White Sox

White Sox morning roundup

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White Sox morning roundup

From yesterday:

First, the positive news: Gordon Beckham told MLB.com's Scott Merkin he's already improved his mental approach to the game and is ready for a fresh start in 2012. For someone who's offensive game has been incredibly disappointing in the last two seasons, that's an early good sign -- although, as mentioned in the White Sox Talk post, how he handles his first bout with adversity in 2012 will really let us know if Beckham's mental state has really changed.

Now, the not-so-positive news: One projection system has the White Sox, with their current roster, pegged at 77 wins. It's not a projection that should be taken as gospel at this point, but the real story about it is that the White Sox, before any trade of John Danks, Gavin Floyd or Carlos Quentin, are projected to win 77 games. Larry at South Side Sox did some number crunching as compared to CAIRO and came up with 78 wins.

As noted by The Wizard, last year's early CAIRO projected had the Sox at 84-78.

The Nationals could be a trade partner for Danks, according to FOX Sports' Ken Rosenthal, although it's possible Kenny Williams would be apprehensive toward dealing with Washington GM Mike Rizzo given their history.

Robin Ventura will have a part in the Dec. 21 performance of A Christmas Carol at The Goodman Theatre. Hopefully his acting cameo won't end in an argument about England's greatest prime minister like a fellow third baseman of his era.

The White Sox lost their lone Aussie, as Shane Lindsay signed a minor league deal with the Dodgers.

And Buddy Groom was either generally forbidden from pitching to Frank Thomas or was just really, really scared of the Big Hurt.

Around the division: LeVon Washington is awesome

Baseball players who are enjoyable follows on twitter include Brandon McCarthy, Logan Morrison and Nyjer Morgan. But the pure entertainment value of Cleveland Indians prospect LeVon Washington may top all of them. This is just one of many great examples:

embedly_twitter_51214357background:url(http:a0.twimg.comimagesthemestheme1bg.png) C0DEED; padding:20px; embedly_twitter_51214357 pbackground:fff;padding:10px 12px 0px 12px;margin:0;min-height:48px;color:000;font-size:18px;line-height:22px;-moz-border-radius:5px;-webkit-border-radius:5px embedly_twitter_51214357 .embedly_tweet_contentbackground:fff;padding:10px 12px 10px 12px;margin:0;min-height:48px;color:000;font-size:18px !important;line-height:22px;-moz-border-radius:5px;-webkit-border-radius:5px embedly_twitter_51214357 p span.metadatadisplay:block;width:100;clear:both;margin-top:0px;height:40px; padding-bottom: 12px; embedly_twitter_51214357 p span.metadata span.authorline-height:15px;color:999;font-size:14px embedly_twitter_51214357 p span.metadata span.author aline-height:15px;font-size:20px;vertical-align:middle embedly_twitter_51214357 p span.metadata span.author imgfloat:left;margin:0 10px 0 0px;width:48px;height:48px embedly_twitter_51214357 p a color: 0084B4; text-decoration:none; embedly_twitter_51214357 p a:hovertext-decoration:underline embedly_twitter_51214357 .embedly_timestampfont-size:13px;display:inline-block;margin-top: 5px; embedly_twitter_51214357 .components-above span.embedly_timestampfont-size:10px;margin-top: 1px;line-height:12px embedly_twitter_51214357 a color: 0084B4; text-decoration:none; embedly_twitter_51214357 a:hovertext-decoration:underline embedly_twitter_51214357 .tweet-screen-name font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; embedly_twitter_51214357 .tweet-full-name padding-left: 4px; color: 999; font-size: 12px; embedly_twitter_51214357 .tweet-actionsmargin-left: 10px;font-size:13px;display:inline-block;width:250px embedly_twitter_51214357 .components-above span.tweet-actionsfont-size:10px embedly_twitter_51214357 .controlsline-height:12px!important embedly_twitter_51214357 .tweet-actions a margin-left:5px embedly_twitter_51214357 .tweet-actions a bfont-weight:normal embedly_twitter_51214357 .components-above span.tweet-actions a bvertical-align:baseline;line-height:12px embedly_twitter_51214357 .components-above .tweet-textfont-size:13px;vertical-align:baseline embedly_twitter_51214357 .tweet-image float: left; width: 40px; embedly_twitter_51214357 .tweet-user-block-image float: left; width: 48px; height: 48px embedly_twitter_51214357 .tweet-row margin-left: 40px; margin-top: 3px;line-height: 17px; embedly_twitter_51214357 .tweet-user-block margin-left: -40px; embedly_twitter_51214357 .stream-item padding-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 12px; embedly_twitter_51214357 .simple-tweet-image img margin-top: 4px; embedly_twitter_51214357 .simple-tweet-content margin: 0 0 13px 0px; font-size: 14px; min-height:48px; embedly_twitter_51214357 .in-reply-to-border border-color: EBEBEB; border-style: solid; border-width: 1px 0 0; embedly_twitter_51214357 .in-reply-to-text margin-left: 4px; padding-left: 8px; padding-right: 10px; color: 999; font-size: 12px; embedly_twitter_51214357 .tweet-actions i background: transparent url(http:a2.twimg.coma1306889658phoeniximgsprite-icons.png) no-repeat;width:15px;height:15px;margin:0 4px -3px 3px;outline: none; text-indent:-99999px;vertical-align:baseline;display:inline-block;position:relative; embedly_twitter_51214357 .tweet-actions a.retweet-action i background-position:-192px 0; embedly_twitter_51214357 .tweet-actions a.reply-action i background-position:0 0; embedly_twitter_51214357 .tweet-actions a.favorite-action i background-position:-32px 0; @L_wash
LeVon WashingtonTHAT AWKWARD MOMENT WHEN UR MOM WALKS IN AND SEES U TAKING BP IN HER KITCHEN WITH A NERF BAT AN ALUMINUM FOIL WashTime
Dec 16 via Twitter for iPhoneFavoriteRetweetReply
He's a highly recommended follow if you're a fan of non-sequiters and caps lock. After all, as he says:

