite possibly better than anyone in the game right now, it is this:

He can win.

Everywhere and anywhere.

FOLLOW: Chuck Garfien on Twitter

Its a remarkable run that cannot be overlooked.

Lets start with the classic case of 2004. Cabrera gets traded from the Montreal Expos to the Boston Red Sox on July 31. The Red Sox were 56-46 and 8.5 games out of first place. Cabrera arrives, he hits a home run in his very first at-bat, the Red Sox go 42-19, finish the regular season 98-64, and snatch the AL Wildcard.

We all know what happens next. The Red Sox win the World Series, Bostons first in 86 years. History is made.

At the time, it probably seemed like an isolated incident. But the Curious Case of Orlando Cabrera was just beginning.

The next season Cabrera signs as a free agent with the Angels. They win 95 games plus the AL West, but lose to the White Sox in the ALCS.

I guess you cant mess with destiny.

WATCH: Dunn says he just 'stinks' right now

The Angels average 92 wins in the three years that Cabrera plays there. Theyre competitive every year. Orlando wouldnt have it any other way.

In 2008, Cabrera is traded to the White Sox, who just finished that utterly forgettable season of 2007, when they went 72-90. That White Sox team was just too nice. Had no edge. They needed some fire.

Bring in Cabrera.

He gives the Sox a dependable leadoff hitter, rock solid defense, and a flood of competitive juices that had dried up since the World Series of 2005.

On the field, the Sox win 89 games and the AL Central. But in the clubhouse, Cabrera doesnt win many (or any) friends. He openly criticizes his teammates, calling some of them clowns. On at least two occasions he calls the press box to dispute an error. He rankles everyone along the way, including Ozzie Guillen.

Heres an interview I did with Cabrera in Tampa that season, while Orlando was in the middle of one of his controversies, complaining that Guillen and his teammates didnt have his back.

Long story short, Cabrera was not brought back. But you cant deny the results: the White Sox won with him, and didnt the season after he left.

So in 2009, Orlando signs with the As. Its the one blemish in Cabreras career. The As are a mess. They arent going anywhere. Even O.C. cant save them. But he would soon overcome it. At the trade deadline, Oakland trades him to Minnesota.

Guess what happens next?

READ: Former White Sox third baseman Joe Crede on Ozzie, Morel

After being mired in mediocrity at 52-51, the Twins find their mojo. They go 35-25 the rest of the way, winning the division, beating the Tigers by a game.

What and who was the difference? Cabrera.

But just like the Red Sox, Angels, and White Sox, the Twins choose not to bring him back when his contract ran out. Cabrera would go through the entire winter unsigned. His reputation as a malcontent overshadowing what he and everyone is here to do: to win.

Finally, in February of 2010, just two weeks before spring training is set to begin, he signs with the Cincinnati Reds, a team without a winning record in a decade.

Hes a leader and a winner, said Reds GM Walt Jocketty at the Cabrera press conference. To me that says it all.

And true to form, what do the Reds do in 2010? They win.

They finish 91-71, capturing the NL Central, making their first trip to the post-season in 15 seasons. Cabrera doesnt know of such droughts. It was his 4th straight trip to the playoffs with his 4th different team. No small feat.

After the season, do the Reds decide to bring him back? Of course not. Cincinnati declines his 4 million option, choosing to go with the younger and cheaper Paul Janish instead.

So once again, Cabrera sits through another winter unsigned. Nobody wants him.

Finally on February 10, just nine days before theyre set to report for spring training, the Indians belly up to the bar and sign Cabrera to a one-year, 1 million contract with incentives, and they dont even guarantee him a starting position. Cabrera has to compete for the Indians second base job, a position he had played only 30 times in his major league career, compared with 1,791 games at shortstop.

No matter. Cabrera wins the job. No surprise.

The Indians lose the first two games of the season to the White Sox. They look completely overmatched. They seem destined to be destitute once again. But in the third game, with the Sox leading 1-0 in the 6th, Cabrera drills a two-run homer off John Danks, giving the Indians their first lead of the season.

