White Sox

Sox Drawer: The Truth About J.J. Putz

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Sox Drawer: The Truth About J.J. Putz

Friday, Jan. 22, 2010
8:21 PM

Im sitting in a hotel room at the Palmer House, the site of Sox Fest 2010. 139 years ago, this was the site of the very first Palmer House (known as The Palmer), which only 13 days after being built, was destroyed in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.

Into the room walks J.J. Putz. He might not know much about Chicago history, or the fire that once erupted here, but if given the choice, the new White Sox reliever would torch his 2009 season straight to the ground.

It was a mess from the beginning, said Putz in an interview with Comcast SportsNet. He was traded from the Mariners to the Mets in a monster three-team, 11-player deal in December 2008. The former closer was supposed to be the 8th inning set-up man for Francisco Rodriguez, a 1-2 punch that on paper was also supposed to make the Mets unbeatable in the late-innings.

But soon after he arrived in New York, Putz knew that something was wrong.

When the trade went down last year, I never really had a physical with the Mets, said Putz. I had the bone spur (in the right elbow). It was discovered the previous year in Seattle, and it never got checked out by any other doctors until I got to spring training, and the spring training physical is kind of a formality. It was bugging me all through April, and in May I got an injection. It just got to the point where I couldnt pitch. I couldnt throw strikes, my velocity was way down.

And it was showing on the mound. The once super human reliever had suddenly become a broken down mess. After 29 games, he was 1-and-4 with a 5.22 ERA. He had 19 walks in 19 innings. And this was New York. The boos cascading from Citi Field could be heard across the river in Jersey.

Being hurt is never fun, especially when you go to a team like New York, where the expectation level is so high, and youre not able to do what you know you can do. (The Mets) gave up a lot to get me, so it was disappointing and frustrating.

Especially when the Mets told Putz not to talk about being hurt with the media.

I knew that I wasnt right. I wasnt healthy. The toughest part was having to face the media and tell them that you feel fine, even though you know theres something wrong and they dont want you telling them that youre banged up.

By June, Putz was concerned that the pain in his elbow would start affecting his shoulder, so he had surgery to remove the bone spur, and was supposed to miss 10-to-12 weeks. However, when he tried to come back in August, he felt some tightness in his right forearm.

Thats when (the Mets) told me that I blew my elbow out. That was kind of a shock because I never felt any pain in it.

It didnt matter. The Mets shut him down. Putzs season was over. And he learned a very important lesson.

That its my career, and when you know something doesnt feel right, and they want to take these little sidesteps to do something, and just wait and wait and wait, you got to get it taken care of instead of trying to prolong the inevitable.

In November, the Mets chose to wipe the slate clean, declining J.J.s 9.1 million option for 2010.

Putz says that the first team to call was the White Sox.

They wanted to do a physical right away, said Putz. They took an MRI. The elbow looked clean.

Which was exactly what Sox GM Kenny Williams wanted to see.

When our doctors finally got their hands on him, he passed his physical with flying colors, said Williams after the signing. We couldn't be happier with what was communicated to us by our doctors.

The Sox quickly signed Putz to a one-year, 3 million contract.

One person who couldnt be happier was Matt Thornton. The fellow reliever and Michigan native placed a call to Putz to gauge his interest, but Putz says that Matt didnt put on the kind of hard sell that has been reported. The two are close friends and huge fans of the Wolverines. But Putz is quick to point out that only one of them has maze and blue in his blood.

I went there. He went to some Grand Valley State University Technical Ranch Dressing School or something like that. Hes a poser.

Friday at Sox Fest Putz said that his arm feels great, and he will be throwing off a mound in two weeks.

But when he walks to the mound at U.S. Cellular Field when the season begins, hes going to need a new song announcing his arrival. Putz has always used Thunderstruck by ACDC, but that's been the White Sox team song since their 2005 World series title.

So, clearly Putz needs a new song and hes asking you for suggestions. That's right...you!

Email me your ideas (SoxDrawer@comcastsportsnet.com) and Ill be sure to pass them along to J.J. If he chooses your song, you'll get White Sox tickets for this season!

And no offense to Gordon Beckham, but no more songs by the Outfield.

White Sox free-agent focus: Marwin Gonzalez

White Sox free-agent focus: Marwin Gonzalez

This week, we’re profiling some of the biggest names on the free-agent market and taking a look at what kind of fits they are for the White Sox.

The best way to plan for a future full of unknowns is to cover all your bases — and all the spots in your outfield, too.

Marwin Gonzalez is going to be a very popular man on the free-agent market this offseason because he is one of the most demonstrably versatile players in the game. He’s been a do-it-all savior for the Houston Astros in recent seasons, part of their rise from baseball’s cellar to a world championship in 2017 and their current status as one of the best teams out there.

During the 2018 season alone, Gonzalez appeared at every position except pitcher and catcher, playing 73 games in left field, 39 at shortstop, 32 at second base, 24 at first base, three at third base, two in center field, one at designated hitter and one in right field. That versatility is practically unmatched throughout the game, and it’s likely to get the soon-to-be-30-year-old Gonzalez a nice contract this winter.