embedly_twitter_34819422background:url(http:a0.twimg.comimagesthemestheme1bg.png) C0DEED; padding:20px; embedly_twitter_34819422 pbackground:fff;padding:10px 12px 0px 12px;margin:0;min-height:48px;color:000;font-size:18px;line-height:22px;-moz-border-radius:5px;-webkit-border-radius:5px embedly_twitter_34819422 .embedly_tweet_contentbackground:fff;padding:10px 12px 10px 12px;margin:0;min-height:48px;color:000;font-size:18px !important;line-height:22px;-moz-border-radius:5px;-webkit-border-radius:5px embedly_twitter_34819422 p span.metadatadisplay:block;width:100;clear:both;margin-top:0px;height:40px; padding-bottom: 12px; embedly_twitter_34819422 p span.metadata span.authorline-height:15px;color:999;font-size:14px embedly_twitter_34819422 p span.metadata span.author aline-height:15px;font-size:20px;vertical-align:middle embedly_twitter_34819422 p span.metadata span.author imgfloat:left;margin:0 10px 0 0px;width:48px;height:48px embedly_twitter_34819422 p a color: 0084B4; text-decoration:none; embedly_twitter_34819422 p a:hovertext-decoration:underline embedly_twitter_34819422 .embedly_timestampfont-size:13px;display:inline-block;margin-top: 5px; embedly_twitter_34819422 .components-above span.embedly_timestampfont-size:10px;margin-top: 1px;line-height:12px embedly_twitter_34819422 a color: 0084B4; text-decoration:none; embedly_twitter_34819422 a:hovertext-decoration:underline embedly_twitter_34819422 .tweet-screen-name font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; embedly_twitter_34819422 .tweet-full-name padding-left: 4px; color: 999; font-size: 12px; embedly_twitter_34819422 .tweet-actionsmargin-left: 10px;font-size:13px;display:inline-block;width:250px embedly_twitter_34819422 .components-above span.tweet-actionsfont-size:10px embedly_twitter_34819422 .controlsline-height:12px!important embedly_twitter_34819422 .tweet-actions a margin-left:5px embedly_twitter_34819422 .tweet-actions a bfont-weight:normal embedly_twitter_34819422 .components-above span.tweet-actions a bvertical-align:baseline;line-height:12px embedly_twitter_34819422 .components-above .tweet-textfont-size:13px;vertical-align:baseline embedly_twitter_34819422 .tweet-image float: left; width: 40px; embedly_twitter_34819422 .tweet-user-block-image float: left; width: 48px; height: 48px embedly_twitter_34819422 .tweet-row margin-left: 40px; margin-top: 3px;line-height: 17px; embedly_twitter_34819422 .tweet-user-block margin-left: -40px; embedly_twitter_34819422 .stream-item padding-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 12px; embedly_twitter_34819422 .simple-tweet-image img margin-top: 4px; embedly_twitter_34819422 .simple-tweet-content margin: 0 0 13px 0px; font-size: 14px; min-height:48px; embedly_twitter_34819422 .in-reply-to-border border-color: EBEBEB; border-style: solid; border-width: 1px 0 0; embedly_twitter_34819422 .in-reply-to-text margin-left: 4px; padding-left: 8px; padding-right: 10px; color: 999; font-size: 12px; embedly_twitter_34819422 .tweet-actions i background: transparent url(http:a2.twimg.coma1306889658phoeniximgsprite-icons.png) no-repeat;width:15px;height:15px;margin:0 4px -3px 3px;outline: none; text-indent:-99999px;vertical-align:baseline;display:inline-block;position:relative; embedly_twitter_34819422 .tweet-actions a.retweet-action i background-position:-192px 0; embedly_twitter_34819422 .tweet-actions a.reply-action i background-position:0 0; embedly_twitter_34819422 .tweet-actions a.favorite-action i background-position:-32px 0; @L_wash
LeVon WashingtonWE ALL GONNA DIE ANYWAY.. MIGHT AS WELL FOLLOW WASH TIME. WHAT U GOT TO LOSE? WashTime
Dec 15 via Twitter for iPhoneFavoriteRetweetReply
Let's Go Tribe has a pretty great writeup using WashTime tweets as well.

