White Sox

White Sox BBQ: Peering into the 2011 crystal ball

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White Sox BBQ: Peering into the 2011 crystal ball

Thursday, Dec. 9, 2010
9:05 AM

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

With rumors, whispers, and "team sources" ever swirling through the offseason, turn to the BBQ to provide a bit of a reality check. With the addition of Adam Dunn and after getting A.J. Pierzynski and Paul Konerko back in the fold, what's ahead for Chicago White Sox general manager Ken Williams? Williams interrupted his victory lap after his bounteous week long enough to peer into 2011's crystal ball. Let's look with him:

So, Williams said the White Sox budget is tapped out. So, no Carl Crawford or Adrian Beltre?

Owner Jerry Reinsdorf's heart just skipped a beat. No, there is no room for a big-ticket item any longer. Williams consistently went to the c-word on Wednesday: 'creative.' That's Chisox code for, it's time to trade, not sign.

Isn't the roster pretty well complete anyway?

For all practical purposes, it is. The team as it stands heads onto the field in 2011 with the same lineup as a year ago: Pierzynski-Konerko-Gordon Beckham-Alexei Ramirez-Brent Morel-Juan Pierre-Alex Rios-Carlos Quentin, with new addition Dunn at DH. Pencil in reserves Brent Lillibridge (middle infieldoutfield), Ramon Castro (catcher), Mark Teahen (corner infieldcorner outfield), and Omar Vizquel (2B3BSS), with one more Charlotte Knights addition to fill out the player roster. The healthy rotation will be Mark Buehrle-Jake Peavy-John Danks-Gavin Floyd-Edwin Jackson and the short men in the pen are Matt Thornton-Chris Sale-Sergio Santos-Tony Pena. That leaves an opening for a long reliever (say, Lucas Harrell), a righty short man (say, Gregory Infante), and a lefthander to be named later.

So, yeah, there's not a lot to have to add. Might Williams create some budgetary wiggle room by flipping a Teahen or, pending Peavy's prognosis heading toward spring, Jackson, for a less expensive major-leaguer? You bet. But overall, he can shop at the dollar store for a reliable lefty short man (Thornton mentor Arthur Rhodes, anyone?) and field a team within his overall budget.

We've heard for years that, even as payroll increases, the White Sox are generally a hand-to-mouth organization. What got into the Chairman that made him bloat the budget by 15 million?

As Williams said on Wednesday: "Jerry Reinsdorf is a very competitive man and wants to win a championship, and it's our job to put together as good of a club as we can to accomplish those goals."

Reinsdorf is also fiercely loyal, leading to rumors (officially denied) that he applied some pressure late Tuesday to secure Konerko's return. Kong himself said, "I respect the man, and he's treated me nothing but good the whole way through. Jerry is a very loyal guy, and honestly over the years there would be 20 guys he would keep if it all worked out right. I know it kills him when he has to let someone go that he likes."
Any truth to the notion that the 2011 White Sox could have been a new version of The Kids Can Play?

Not really. As much as Williams may have thrown his conviction between his unrealized second plan for the team (going young), it would have been hard to shift in that direction completely given the hefty contracts held by players like Peavy and Buehrle.

Is Bobby Jenks gone for good?

No, but the window is cracked only a sliver. Jenks would have to return on a team-friendly deal, something in the ballpark of Pierzynski's two years, 8 million. Had Pierzynski not re-upped, perhaps that budget slot could have been applied to a Jenks return. As it stands, the Pale Hose would do better with a lefty arm more in the range of 1-2 million.

That's fine, but who's gonna close?

"We start at a great place because we have two of the best left-handers in the game, we think Sale and Thornton," Williams said. "We have one of the more emerging guys in Sergio Santos, and you saw that last year."

Expect White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen to choose from among those three - or perhaps some combination of the trio - to close games out. Williams on Wednesday speculated that either Thornton or Sale would finish games, and specifically noted that the White Sox were not in the market for a closer.

What's the haps with Peavy?

Unconfirmed reports have Peavy ahead of schedule in his rehabilitation from his muscle tear, but the White Sox will be cautious regarding his return - especially because it was Peavy's own push to continue pitching through discomfort at midseason that may have triggered the tear.

