White Sox

White Sox David Robertson's foundation helps Illinois tornado victims

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White Sox David Robertson's foundation helps Illinois tornado victims

CLEVELAND - The much-needed relief David Robertson has delivered this week hasn’t been restricted to the mound.

A day after he recorded his second save of the season, the White Sox closer said Wednesday morning that his foundation, High Socks For Hope, is on the ground in the communities surrounding Rockford, Ill., that were ravaged by last week’s tornadoes. Robertson said representatives of the foundation, which he and his wife, Erin, began in 2011, have served more than 200 hot meals to members of those communities.

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After joining the White Sox this offseason, the Tuscaloosa, Ala. native hopes to establish ties in Chicago and provide further assistance to those areas in the near future.

“I’ve seen what (tornadoes) can do,” Robertson said. “It’s amazing how much damage a tornado can create, especially when they got big like that (Alabama). It seemed like Illinois got hit pretty hard. We’ll continue to try to help out any way possible.

“We’re going to continue to try and raise money and figure out how best to help the community.”

The Robertsons started their foundation in 2011 after Tuscaloosa and Birmingham, Ala. were hard hit by an F-4 tornado that left 64 dead. Since 2011, Robertson has pledged $100 for every strikeout and $200 for each save, raising more than $13,000 to date, including $1,200 this season.

Robertson hopes to engage the local community and find corporate sponsorship for his non-profit once his family is settled in Chicago. In the past, Robertson has been able to help residents of Staten Island, N.Y., who were affected by Superstorm Sandy, as well as tornado victims in Norman, Okla. and in Texas.

One save away from 50 in his career, Robertson said he hopes to further help those affected in Rochelle, Ill. and Fairdale, Ill. after things have settled down and the debris has been cleared. Robertson said one area in particular his foundation has helped is furnishing homes and apartments, in particular providing mattresses.

“When you lose everything, going to get a new mattress can cost you, there’s no telling,” Robertson said.

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Though he didn’t know anyone killed in Tuscaloosa, Robertson felt the impact. People’s houses, restaurants he’d dined at, were flattened by the storm. Robertson’s work in Alabama continued this offseason as the foundation helped to furnish 50 newly built apartments for local veterans.

“Lot of places I grew up going over to are just gone,” Robertson said. “We’ve got to get back on the fundraising trail again. If we can get that going again we can really help some families.”

In order to be contenders, the White Sox must learn how to win in 2020

In order to be contenders, the White Sox must learn how to win in 2020

GLENDALE, Ariz. — If the White Sox are going to start winning in 2020, they're going to have to learn how.

Certainly a talented roster will play a large role in that. But the influx of veterans this winter didn't just bring on-field capabilities. In adding Yasmani Grandal, Dallas Keuchel, Edwin Encarnacion, Gio Gonzalez and Steve Cishek, Rick Hahn's front office injected this team with winners, guys who have been to the playoffs and made sizable impacts on winning clubs.

If anybody can teach the young White Sox how to win, it's these guys.

"Yasmani's been in the postseason each of the last five years, Keuchel four of the last five years and Edwin each of the last five years," Rick Hahn said after the Encarnacion signing became official in early January. "That's obviously a tremendous track record for each of them but also speaks in part to what we're trying to accomplish not just on the field but in terms of taking that next step in our clubhouse and this young core not only growing together but learning how to win and learning what it takes to be successful not only over the course of the summer but well into October, as well."

And that playoff experience is rather extensive:

— Grandal won four consecutive NL West championships with the Dodgers and went to back-to-back World Series in 2017 and 2018 before helping the Brewers reach — and hitting a home run in — the NL wild card game last season.

— Keuchel reached three out of four postseasons with the Astros, including in his Cy Young season of 2015 and the team's now-controversial World Series season of 2017, and won an NL East title with the Braves in 2019.

— Encarnacion played in three of the last five AL Championship Series and won AL Central crowns with the Indians in 2017 and 2018.

— Gonzalez played in four postseasons with the Nationals and made the NLCS with the Brewers in 2018.

— Cishek pitched with the Cubs team that played in the NL wild card game in 2018.

Considering even the White Sox team leader, Jose Abreu, has never finished a major league season above .500, all this new playoff experience adds something that was sorely missing.