In a less fun development, the Twins could still end up with Michael Cuddyer even after signing Josh Willingham, although Colorado may be Cuddyer's most likely destination. Speaking of Willingham, John Bonnes of Twins Geek ran down a few less-known things about the newest Twin.

If the Futures Game tells us anything, it's that the White Sox outfield of the future is ridiculously deep

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USA TODAY

If the Futures Game tells us anything, it's that the White Sox outfield of the future is ridiculously deep

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Just how deep is the White Sox outfield of the future?

The answer was embodied by the leadoff hitter in the Futures Game on Sunday afternoon in the nation’s capital.

Luis Alexander Basabe was one of two White Sox representatives in the prospect showcase held two days prior to baseball’s Midsummer Classic, along with pitcher Dylan Cease. And while Basabe was very deserving of the honor in the middle of a strong 2018 campaign — he blasted a two-run homer on a 102 mph pitch in the third inning — he’s not exactly the first name that comes to mind when running down the organization’s top prospects in the outfield.

MLB Pipeline ranks four outfielders — Eloy Jimenez, Luis Robert, Blake Rutherford and Micker Adolfo — ahead of Basabe on its list of White Sox prospects. And after Basabe come Ryan Cordell and Luis Gonzalez. And that’s before mentioning players outside the top 30 in the system, guys having big years like Joel Booker and Alex Call.

It makes for a lengthy list of possibilities to populate the outfield on the next contending White Sox squad.

“There’s a lot of players who have good ability, and that’s cool,” Basabe said Sunday. “I look at them, and I say, ‘They are good!’ And that makes me work more to be in the big leagues.”

That, of course, has been Rick Hahn’s goal all along during this rebuilding effort, to build as much depth throughout the farm system as possible.

