White Sox

White Sox prepare to face Orioles in empty stadium

emptycmaden042815.png

White Sox prepare to face Orioles in empty stadium

BALTIMORE -- After all options were considered, the White Sox and Baltimore Orioles will resume their disrupted series Wednesday afternoon in front of an empty stadium.

In deference to city and state officials and law enforcement, the Orioles and Major League Baseball determined Tuesday afternoon to move the start time of Wednesday’s game up by five hours to 2:05 p.m. EST in a contest that is closed to the public.

After several days of civil unrest following the death of Freddie Gray, MLB and the two clubs -- who already canceled contests on Monday and Tuesday -- don’t want to jeopardize the public safety efforts of local law enforcement, whose resources may be needed elsewhere. The Orioles also announced that Monday and Tuesday’s games would be made up in a May 28 doubleheader.

“We tried to make it clear from the start: we’ll do what everyone feels is in the best interest of everyone’s safety and getting the games played in the best environment that we can under the circumstances,” White Sox general manager Rick Hahn said from Eutaw Street outside of Camden Yards on Tuesday afternoon. “We’re willing to do whatever it takes to get these games played in the safest possible way.”

Hahn said both clubs offered potential solutions after the cancellation of Monday’s game about 50 minutes before first pitch. With a citywide curfew in effect beginning at 10 p.m. Tuesday for the next week, MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred said Monday that all options would be considered, including potentially moving venues.

Even though Nationals Park is only 40 miles away and not in use this week, the Washington Post reported Tuesday that the Orioles never called to request use of the site. That could be related to a television rights dispute between the clubs related to MASN, the sports network the two teams share.

[WATCH: Dan Hayes sets the scene of unrest in Baltimore]

Other scenarios considered included moving up Tuesday’s first pitch to as early as 1 p.m. White Sox manager Robin Ventura had his players on call Tuesday morning in case they needed to be at the park.

But none of those options ever came to fruition.

The Orioles have already moved this weekend’s home series with the Tampa Bay Rays to Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla.

“There was talk of us playing today, playing during the daytime,” Ventura said before an impromptu afternoon workout. “I know there’s a curfew they have in place here for the next week. There was a chance we could get a phone call and we’re playing during the daytime. For us, we’re just sitting and waiting. I know the Orioles are too. It’s sensitive for everybody.”

The waiting ends Wednesday afternoon in what promises to be one of the more surreal scenes in MLB history. The normally packed 45,971-seat venue will be almost completely empty when White Sox leadoff man Adam Eaton faces Baltimore’s Ubaldo Jimenez.

Eaton, Hahn and White Sox catcher Tyler Flowers all said the experience is akin to B games in spring training and minor league promotions.

“The only disadvantage may be for the home team because you kind of feed off the energy,” Eaton said. “When you're on the road there's not much energy in your favor usually. If anything Baltimore may be slighted a little bit.”

[WHITE SOX ROAD AHEAD: Will Carlos Rodon see a start on road trip?]

Said Flowers: “Catching wise it might be more pleasant for me, not hearing people make fun of me. I think I'll be locked in when I'm on the field.”

Either way, the scene promises to be different. English Premier League events have been played in similar circumstances after fan issues but Hahn couldn’t recall any sporting events in the U.S. being played in empty stadiums.

As strange as it may be, Hahn and the White Sox are on board with the plan.

“It’s going to be an interesting experience, a little bit different but obviously from a safety standpoint it makes sense,” Hahn said. “Also it helps potentially relieve some of the logjams later in the season in terms of makeup games. We certainly support the decision of Major League Baseball and the Orioles and we’ll be here ready to go.”

White Sox free-agent focus: Marwin Gonzalez

White Sox free-agent focus: Marwin Gonzalez

This week, we’re profiling some of the biggest names on the free-agent market and taking a look at what kind of fits they are for the White Sox.

The best way to plan for a future full of unknowns is to cover all your bases — and all the spots in your outfield, too.

Marwin Gonzalez is going to be a very popular man on the free-agent market this offseason because he is one of the most demonstrably versatile players in the game. He’s been a do-it-all savior for the Houston Astros in recent seasons, part of their rise from baseball’s cellar to a world championship in 2017 and their current status as one of the best teams out there.

During the 2018 season alone, Gonzalez appeared at every position except pitcher and catcher, playing 73 games in left field, 39 at shortstop, 32 at second base, 24 at first base, three at third base, two in center field, one at designated hitter and one in right field. That versatility is practically unmatched throughout the game, and it’s likely to get the soon-to-be-30-year-old Gonzalez a nice contract this winter.

For a rebuilding team like the White Sox, he’d be a perfect fit, chiefly because there’s still so much to play out in this rebuilding process and it’s difficult to figure out where the future holes will be. In Gonzalez, the White Sox could add someone now who could fill any number of those potential weak spots, be they caused by failed development or injuries down the road.