Williams dismissed the idea of holding a stopwatch to his righty fireballer: "I don't put on timetables. You know what happens when you put timetables on? You media get around the guy and every day it's, 'how are you doing? or aren't you coming back on this day or this week?' It puts pressure on the guy and he's not allowed to go out there when he's actually ready."

So if Peavy's not ready and Sale is committed to the bullpen, who's the fifth starter?

Early-season off-days make a fifth man somewhat inessential, but there's always the option of inserting Pena or a Charlotte starter (Harrell) as needs be. As much as rumors have floated around about peeling off one of his elite five horses, Williams is in every way depending - as he hoped to last year - on the starters pitching deep into games and alleviating pressure on the bullpen, not the other way around. Or, put another way, says Williams: "I don't want to get into subtracting from the major league roster if I can help it."
Are there any positional battles left?

Well, if one exists, it's at the hot corner, where the Chisox's oddballs and ephemera collect. Morel is clearly the incumbent third baseman in spite of just a three-week audition last September. Both Williams and Guillen have raved about Morel's defense, which was standout in the minors. At the plate, Morel's numbers were less than tasty, but the rookie battled through a number of at-bats, which the brain trust found promising.

Additional options abound should Morel regress. Teahen was acquired a year ago and inserted at third, with an extension to boot, and he promptly spit the bit with the starting assignment, fumbling in the field before a misplayed grounder turned into a fractured finger that knocked him out for a couple of months. Vizquel stepped in ably to substitute for Teahen, but as Guillen said at the Winter Meetings on Monday, if Vizquel is a regular in 2011, "we're in trouble." (That's not a dis on Vizquel as much as commentary that Plan A will have again collapsed). Finally, with Konerko back and Dunn in to sub at first, Dayan Viciedo will lose his first-base reps with the big club and will move back across the infield to compete for playing time.

The Minnesota Twins were awfully quiet at the meetings. Have the White Sox closed the gap?

To be fair, the Twins had quite a lead on the White Sox coming in, and will have two of their three best players, Justin Morneau and Joe Nathan, presumably back at full health for 2011. This question merits a much longer answer in a future piece, Dunn could well match or surpass the best output of Morneau (or, in his stead, more kill-with-kindness heroics from Jim Thome). Minnesota could also well lose their No. 2 starter (Carl Pavano) and two bullpen mainstays (Jesse Crain and Matt Guerrier) in free agency.

The White Sox have closed the gap. Have they sewn up the hole completely? Not without further defections from the Twin Cities. And not before the team culture supports the notion that it's not only OK to punch Minny back in the mouth, but sometimes even throw the first roundhouse.
So after Pierzynski and Dunn deferred money in their contracts in order to pull Konerko back to the White Sox, what's Paulie going to say when he sees the two at SoxFest?

How about: Boys, I'm buying.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.com's White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute White Sox information.

Reynaldo Lopez is changing his place in the White Sox rebuild: 'When I'm on the mound, I'm the best and I don't care about the rest'

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USA TODAY

Reynaldo Lopez is changing his place in the White Sox rebuild: 'When I'm on the mound, I'm the best and I don't care about the rest'

Rebuilds are full of surprises.

Fans can pencil in any names they want into their 2020 lineups, but there’s almost no one who’s going to have a 100-percent success rate when it comes to predicting exactly what the next contending White Sox team will look like.

Reynaldo Lopez carried plenty of hype when he was acquired from the Washington Nationals in the Adam Eaton deal prior following the 2016 season. He had a high prospect ranking before he was called up last summer. He hasn’t materialized out of nowhere.

But with names like Lucas Giolito, Michael Kopech, Alec Hansen, Carlos Rodon and others to compete with for one of those coveted rotation spots of the future, was anyone going to use the term “ace” to describe Lopez?

Well, in this rebuilding season’s most pleasant surprise for the White Sox and their fans, that’s exactly what Lopez has been. He’s been hands down the team’s best starting pitcher, and he’s making the case that he shouldn’t be considered an ancillary piece in this rebuilding process but a featured one.