That depth has been seemingly achieved among the organization’s starting-pitching corps, where Cease, Michael Kopech, Alec Hansen and Dane Dunning have joined current big leaguers Carlos Rodon, Lucas Giolito and Reynaldo Lopez as potential members of the rotation of the future.

The outfield, though, is equally loaded.

That depth is obvious with Basabe’s selection to the Futures Game. The White Sox are showing they deserve the title of one of baseball’s best farm systems when their No. 13 prospect is capable of reaching the game’s premier prospect event.

Of course, the other benefit of depth is tied to Basabe’s selection: It’s a heck of a safety net for the inevitable injuries that come with being a professional baseball player. Jimenez, Robert and Adolfo are all currently dealing with injuries of varying significance, with Adolfo out for the next eight to 10 months after having Tommy John surgery and Robert out for the second long stretch this season with a thumb injury.

No one is suggesting that these specific injuries will derail the careers of any of those three big talents. But being able to point to other young outfielders as backup plans is a key for any organization, especially one so focused on the future like the White Sox. Prospects succumbing to injuries or simply not reaching expectations is a reality of the game. But if such things should occur, the White Sox, at least, have quite the Plan Bs in the likes of Basabe, Rutherford, Gonzalez and more.

Take a look at the numbers the White Sox outfield prospects have put up this season.

— Jimenez: .313/.371/.541 with 12 homers and 46 RBIs in 65 with with Double-A Birmingham and Triple-A Charlotte

— Robert: .293/.372/.373 with five extra-base hits and nine RBNIs in 21 games with Class A Kannapolis and Class A Winston-Salem

— Adolfo: .283/.368/.466 with 11 homers and 50 RBIs in 78 games with Class A Winston-Salem

— Rutherford: .305/.348/.468 with 30 extra-base hits and 60 RBIs in 75 games for Class A Winston-Salem

— Basabe: .256/.356/.447 with 10 homers and 37 RBIs in 80 games with Class A Winston-Salem and Double-A Birmingham

— Gonzalez: .300/.352/.478 with nine homers, 26 doubles and 38 RBIsin 75 games with Class A Kannapolis and Class A Winston-Salem

— Booker: .285/.364/.440 with seven homers, 55 runs scored and 27 RBIs in 74 games with Class A Winston-Salem and Double-A Birmingham

— Call: .251/.359/.407 with seven homers and 36 RBIs in 77 games with Class A Winston-Salem and Double-A Birmingham

That’s all very, very good news for the White Sox.

Back in spring training, Jimenez, Robert and Adolfo talked about their desire to arrive on the South Side at about the same time and make up the team’s outfield one day. Well, there’s a good chance that the three outfielders on the next contending White Sox team will come from the above list of names.

“There’s a lot of competition,” Basabe said. “We’re here, this is what it’s about. We’ve got to compete.”

Yoan Moncada's knee will be fine, White Sox say, but what should we make of his roller-coaster first half?

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USA TODAY

Yoan Moncada's knee will be fine, White Sox say, but what should we make of his roller-coaster first half?

It sounds like Yoan Moncada’s knee is going to be fine.

The immediate future of that knee looked very much in question during the fifth inning of Saturday’s game against the visiting Kansas City Royals, when Moncada crumpled to the ground after getting hit in the knee with a baseball. He was in some pretty significant-looking pain, which after the game the second baseman likened to being hit with a hammer.

But Moncada hopes to play in the White Sox first-half finale Sunday, and manager Rick Renteria isn’t even leaning toward adding a fifth day to Moncada’s All-Star break until he sees how his second baseman feels Sunday.

It ended up being a good forecast for Moncada, who has had the definition of an up-and-down first half of his first full season in the major leagues.

While much of the talk has been about Moncada’s struggles so far this season, he’s actually been hitting very well over the past two weeks, coming into Saturday’s game with a .300/.391/.525 slash line and five extra-base hits, six RBIs and eight runs scored in the previous 10 games.

“I think he’s just being a little more aggressive in the zone early,” Renteria said. “He’s had quite a few really good at-bats over the last 10 days. Even if I think about (Friday), him walking the first three times, working deep counts, continues to be very focused in the zone. I mean, he understands the strike zone as good as anybody I’ve ever seen, regardless of how much time he has or doesn’t have in the big leagues. He’s got a really good idea.

