White Sox

Viciedo not worried about replacing Quentin

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Viciedo not worried about replacing Quentin

Over his four seasons with the White Sox, Carlos Quentin averaged 27 home runs and 80 RBIs a season with an .857 OPS. That's a good level of production, but it's one Dayan Viciedo isn't concerned about replacing.

"As far as pressure to try to do what Carlos has done, I don't feel any pressure because for the most part I'm just going to go out there and just do what I've been training to do," Viciedo said through translator Jackson Miranda. "So I feel very comfortable and I think this is going to be great year for me."

If Viciedo is true to his word and doesn't try to match Quentin's level of production, that's a good thing. A pair of projections have Viciedo hitting 21 home runs with 67-75 RBIs and an OPS between .759 and .779, numbers Quentin eclipsed in every season but his injury-riddled 2009.

But that's one area that Viciedo perhaps can eclipse Quentin: playing time. Quentin never played more than 131 games in a season while in Chicago and only averaged 495 plate appearances per season. Over the last three seasons, Viciedo has averaged 542 plate appearances per season between Birmingham, Charlotte and Chicago.

A healthy Viciedo will have every opportunity to improve on his power numbers, too. For all his power potential, he's averaged just 19 home runs over the last three years. But that's something Viciedo isn't concerned about, either.

"I'm going to focus on making contact, getting some RBIs and getting people in. That's the most important thing to me," Viciedo said. "I have the strength to hit home runs, so I'm confident the home runs will come."

Viciedo also said he's not bitter about not being called up earlier in 2011 when the White Sox offense was scuffling and he was clobbering Triple-A pitching.

"I feel that, wherever they put me, that's where I'm supposed to be, I'm just going to do the best that I can at those positions," Viciedo said. "I feel that at that previous year, it just wasn't my time, but this is my year and I'm just going to do the best and take advantage of it."

White Sox Talk Podcast: Could the White Sox season start in Arizona without fans?

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: Could the White Sox season start in Arizona without fans?

When the MLB season will start is still up in the air, but could they play without fans?

Chuck Garfien is joined by Ryan McGuffey and Chris Kamka to discuss what that would look like, and take voicemails from fans on if they would like a baseball season with no fans at the stadiums.

(1:50) - How much things have changed since Feb. 3

(10:44) - What does baseball with no fans look like?

(16:15) - The summer heat in Arizona might be a problem

(20:12) - Fans just want baseball, and if that means no fans, then so be it

(26:40) - Is it even safe for players to be next to each other?

(30:50) - If baseball does start, that means the world would be in a better place

Listen here or below.

White Sox Talk Podcast

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Scott Podsednik's base stealing set Paul Konerko up for home runs

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USA Today

Scott Podsednik's base stealing set Paul Konerko up for home runs

The White Sox knew the first month of their 2005 schedule would be crucial because 22 of their first 28 games were against American League Central opponents.

But no one could have predicted that they’d obliterate their division en route to an unlikely 21-7 start.

After a three-game sweep of the Kansas City Royals in early May, the White Sox improved to 18-4 against their own division, an incredible pace that put them 4.5 games up on the Minnesota Twins, who weren’t exactly playing poorly.

But after a heavy divisional start, the schedule was about to flip wildly. Now the White Sox had to prove they could beat the rest of the American League. The next 25 games on the schedule were against non-A.L. Central opponents. In fact, other than a three-game series against the Indians in early June, 37 of their next 40 games were against non-divisional opponents.

No sweat.

Starting off in Toronto from May 6-8, the White Sox kept rolling. With Jose Contreras and Orlando Hernandez starting to pitch deeper into the games, manager Ozzie Guillen was able to keep red-hot Jon Garland in his comfortable spot deeper in the rotation. The White Sox won the first two games in Toronto, and while they may have had a reputation for winning one-run ballgames, the ’05 team was also capable of beating you by lighting up the scoreboard.

That’s what happened on Saturday, May 7, as Garland failed to get out of the sixth inning for the first time all season. It didn’t really matter because he had been spotted a 10-2 lead as the White Sox pounded Blue Jays starter Ted Lilly for six runs in just 1.2 innings. The home run list was long and included Tadahito Iguchi, Aaron Rowand, Juan Uribe and two from Paul Konerko, who hadn’t gone deep since Apr. 19.

But it was Scott Podsednik who stole the show, as he swiped four bases in the 10-7 win, tying a White Sox single-game record.

“He’s a true leadoff guy,” Paul Konerko told the Chicago Tribune. “There aren’t many guys in the game who get on base and can change the pace of what’s going on out there. Pitchers are throwing over to first because he’s stealing bases. Pitchers are making bad pitches because they’re worried about him.”

Both of Konerko’s home runs that day came after Podsednik successfully stole both second and third base.

This was just the latest fun way in which the White Sox beat a team that season -- and they were already 23-7 on the year.

The next day on the calendar was Sunday, May 8 and Mark Buehrle was on the mound so you knew there was a good chance the White Sox could get to St. Petersburg, Fla. in time for a late dinner.

Buehrle entered that start with a 34-game streak of pitching at least six innings and the White Sox were looking for their second eight-game winning streak of the season.

Again, it was May 8.

Here’s what Guillen’s lineup looked like:

LF Scott Podsednik
SS Juan Uribe
DH Carl Everett
1B Paul Konerko
CF Aaron Rowand
RF Jermaine Dye
C A.J. Pierzynski
3B Joe Crede
2B Pedro Lopez

Anyone remember Pedro Lopez?

The White Sox-Blue Jays game from May 8, 2005 will air Monday at 4 p.m. CT on NBC Sports Chicago. For the full White Sox Rewind schedule from the 2005 season, click here.