White Sox

White Sox players supported Adam LaRoche, son in Tuesday meeting

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White Sox players supported Adam LaRoche, son in Tuesday meeting

PHOENIX — Drake LaRoche has plenty of support within the White Sox clubhouse.

Both outfielder Adam Eaton and executive vice president Kenny Williams said Wednesday that players rallied behind the 14-year-old son of Adam LaRoche during a lengthy meeting Tuesday in which the veteran announced his abrupt retirement. Adam LaRoche informed teammates he intends to retire and forego a $13 million salary after Williams asked him to reduce Drake LaRoche’s clubhouse appearances. Players who had been around Drake LaRoche for the past year said they don’t want to see him or his father go. Eaton said the White Sox didn’t participate in their routine stretching because the meeting went long.

“We wanted Drake in the clubhouse, and we were backing Adam in every aspect,” Eaton said. “In that sense we’re going to miss him. He chose family over allowing his son to be in the clubhouse and we respect what he had to do. The man and the character that Adam LaRoche is, we’re not surprised he chose his family. He’s a God-fearing man, and you have to respect that. It is what it is, a tough little go at it, but I respect his decision.

“We can say we enjoyed Drake LaRoche in the clubhouse and everything he brought in the clubhouse. He brought perspective. He helped out and around, he wasn’t a burden by any stretch of the imagination. He wasn’t a big problem last year.”

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Drake LaRoche has been around the club on a consistent basis, at home and on the road, since Adam LaRoche signed with the White Sox for two seasons. He also has a locker stall in the clubhouse and did the same when his father played for the Washington Nationals.

Williams knew his decision wouldn’t be popular with players. But he said the choice is more about setting a precedent for future players and has nothing to do with Drake LaRoche’s behavior. Williams said he appreciates how his players rallied together in support of Adam LaRoche and his son during Tuesday’s meeting.

“One thing with regards to this that I really have felt really good about is we felt that they were banding together,” Williams said. “But the way that they banded together to try to protect this young man and their teammate and everything — I told them, it’s admirable, and I love the bond that’s been created.”

Eaton still wasn’t totally comfortable discussing the situation a day later. Technically, Adam LaRoche hasn’t finalized his retirement. But the White Sox also believe he doesn’t intend to retract it.

“I’m on eggshells,” Eaton said. “Adam (LaRoche) doesn’t want to make it a big deal, so it’s kind of tough for me to comment on it. I don’t think he was planning on retiring.

“Adam and Drake are probably the most respected people I’ve ever played with. Drake would clean cleats, he would help out in drills, he’d help pick up baseballs. He’d pick up baseballs if you needed to hit them. He didn’t say boo to anybody. Never a trouble in the clubhouse.”

Tim Anderson, White Sox teammates wear orange to support end to gun violence

Tim Anderson, White Sox teammates wear orange to support end to gun violence

Several members of the White Sox posted pictures Friday of their families donning orange T-shirts in support of bringing an end to gun violence in the United States.

June 5 is National Gun Violence Awareness Day, and those showing solidarity with the gun violence prevention movement are asked to wear orange, a gesture that started in Chicago, when Hadiya Pendleton’s friends wore the color after the 15-year-old was shot and killed in 2013.

Though this year's Wear Orange Weekend has gone digital due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, many are participating and showing solidarity online.

Anderson's charity, Tim Anderson's League of Leaders, posted pictures of Anderson, Adam Engel, Jace Fry, Leury Garcia, Carson Fulmer, Evan Marshall, Aaron Bummer, Ross Detwiler, Carlos Rodon, Yasmani Grandal, James McCann and their families all wearing special "White Sox families wear orange" T-shirts in support of the movement.

In January of 2013, Hadiya Pendleton, a high school student from the South Side was shot and killed on a playground in...

Posted by Anderson’s League Of Leaders on Friday, 5 June 2020

RELATED: Tim Anderson won't stick to sports: 'This problem is bigger than baseball'

#WearOrange 🧡 @everytown

Posted by Anderson’s League Of Leaders on Friday, 5 June 2020

Anderson has addressed the need to bring an end to gun violence through his work in the community on the South Side. His best friend, Branden Moss, was shot and killed in 2017.

 

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2020 MLB Draft: Reid Detmers is best player who could fall to White Sox

2020 MLB Draft: Reid Detmers is best player who could fall to White Sox

When the White Sox are on the clock next Wednesday in the first round of the MLB Draft, remember the name Reid Detmers.

If the former Louisville Cardinals left-hander with one of the coolest curveballs you will ever see is still available, the White Sox might have a steal on their hands.

“In my mind, (Detmers) is the best player who could fall to No. 11,” MLB.com draft expert Jim Callis said on the White Sox Talk Podcast. “I’m not saying he will. I think he’s the guy who could. That would be the best player you could probably hope for at 11 would be Reid Detmers.”

At 6-foot-2, 210 pounds, Detmers isn’t going to wow you with his velocity. His fastball tops off in the low-90s.

What he’s known for is a sweeping curveball that takes a wild scenic route to a whole other area code once it leaves Detmer’s hands, before somehow finding the catcher’s mitt on the other end of the rainbow.

“He has one of the best curveballs in the draft,” said Callis, which to me, is an understatement. Just watch this:


And this:


RELATED: Top 20 MLB Draft prospects: Who will White Sox pick at No. 11?

Right-handed pitcher Max Meyer, who is expected to be chosen ahead of Detmers next Wednesday, was recently asked by Callis on MLB Network if he could take one pitch from last year’s Team USA squad, whose would he take? Meyer chose Detmers’ curveball. Who wouldn’t? That thing is nasty.

During his 2019 season, abbreviated due to the coronavirus pandemic, Detmers dominated in his four starts, finishing 3-0 with a 1.23 ERA, 48 strikeouts and six walks in 22 innings. In 2019, he set Louisville’s single-season strikeout record with 167 strikeouts in 113.1 innings.

Detmers has a chance to not only be one of the best pitchers in the draft, Callis believes he could be the most major league ready, as well.

“To me, there’s a lot of good college pitching in this draft. That’s the strength of this draft. Reid Detmers is probably the first college starting pitcher in the big leagues in this draft,” Callis said.

But before you can pencil him into the starting rotation on the South Side in 2022, he’ll first have to be on the board when it’s the White Sox turn to pick. If he is, will the White Sox, with new scouting director Mike Shirley, choose him? We’ll learn next week.

In the meantime, check out the podcast with Callis. We go over several other options for the White Sox. There are some intriguing possibilities at multiple positions, including a former star shortstop from Mt. Carmel whose idol is Tim Anderson.

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