“I think now he’s trying to take advantage of knowing that guys are going to try to come after you early. And if it’s in the zone, fire on that pitch. Get the barrel to it and do what you can.”

It’s a good stretch in a season that has to this point been defined by stretches for Moncada, who just a year ago was the No. 1 prospect in the game. Through the campaign’s first 17 games, his batting average was just barely higher than .200. Then he got hot for next 12 games before hitting the disabled list, which brought his season to a screeching halt. He returned in mid May and watched his batting average drop more than .020 points before the end of the month. In 46 games between May 15 and July 1, Moncada slashed .195/.242/.324. And then things finally reached an upswing in the last two weeks.

None of that tells the entire story, of course, good or bad.

Moncada has had his big moments, and Renteria, for one, continues to rave about Moncada’s mastery of the strike zone. But a look at the offensive averages leaves out other not-so-pretty areas of his game, like his major league leading 130 strikeouts and his 15 fielding errors, the third most in baseball.

Expectations were high for Moncada coming into the season and understandably so as the first-to-arrive major piece of this rebuilding effort. His acquisition in the Chris Sale trade followed by his White Sox debut last summer made his development the main storyline of this season.

So far, things have obviously not lived up to the hype, and Moncada isn’t happy, either, though he’s taking cues from his manager, Renteria, and teammate/mentor/friend, Jose Abreu, and looking at the positives.

“It hasn’t been as good as I wanted it to be,” Moncada said through a team translator on Friday. “But it hasn’t been as bad as you can think. It has been a challenging first half, but I’ve been learning a lot and working. I think the second half is going to be much better.”

Certainly this kind of performance from a young player (remember that Moncada is only 23 years old) isn’t completely unexpected. While he arrived in the majors after tearing up Triple-A, Moncada, as the White Sox brass will remind you, is not a finished product. None of these young players are. And the struggles at the plate and in the field could wind up not as harbingers of doom but simply as growing pains on the way to the big league stardom White Sox fans hope for from Moncada and all the other highly touted youngsters in the organization. Development isn’t linear, as Rick Hahn likes to say, and Moncada was perhaps never destined to improve in such dramatic fashion that it was visibly noticeable to the layman from one day to the next.

But at the same time, fans are understandably irked by repeating mistakes. In just the last handful of games, Moncada added to his strikeout total, made a fielding error that cost the White Sox a run and failed as a base runner to pick up a ball hit to the outfield, getting doubled up for a double play.

Talking specifically about the fielding error, Moncada’s 15th of the season, Renteria explained what happened — Moncada was trying a little too quickly to turn a double play — and that it is another learning moment in a season of them for these White Sox.

“Just something where you end up have to emphasize in a double play situation like that not to get anxious,” Renteria said. “You have to catch the ball first and then feed it to the guy on the other end. It’s not abnormal for young players to try to turn the DP from where they are at. It’s not the case. Receiving the ball fist and then giving the good feed. It’s not unheard of. It happens a lot. They speed it up a little bit.

“You go over it with him a little bit, and he cleans it up. That’s one more experience we can rely upon that didn’t turn out well but we can talk about it and have it run through his mind and see if he can understand exactly what we are talking about. He normally does.”

That’s all part of the development for Moncada, and like great players before him, rookie-year struggles in certain facets can disappear by the following season. Look at Kris Bryant on the other side of town, who led the National League with 199 strikeouts during his rookie season and has watched that number plummet in each season since. Perhaps Moncada will end up with similar results.

There’s been plenty to dislike about Moncada’s first half, but that doesn’t mean the flashes of brilliance weren’t there. Moncada carries the burden of expectations as one of the prospects touted as a main piece of the organization’s bright future. And just because the first half didn’t look like anyone wanted it to doesn’t mean he still can’t get to that point.

And hey, if the second half looks more like the last two weeks, maybe these first-half struggles fade into distant memory.