He might not be getting the attention that others are. But he’s doing the most with his opportunity of being at the big league level right now. In the end, as long as you’re getting batters out, who cares how much attention you get?

“It’s not about what people say or what they are talking about,” Lopez said through a translator. “It’s about the confidence I have in myself, and I have plenty of confidence in myself. For me, I’m the best. I’m not saying the other guys are not. I’m just saying that’s the confidence I have. When I’m on the mound, I’m the best and I don’t care about the rest.”

Sunday marked the best start of Lopez’s young career, so said the pitcher himself. He was terrific in shutting down the visiting Texas Rangers, holding them to just two hits over eight scoreless innings.

It was one heck of a bounce-back performance considering what happened last time out, when he was roughed up for six runs in just two innings against the Pittsburgh Pirates.

The difference? His attitude, his focus, his intensity, his conviction.

“I just changed my attitude in the game,” Lopez said. “I was more positive today than I was in my last outing and that was one of my biggest differences.”

“I do think he came out a little bit more focused, to be honest,” manager Rick Renteria said. “The intensity level was a little higher today. I think he threw the first couple pitches 97, 98 miles an hour, where his last outing they were at 93, 94. There wasn’t a whole lot of commitment or conviction to his pitches (against the Pirates). I think, as we talked after the last outing, (pitching coach Don Cooper) spoke to him a little about making sure he brought that intensity that he has the ability to do, to bring it from Pitch 1 and he did today.”

Renteria liked it all, and he saw something different in his pitcher when he went out to talk to him with two outs in the eighth. Lopez issued a two-out walk, and Renteria considered lifting Lopez from the game.

Lopez made sure his manager wouldn’t pull the plug on this outing.

“I hid the baseball in my glove because I didn’t want to leave the game,” Lopez said. “I asked me, ‘How are you? Are you good?’ And I told him, ‘Yes, I’m good.’ Then he asked me again, ‘Do you think you are able to get him out?’ And I said yes, ‘This is my game, and I’m going to finish it.’”

What did Lopez do with his extra life? He finished it all right, blowing Shin-Soo Choo away with a 96-mile-an-hour fastball. Then he showed as much emotion as he’s ever shown on a major league field. He earned that celebration.

“When you see your manager come out and you’ve already gone through most of your game in terms of what you might think you have in number of pitches available to you, and you reiterate that you want to finish a particular batter because you want to get out of that inning, and you do it, it's an accomplishment,” Renteria said. “It's a big accomplishment. For him, pretty good hitter. He battled him and he was able to get out of that inning and complete a very, very strong eight-inning outing.”

It’s the kind of exclamation point on a dominant afternoon that could stir some big plans in White Sox fans always dreaming of the future. What Lopez has done this season has been a strong case for a spot in that future rotation and a spot at the front of it, at that. Following Sunday’s gem, Lopez owns a 2.98 ERA with at least six strikeouts in four of his nine starts.

There’s a lot of development and a lot of time left before the White Sox contention window opens. But Lopez pitching like this offers a glimpse into the crystal ball, a look at what could be for an organization that’s acquired so much talent over the last two years.

You might not have seen it coming like this, but the future arriving in the form of Lopez is a sign that brighter days are ahead on the South Side.

Carlos Rodon's first rehab start went well, White Sox set date for next one

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USA TODAY

Carlos Rodon's first rehab start went well, White Sox set date for next one

Carlos Rodon's return to the South Side is coming soon.

The top-five draft pick recovering from last fall's shoulder surgery made his first rehab start Saturday with Class A Kannapolis and threw well. Rodon allowed just one run on three hits in his five innings of work, striking out six and walking none.

The White Sox announced Sunday that Rodon's second rehab start will come Thursday with Triple-A Charlotte.

As for the exact date Rodon returns to the big league roster, it's unknown at this point. General manager Rick Hahn said that Rodon will make multiple rehab starts. One might look to the pitcher's recovery from a spring injury last year as a guide. Rodon made four rehab starts in June before debuting with the White Sox on June 28.

This recovery is different, of course. Rodon is eligible to come off the 60-day disabled list on May 28.