White Sox

Sox Drawer: Manny Time

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Sox Drawer: Manny Time

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010
Updated 4:40 PM

By Chuck Garfien
CSNChicago.com

When I asked White Sox general manager Kenny Williams on Friday if he was any closer to acquiring a certain dreadlocked slugger, he coyly replied, its going to be an interesting weekend. Get ready, because this White Sox season, already loaded with interest and intrigue, has the potential to explode through your television set.

Manny Ramirez is coming to the South Side.

The White Sox and Dodgers finalized the deal on Monday, with the Sox picking up Ramirez and the 3.8 million remaining on his contract.

Once the trade was made, Williams spoke by phone with Ramirez, who will make his White Sox debut Tuesday night in Cleveland on Comcast SportsNet at 6pm.

Hes excited, Williams said. Hes a funny guy too, and really wanted to get going and show that hes still one of the premier hitters around. What better way to do it than to come to a club thats competing for a championship and help us along the way.

Yes, Williams doesnt have his sights set on just winning the AL Central. Hes thinking bigger, and believes that once you get into the post-season, having a special bat like Mannys is critical for success.

We not only want to get into the playoffs, but once we get into the playoffs, we want the chance to do something special, and there are some teams that have some good pitching, and you need a hitter that can not only hit good pitching, but can hit good pitching in the clutch, and this guy has been there and done that in the past.

Want proof? Check out Ramirez career numbers against some of the American Leagues top pitchers, some of whom the White Sox might face in the days and weeks ahead:

John Lackey: .429 5 HR 12 RBI

CC Sabathia: .583 4 HR 8 RBIs

Cliff Lee: .429 2 HR 6 RBIs
Andy Pettitte: .405 5 HR 20 RBIs
Dan Haren: .514 3 HR 6 RBIs
Matt Garza: .455
A.J. Burnett: .500

The White Sox are known for their firework shows. With Manny, they get a player who comes to town with his own pyrotechnics. Williams is hoping that a change of scenery will suddenly light Mannys fuse, and add some spark in the process.

Whats wrong with a little flare, whats wrong with a little character and have a little fun in the process, Williams said. As long as he plays hard and goes about his business as a pro, there will be no issues here. Weve got a lot of personalities around here if you havent noticed.

Williams certainly noticed what Ramirez can do late in the season in the right situation. Just see the Dodgers in 2008.

Los Angeles acquired Ramirez from the Red Sox, and he produced two of the greatest months of offense in Dodgers history, hitting .396 with 17 homers and 53 RBIs in August and September, almost single-handedly guiding Los Angeles into the playoffs, and past the Cubs in the first round.

But that was 36-year-old, pre 50-game drug suspension Manny. Now at 38, we are left to wonder how much he has left in the tank.

For the season, Ramirez is hitting .311 with eight home runs and 40 RBIs in 66 games. Not jaw-dropping numbers, but keep in mind, they occurred from April through June. The Sox got Ramirez for September and October, otherwise known as Manny Time.

One of the most clutch hitters over the last 20 years, Ramirez is legendary for seizing the moment. Hes hit 93 career home runs in September and October. With the bases loaded, hes a career .332 hitter (with 21 homers and 252 RBIs). With runners in scoring position, hes batting .328. With 2 outs, its .311.

Hes hit 55 home runs in the eighth inning, 31 homers in the ninth.

And against the Minnesota Twins?

Hes a lifetime .331 hitter with 39 doubles, 29 homers, and 114 RBIs. Dont think the White Sox havent checked.

When Ramirez became a target for the White Sox last month, Williams said he didnt need to do much to convince Jerry Reinsdorf. The Chairman, who is a savvy baseball man, was in from the beginning.

A lot of people dont know this, but (Reinsdorf) is ultra competitive, so my selling job didnt have to be me pounding the table, Williams said. He wants to win just as much as I do. Hes not adverse to taking a shot, taking a chance.

When I asked CSN analyst Bill Melton on Sunday what made Frank Thomas such a special hitter, he said When you were leaving the ballpark whether the White Sox were winning or losing, he was the type of hitter where fans would actually stop in the middle of the aisles and say, Lets watch Frank hit one more time.

Ramirez is the same way.

Youll love him. Youll hate him. But one thing is for sure, youll watch him. You cant help it.

Thats Manny.

And now, hes headed to the White Sox. Right in the heat of a pennant race and in the middle of a KennyOzzie love triangle.