But what about his offense? If there is a reason to stay away from Gonzalez, it’s the significant dropoff in his offensive numbers last season. In 2017, the season he helped the Astros win their first-ever World Series title, he slashed .303/.377/.530 with 23 home runs and 90 RBIs, finishing in the top 20 in AL MVP voting. In 2018, he slashed .247/.324/.409 with 16 home runs and 68 RBIs — and that’s with more playing time, his games played jumping from 134 to 145 and his plate appearances jumping from 515 to 552.

Is that enough to scare teams away? That remains to be seen.

Would Gonzalez be a good fit for the White Sox? It sure seems that way, though there are perhaps 29 other teams that could say the same thing.

Jose Abreu is an All-Star starter and Silver Slugger, but will he be with the White Sox past 2019?

1114_jose_abreu.jpg
USA TODAY

Jose Abreu is an All-Star starter and Silver Slugger, but will he be with the White Sox past 2019?

It was Jose Abreu's worst season in the major leagues. And he still started the All-Star Game and won a Silver Slugger.

The White Sox have a decision to make at some point, though not necessarily this offseason, on what to do with Abreu in the long term. His on-field production isn't a question. His role as an off-field mentor isn't a question. But when Opening Day 2020 rolls around, he'll be 33 years old. Does that "align" — to borrow a word used very often by Rick Hahn at last week's GM Meetings — with the White Sox long-term plans?

Abreu's entering the final season of his current contract coming off a year defined as much by freak injuries and a prolonged slump as by the accolades he received in spite of those things. For the first time as a big leaguer, he finished a season without hitting at least 25 homers and racking up at least 100 RBIs. Only playing in 128 games, he posted career lows in most stat categories, with his 36 doubles, the second most in his career, a notable exception. His .473 slugging percentage was only the second lowest of his five-year major league career.

But if the awards were any indication — though it should be added there was a dearth of productive first basemen in the American League last season — he still has the ability to be one of the game's best at his position. His 162-game average over the course of the past five seasons: a .295/.353/.516 slash line with 32 home runs and 107 RBIs. Three times in five seasons, Abreu has received MVP votes, finishing as high as fourth during his Rookie of the Year season in 2014.

And on top of all those numbers, Abreu has earned consistent praise for his role off the field. He's been an omnipresent mentor to Yoan Moncada, who's not even two years removed from being the No. 1 prospect in baseball, with the two Cubans' lockers right next to each other in the White Sox clubhouse. And Abreu is touted as an example to all the team's young players, who can look to him as a model for how to go about one's business and prepare on a daily basis.

So the value is obvious. But in order to make a decision on Abreu, the White Sox have to figure out when their planned contention window is going to open. Significant injuries to a host of their highly touted prospects — most notably the elbow injury that forced Michael Kopech into Tommy John surgery — has muddied the waters when it comes to predicting when this wave of minor league talent will was ashore on the South Side.

If that year is soon, if it's still 2020, then having a 33-year-old Abreu in the middle of the order doesn't seem like a bad thing at all. But in order to make that happen, the White Sox will need to give him a contract extension at some point before this time next year, or they'll have to give him a new contract if he were to reach the free-agent market. If the year when the contention window opens is much past 2020, how old is too old to help the White Sox make a championship run? When does the dropoff in production that comes with most aging players arrive?

The White Sox talk highly of Abreu, giving no indication they plan to move on from the guy they spent lavishly on after the 2013 season. And for his part, Abreu continues to talk glowingly about the White Sox and remains committed to saying that he hopes to be in Chicago for the foreseeable future.

"Everybody knows that 2019 is going to be the last season of my current contract, but I try not to think about that because I am part of the White Sox and I believe that I’m going to be part of this organization for a very long time," he said through a translator during a Tuesday conference call with reporters. "That’s something that’s out of my hands right now because I have one season left on this current contract.

"But in case the next season is my last one, I’d like to thank all the White Sox organization and all the people who have been around me during my time on this team, especially the owner, Jerry (Reinsdorf). He has been an outstanding person to me. He’s one of the greatest people that I’ve met in this country.

"But I try not to think about that because I truly believe that I’m going to be part of this organization for a very long time. But we’ll see. I know that this is a business, and that’s the way you have to approach it."

That answer to a reporter's question covered all the bases, a masterclass in the public-relations friendly response. But Abreu does always come off as someone who wants to stick with this team. He knows what's going on in the minor league system and he knows how bright the White Sox future is.

And the White Sox know what Abreu can do. Their reported desire to trade Avisail Garcia might be an indication they're ready to move on from their older players, but Garcia and Abreu are vastly different cases, with Abreu far more productive on the field and more commonly discussed as an asset to the young players off it.

During the 2017 season, the decision on Abreu seemed an easy one for the White Sox: Keep this extraordinarily productive player and team leader around as long as you can. But injuries might have made that decision more difficult — and not the freak ones Abreu suffered during the season, but the ones suffered by prospects that might have changed the timeline of this whole thing, and therefore the "alignment" of Abreu and this team's bright future.