For a rebuilding team like the White Sox, he’d be a perfect fit, chiefly because there’s still so much to play out in this rebuilding process and it’s difficult to figure out where the future holes will be. In Gonzalez, the White Sox could add someone now who could fill any number of those potential weak spots, be they caused by failed development or injuries down the road.

But what about his offense? If there is a reason to stay away from Gonzalez, it’s the significant dropoff in his offensive numbers last season. In 2017, the season he helped the Astros win their first-ever World Series title, he slashed .303/.377/.530 with 23 home runs and 90 RBIs, finishing in the top 20 in AL MVP voting. In 2018, he slashed .247/.324/.409 with 16 home runs and 68 RBIs — and that’s with more playing time, his games played jumping from 134 to 145 and his plate appearances jumping from 515 to 552.

Is that enough to scare teams away? That remains to be seen.

Would Gonzalez be a good fit for the White Sox? It sure seems that way, though there are perhaps 29 other teams that could say the same thing.

Jose Abreu is an All-Star starter and Silver Slugger, but will he be with the White Sox past 2019?

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USA TODAY

Jose Abreu is an All-Star starter and Silver Slugger, but will he be with the White Sox past 2019?

It was Jose Abreu's worst season in the major leagues. And he still started the All-Star Game and won a Silver Slugger.

The White Sox have a decision to make at some point, though not necessarily this offseason, on what to do with Abreu in the long term. His on-field production isn't a question. His role as an off-field mentor isn't a question. But when Opening Day 2020 rolls around, he'll be 33 years old. Does that "align" — to borrow a word used very often by Rick Hahn at last week's GM Meetings — with the White Sox long-term plans?

Abreu's entering the final season of his current contract coming off a year defined as much by freak injuries and a prolonged slump as by the accolades he received in spite of those things. For the first time as a big leaguer, he finished a season without hitting at least 25 homers and racking up at least 100 RBIs. Only playing in 128 games, he posted career lows in most stat categories, with his 36 doubles, the second most in his career, a notable exception. His .473 slugging percentage was only the second lowest of his five-year major league career.

But if the awards were any indication — though it should be added there was a dearth of productive first basemen in the American League last season — he still has the ability to be one of the game's best at his position. His 162-game average over the course of the past five seasons: a .295/.353/.516 slash line with 32 home runs and 107 RBIs. Three times in five seasons, Abreu has received MVP votes, finishing as high as fourth during his Rookie of the Year season in 2014.

And on top of all those numbers, Abreu has earned consistent praise for his role off the field. He's been an omnipresent mentor to Yoan Moncada, who's not even two years removed from being the No. 1 prospect in baseball, with the two Cubans' lockers right next to each other in the White Sox clubhouse. And Abreu is touted as an example to all the team's young players, who can look to him as a model for how to go about one's business and prepare on a daily basis.

So the value is obvious. But in order to make a decision on Abreu, the White Sox have to figure out when their planned contention window is going to open. Significant injuries to a host of their highly touted prospects — most notably the elbow injury that forced Michael Kopech into Tommy John surgery — has muddied the waters when it comes to predicting when this wave of minor league talent will was ashore on the South Side.

If that year is soon, if it's still 2020, then having a 33-year-old Abreu in the middle of the order doesn't seem like a bad thing at all. But in order to make that happen, the White Sox will need to give him a contract extension at some point before this time next year, or they'll have to give him a new contract if he were to reach the free-agent market. If the year when the contention window opens is much past 2020, how old is too old to help the White Sox make a championship run? When does the dropoff in production that comes with most aging players arrive?

The White Sox talk highly of Abreu, giving no indication they plan to move on from the guy they spent lavishly on after the 2013 season. And for his part, Abreu continues to talk glowingly about the White Sox and remains committed to saying that he hopes to be in Chicago for the foreseeable future.

"Everybody knows that 2019 is going to be the last season of my current contract, but I try not to think about that because I am part of the White Sox and I believe that I’m going to be part of this organization for a very long time," he said through a translator during a Tuesday conference call with reporters. "That’s something that’s out of my hands right now because I have one season left on this current contract.

"But in case the next season is my last one, I’d like to thank all the White Sox organization and all the people who have been around me during my time on this team, especially the owner, Jerry (Reinsdorf). He has been an outstanding person to me. He’s one of the greatest people that I’ve met in this country.

"But I try not to think about that because I truly believe that I’m going to be part of this organization for a very long time. But we’ll see. I know that this is a business, and that’s the way you have to approach it."

That answer to a reporter's question covered all the bases, a masterclass in the public-relations friendly response. But Abreu does always come off as someone who wants to stick with this team. He knows what's going on in the minor league system and he knows how bright the White Sox future is.

And the White Sox know what Abreu can do. Their reported desire to trade Avisail Garcia might be an indication they're ready to move on from their older players, but Garcia and Abreu are vastly different cases, with Abreu far more productive on the field and more commonly discussed as an asset to the young players off it.

During the 2017 season, the decision on Abreu seemed an easy one for the White Sox: Keep this extraordinarily productive player and team leader around as long as you can. But injuries might have made that decision more difficult — and not the freak ones Abreu suffered during the season, but the ones suffered by prospects that might have changed the timeline of this whole thing, and therefore the "alignment" of Abreu and this team's bright future.