One thing is for sure: fireworks are coming, either on the field or off it.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Hope in a bad time with Laurence Holmes, Tim Anderson

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: Hope in a bad time with Laurence Holmes, Tim Anderson

As the country faces tough times not only with the pandemic but the many demonstrations of protest against police brutality, it's time we had a real discussion on the issues.

Chuck Garfien is joined by Laurence Holmes to discuss the murder of George Floyd, and the reactions. Later on, Tim Anderson joins to discuss what he's doing to get involved to help create change.

(5:44) - Getting justice for George Floyd

(14:06) - How to get police reform

(22:00) - How to be a good ally

(29:25) - Laurence getting emotional on the radio

(41:10) - Tim Anderson on the protest in Chicago

(49:10) - Trying to remain positive during this time

Listen here or below.

White Sox Talk Podcast

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Tim Anderson won't stick to sports: 'This problem is bigger than baseball'

Tim Anderson won't stick to sports: 'This problem is bigger than baseball'

Tim Anderson is a baseball player. It’s how he makes a living for him and his family.

In this moment in history, he affirmed that indeed he is finding it difficult to try to care about baseball.

“I guess you could just say take care of what really matters,” he said during a conference call Monday afternoon. “I think this problem is bigger than baseball at the moment.”

Anderson, the reigning big league batting champ and the only Black American player on the White Sox roster, sees what’s happening across the country, watching the thousands of protesters demanding an end to police brutality against and the police killings of Black people in the wake of the death of George Floyd last week in Minneapolis.

“Definitely witnessing something I only have heard about but I never have lived in,” he said. “It was definitely crazy. Just to see the things that are going on and how the world is reacting, I think there are a lot of angry people out there who feel like they are going unheard.

“I think that’s why it’s boiling down the way it is and things are happening the way they are. There’s a lot of angry people out there.”

It’s impossible to think about athletes and the issue of police brutality against Black people and not think of Colin Kaepernick, the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback who took a stand by taking a knee during the national anthem at NFL games. He enraged plenty in the process and has remained jobless despite being a Super Bowl quarterback in a league constantly searching for answers at the position.

RELATED: White Sox's Tim Anderson: 'You have to show the good, the bad and the ugly'

Anderson hasn’t gone that far. He said he hasn’t participated in any of the protests. His public response to the current climate can be summed up in a few tweets, the most striking of which featured four pictures of him posing in front of the aftermath of Saturday night’s protests and separate acts of destruction and vandalism in Chicago. Monday, he described “the good, the bad and the ugly” of that aftermath as a piece of history, as well as art.


But as he’s made clear before, he’s not going to “stick to sports,” the instruction often lobbed at athletes who dare speak about anything but their chosen profession. Fans are always hungry for a baseball player’s comments on baseball. A certain subset of them has zero tolerance for their comments on just about anything else.

It’s a ridiculous way to act, as if all people should reserve their thoughts to their job and nothing more. And in these times with sports on hold due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Anderson perfectly explained why.

“We stand for more than just sports,” he said. “If you remove the sports, as you can see now, then what are we? We're human beings. We stand for more than our job title.

“People are trying to be themselves instead of just being ‘the baseball player.’ … I think it's just allowing more people to be themselves.”

Who knows how prevalent the tough conversations that lead to change are in clubhouses across Major League Baseball. Some players have spoken out on Twitter, including White Sox pitcher Lucas Giolito. Asked about his conversations on these subjects with his teammates, Anderson singled out Giolito as someone he’s talked to before and someone who “gets it.”

“Gio is the person … we kind of conversate on a different level when it comes to certain things,” Anderson said. “You hear his perspective, and always using that as a learning tool. … He’s understanding it and kind of speaking out because we have talked about things, what it’s like growing up being black and how things are just not always what they are now.

“Definitely bold of him to speak out. Let me know he felt the love. I always knew how Gio felt about things and certain situations because that is a person I talk to. Just to see that, I definitely felt the love. He gets it and he understands it. So, I think that’s why he posted it. He wants what’s best, as well. I think we all do.”

Anderson isn’t even participating in the protests, and it's unfair to ask him to speak for Black America just because he’s the Black guy on his major league team.

But he’s an American citizen like the rest of us, and he’s choosing not to stick to sports and to act in a way he hopes can help solve what’s plaguing our country.

“We're at a moment where we need everybody's love, regardless of what race,” he said. “I think we're at a moment where we need to hold hands, every race, every color, it don't matter. I think we move better as one.”

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