"You've got to have the talent, and we have the talent on this team," Encarnacion said. "This team makes me remember the team that we had in 2015 with the Blue Jays. A lot of young talents, a few veteran guys and we put everything together and this team is going to be right.

"The team has to be together. If you're going to win, we've got to be together like a team. Pick up your teammates. That's why you have to stay together. If your teammate does something wrong, you're going to feel it and you're going to want to do something to help them out. That's all about it.

"This team makes me remember what we had in Toronto. ... This team has the talent to compete in the division and win."

That 2015 Blue Jays team won the AL East and made it to Game 6 of the ALCS before being eliminated by the eventual world-champion Kansas City Royals. Encarnacion hit 39 homers and drove in 111 runs that season, a set of numbers that would be good news for the White Sox half a decade later.

But in addition to that production, the White Sox could reap the benefits of Encarnacion's playoff experience. The same goes for what they can glean from Grandal, Keuchel and Gonzalez.

"I think that these guys in particular have played a huge role in postseason play in terms of actually performing and being in the limelight. I think their presence in and of itself and probably some of the conversations that they suddenly have with the group play a big part," manager Rick Renteria said Tuesday at Camelback Ranch. "I think that's one of the things that we're hoping to take advantage of. For us, it's a really important time, because now we're trying to take those young men that have developed and are putting themselves on the map, as very good Major League Baseball players trying to take it to the next place.

"And it's like anything too, those moments you can't replicate until you get there. So everybody deals with them differently. Hopefully we're able to deal with them positively. And they have some guys in that I've gone through it that will help them be able to make some adjustments."

The winning-experience ingredient has been added to the interesting gumbo that is the 2020 White Sox, a team that has designs on bringing October baseball to the South Side for the first time in more than a decade. All these veterans can serve as resources for the young guys and teach them what is necessary to be a contender along the way.

And these veterans can feed off the talent of those same youngsters to drive toward another addition to their postseason resumes.

"Once you get a little taste of the playoffs, that's why you play is to get that feeling," Keuchel said. "As much as you want to replicate it in the regular season, for guys who have no playoff experience, I think the regular season is that feeling. But there's another feeling to it that pushes you and wants you to be a better player.

"Ultimately I told Rick Hahn this: I said, 'Four out of the last five years, I've made the playoffs, and I don't expect any of these three years (during the contract with the White Sox) to be any different.'" 

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Tim Anderson starts YouTube channel to fix baseball's 'kind of bad' marketing'

Tim Anderson starts YouTube channel to fix baseball's 'kind of bad' marketing'

Tim Anderson asserted himself as one of the flashiest young players in baseball last season. Now, he’s taking his personality to YouTube.

The White Sox shortstop posted the first video to his channel on Saturday and has posted two more since. In the first, he explained why he started the channel.

“The reason we’re starting it is because, you know man, the marketing game is kind of bad in baseball, so who’s going to create that lane? I’m going to create that lane and give people behind the scenes,” Anderson said. “Everybody knows that the next five to six years are going to be dope, going to be great. Everybody is talking about the South Side. We got the pieces. Everybody’s excited. It’s going to be fun.”

Bold, as always, from Anderson. He didn’t hold back about baseball's “kind of bad” marketing of the game and its players. He’s not the first to complain about it, but he was blunt.

“I’m to the point now in life, I’m trying to capture everything,” Anderson said. “I don’t want to miss nothing. That way when I do turn 70 or 80 all I gotta do is be like ‘pop that in, let me see what I was doing in my 20s, in my 30s, in my 40s.’ It’s about capturing every moment in my life.”

So far, all we’ve seen are spring training workout videos but Anderson says he will talk about big moments in games during the season.

“I’m just going to be as real as I can be, and I feel like YouTube is the best way to go about it and connect with my fans,” Anderson said. “We’re going to give you those conversations before games when we ride to the field or we’re going to give you those conversations that we’re talking about the game that happened before, like what you did. We’re going to give you those conversations on how you feel in those moments when you do those things on the field, whether it’s bat flip or pimp a home run. We’re going to give you that. We’re going to give you everything.”

The next time Anderson makes a big play or is involved in a controversial moment, he might be airing out his thoughts for the world to see on his YouTube channel. This could get interesting.

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