The Tribe dugout explodes. Everyones jacked. They add two more runs in the 7th, three more in the 8th, they end up blowing out the Sox 7-1, and proceed to win seven more games in a row after that, including a sweep of the Red Sox.

The Orlando Cabrera factor strikes again.

He wont bat .300. He wont hit 20 home runs. Hell probably piss off half, if not all of his teammates along the way, but he will get the most out of himself and his team. And they will win. Its what he does.

I think we have what it takes, Cabrera said on Sunday.

To do what?

To win, he said. I dont like to compete. I like to win.

And so far, no team has won more games in the American League than the Indians.

Are they going to win 90 games and the division? I wont go that far. But theyre going to be there all season, being a pain in the rear for everyone, thanks to their maniacal leader.

Charlie Sheen says he knows all about winning. Forget about it. Hes a fraud. You want a winner? Its Orlando Cabrera. The Indians have him. By the end of the year, youre going to be sick of him. Maybe the Indians too.

But I promise you this: Theyll win. I guarantee it.

Chuck Garfien hosts White Sox Pregame and Postgame Live on Comcast SportsNet with former Sox Bill Melton. Follow Chuck @ChuckGarfien on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox news and views.

The White Sox sent down Carson Fulmer, so why isn't Lucas Giolito receiving the same treatment?

The White Sox sent down Carson Fulmer, so why isn't Lucas Giolito receiving the same treatment?

Lucas Giolito is having a rough go of things in his second year with the White Sox.

He came into the season with some pretty high expectations after posting a 2.38 ERA in seven starts at the end of the 2017 campaign and then dominating during spring training. But he’s done anything but dominate since this season started, and after one of his worst outings in Thursday’s 9-3 loss to the Baltimore Orioles, he’s got a 7.53 ERA in 10 starts in 2018.

Giolito stuck around for only four outs Thursday, but he allowed the Orioles to do plenty of damage, giving up seven runs on six hits — two of which were back-to-back home runs to start the second inning — and three walks. He leads the American League with his 37 walks.

“I take what I do very seriously. I work as hard as I can at it,” Giolito said. “So when I experience failure like this, it’s kind of hard to deal with. All I can do is come back tomorrow, keep working on things and hopefully have a better one.”

All of Giolito’s struggles have fans wondering why the White Sox haven’t sent him down to Triple-A to work on his craft.

“I don’t foresee that at this particular time,” Rick Renteria said when asked if Giolito could be sent to Triple-A. “I think he’s just a young man who’s got to continue to minimize the emotional aspect of crossing from preparation into the game and staying focused, relaxed and hammer the zone with strikes. And truthfully it’s just first-pitch strike and get after the next one.”

The White Sox have already sent one young pitcher down in Carson Fulmer, who was having a nightmarish time at the big league level. Fulmer’s results were worse than Giolito’s on a regular basis. He got sent down after posting an 8.07 ERA in nine outings.

But hasn’t Giolito suffered through command issues enough to warrant some time away from the major league limelight? According to his manager, Giolito’s situation is vastly different than Fulmer’s.

“I don’t see them anywhere near each other,” Renteria said. “They’re two different competitors in terms of the outcomes that they’ve had. Lucas has at least had situations in which he might have struggled early and been able to gain some confidence through the middle rounds of his start and continue to propel himself to finish some ballgames, give us six or seven innings at times. So it’s two different guys.

“With Gio, I expect that we would have a nice clean start from the beginning, but when he doesn’t I still feel like if he gets through it he’ll settle down and continue to hammer away at what he needs to do in order to get deeper into a ballgame, and that was a little different with Carson. With Carson it was right from the get-go he was struggling, and he had a difficult time extending his outings after the third or fourth because it just kept getting too deep into his pitch count and not really hammering the strike zone as much.”

