White Sox

White Sox morning roundup

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White Sox morning roundup

From yesterday:

Oney Guillen tweeted that his father could control "ANYBODY" with regard to Carlos Zambrano's move to Miami. But Ozzie Guillen hasn't controlled everybody, be that Nick Swisher, Brian Anderson or even Sean Tracey. All of those guys were eventually forced out. And, if we're going there, if Ozzie could control everybody he probably should've controlled Oney throughout his various twitter diatribes aimed against the organization, Bobby Jenks, etc.

Pat Mooney says the Ozzie-Zambrano union was bound to happen ever since Zambrano quit on the Cubs and Guillen moved on to Miami.

After Zambrano's June 25, 2010 dugout tirade, Guillen followed through with plans to go out to dinner with the suspended Cubs pitcher and told the media he could manage Zambrano.

If you're sick of Ozzie and don't care about Zambrano, the other bit of White Sox-related news we had from Wednesday was that former Sox top prospectthird basemanfirst basemanleft fielder Josh Fields (sidebar: remember when he played left? That was an...adventure) signed a minor-league deal with the Dodgers.

Andy Gray (@SI_Vault) tweeted out a photo of two nuns wearing Royals caps taking in a Kansas City - White Sox game from 1982.

James at White Sox Observer takes a look at valuations of a few former White Sox players, with one final note about Scott Linebrink and the Twins -- a match TwinsCentric's Parker Hageman says makes some sense.

And in inconsequential minor league news, the White Sox signed Corey Smith to a minor-league deal.

Around the division:

I'm not sure how Joe Saunders is in a position to have salary demands outside of the Tigers' price range, but that's what James Schmehl of the Detroit Free Press thinks. His 3.69 ERA last year was a mirage (he's never had a full year in his career with a FIP lower than 4.36), and moving back to the American League, even in a pitcher's park like Detroit, would almost certainly exacerbate a regression. So, in short, hopefully Saunders' price tag isn't out of Detroit's range.

And finally, Francisco Liriano will pitch in the Dominican Winter League, but won't throw more than 20 innings.

MLB, players deeply divided with clock ticking: 'It's ugly right now'

MLB, players deeply divided with clock ticking: 'It's ugly right now'

Where do things stand right now between Major League Baseball and the players union?

Let’s just say the owners are in New York and the players are in Los Angeles. Hopefully, they can meet somewhere in the middle — like Chicago — and we can have baseball in 2020.

But it's going to take a lot of work.

MLB's much-anticipated, first economic proposal presented to the players on Tuesday features a sliding scale of pay cuts where the players making the most money lose a greater percentage of their salaries, while those making less will have smaller cuts.  

The players' didn't like it one bit.

"The owners have a long way to go," one player said.

Fortunately, this isn’t the ninth inning of negotiations. There’s still time to make a deal.  

But with the clock ticking, there’s a big divide and harsh feelings that need to be addressed.

According to one agent, “I like to think I’m an optimist, but it’s ugly right now. While it’s a complicated situation, it comes down to money. The little hope I have is cooler and sensible heads [will] prevail.”

Will the two sides come to an agreement? If so, how and when?

That’s what I discussed with my NBC Sports Chicago colleagues Adam Hoge and Vinnie Duber on this Give Me Baseball edition of the White Sox Talk Podcast. 

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White Sox Talk Podcast: Players union unhappy with proposal by MLB owners

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: Players union unhappy with proposal by MLB owners

The MLB owners' proposal to the players union was said to be one that would get the two sides at least a little closer to an agreement, but the players seemed offended by what they were given.

Chuck Garfien is joined by Adam Hoge and Vinnie Duber to discuss what made the players so upset, how can this be fixed and whether the latest proposal ruined the trust between the players and owners.

(1:28) - What were the details of the new proposal the players immediately turned down?

(6:59) - Biggest issue between the two sides is money

(12:15) - Thoughts from anonymous players on the proposal

(19:19) - MLB is in a rough spot because the pandemic hit right at the start of the season

(24:50) - What gives you hope that there will be a season?

Listen here or below.

White Sox Talk Podcast

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