Renteria is not wrong. Giolito has had a knack to take a rough beginning to a start and turn it into five or six innings. Notably, he gave up a couple first-inning runs and walked seven hitters and still got the win against the Cubs a week and a half ago. And while his first-inning ERA is 10.80 and his second-inning ERA is 12.54, he’s pitched into at least the sixth inning in seven of his 10 starts.

Renteria’s point is that Giolito is learning how to shake off early damage and achieving the goal, most times out, of eating up innings and keeping his team in the game. Those are a couple valuable qualities to develop for a young pitcher. But are those the lone qualities that determine that Giolito is suited to continue his learning process at the major league level? His command remains a glaring problem, and both he and Renteria admitted that his problems are more mental than physical.

“The one thing everyone has to understand is we have to go beyond the physical and attack a little bit more of the mental and emotional and try to connect and slow that down,” Renteria said. “Those aspects are the ones that ultimately, at times, deal in the derailment of the physical action. So if we can kind of calm that down a little bit.

“He’s very focused. Giolito is high intensity. Nice kid but high-intensity young man when he gets on the mound. You might not believe it. He’s going 100 mph. So I think it goes to more just trusting himself, trusting the process, taking it truthfully one pitch at a time.”

Well, if a demotion to the minors isn’t likely, what about moving Giolito to the bullpen? Carlos Rodon and Chris Sale dipped their toes in bullpen waters before moving to the rotation. Could a reversal of that strategy help Giolito?

Well, the current state of the White Sox starting rotation — Fulmer in the minors, Miguel Gonzalez on the 60-day DL and pitchers like James Shields, Hector Santiago and Dylan Covey, who aren’t exactly long-term pieces, getting a lot of starts — doesn’t really allow for another piece to be removed.

“I know they have done it with Rodon and Sale,” Renteria said. “The difference is we don’t have the makeup of the starting rotation that those clubs had in order to put those guys in the ‘pen. We are in a different situation right now. Moving forward, is that something we can possibly do? Absolutely. It has been done with very good success.

“Right now we are in truly discovery mode and adjustment mode and adapting and trying to do everything we can to get these guys to develop their skill sets to be very usable and effective at the major league level and we are doing it to the best of our ability.”

There could be promise in the fact that Giolito has turned a season around as recently as last year. Before he was impressing on the South Side in August and September, he was struggling at Triple-A Charlotte. Even after he ironed things out, things had gotten off to a rocky enough start that he owned a 4.48 ERA and 10 losses when he was called up to the bigs.

It doesn’t seem Giolito will be going back to Charlotte, unless things continue to go in a dramatically poor direction. Right now, these are just more of the growing pains during this rebuilding process. “The hardest part of the rebuild” doesn’t just means wins and losses. It means watching some players struggle through speed bumps as they continue to develop into what the White Sox hope they’ll be when this team is ready to compete.

Danny Farquhar to throw out the first pitch before White Sox game on June 1

0421-danny-farquhar.jpg
AP

Danny Farquhar to throw out the first pitch before White Sox game on June 1

In another example of how amazing Danny Farquhar’s recovery has been, the pitcher will throw out the ceremonial first pitch before the White Sox game on June 1.

Farquhar suffered a brain hemorrhage from a ruptured aneurysm during the sixth inning of the team’s April 20 game against the Houston Astros. But his recovery has been astounding, and he was discharged from the hospital on May 7. Farquhar’s neurosurgeon expects him to be able to pitch again in future seasons.

Farquhar has been back to visit his teammates at Guaranteed Rate Field a couple times since leaving the hospital. June 1 will mark his return to a big league mound, even if it’s only for a ceremonial first pitch with his wife and three children. Doctors, nurses and staff from RUSH University Medical Center will be on hand for Farquhar’s pitch on June 1.

The White Sox announced that in celebration of Farquhar’s recovery, they will donate proceeds from all fundraising efforts on June 1 to the Joe Niekro Foundation, an organization committed to supporting patients and families, research, treatment and awareness of brain aneurysms.