Cubs

Cubs ink four to minor league contracts

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Cubs ink four to minor league contracts

The Cubs made some minor moves Wednesday, inking four players to deals just before the Thanksgiving holiday.

Chicago signed outfielder Brian Bogusevic, infielder Alberto Gonzalez, outfielder Johermyn Chavez and catcher J.C. Boscan to minor league contracts.

Bogusevic, 28, was born in Oak Lawn and attended high school at the De La Salle Institute in Chicago. The Astros took him 24th overall in the 2005 draft. He began his career as a left-handed pitcher, but hasn't thrown an inning since 2008 after he racked up a 5.05 ERA in 77 minor-league outings (64 starts).

Bogusevic has primarily played outfield since '08, making his way through the Astros' minor league system. He's bounced between Triple-A and the big leagues over the past three seasons.

In 618 plate appearances in with the Astros since 2010, Bogusevic has put up a .227.310.346 batting line with 11 homers, 24 doubles and 66 runs. He can play all three outfield positions and has some speed, with 94 career stolen bases between the majors and minors.

Gonzalez is a 29-year-old journeyman from Venezuela, appearing with the Yankees, Nationals, Padres and Rangers over the past five seasons after starting his career with the Diamondbacks. He has played all four infield positions in the majors over the past couple of seasons, notching more than 130 games at both second base and shortstop. He's never shown much with the bat, boasting a .242.279.317 line in the MLB to go along with a .714 career minor league OPS.

Boscan has garnered 20 plate appearances with the Braves over the past three seasons, but has spent the majority of his time catching in the minors. The 32-year-old Venezuelan began his career with the Braves before making stops in Milwaukee and Cincinnati and returning to Atlanta. He has caught more than 1,000 games in his career, but boasts just a .614 minor league OPS.

Chavez is also from Venezuela, but the 23-year-old outfielder has yet to rise above Double-A. He's shown patience and some pop with the bat, sporting a .263.341.442 line in the minors. Chavez, who hit 32 homers in High-A ball in 2010, has seen time primarily as a corner outfielder, but has played a bit of center, too.

Cubs Talk Podcast: Checking in with Joe & Theo at the Winter Meetings

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USA TODAY

Cubs Talk Podcast: Checking in with Joe & Theo at the Winter Meetings

Tony Andracki goes 1-on-1 with manager Joe Maddon at the Winter Meetings in Las Vegas. The Cubs manager touches on his efforts to put art back into the game, his biggest challenge in 2019, the Cubs' sense of urgency and his thoughts about Matt Nagy and the Bears (:30).

Plus, we catch up with Cubs President of Baseball Operations Theo Epstein, who discusses internal team leadership, whether or not the Cubs are close to a deal and how Maddon is changing up his coaching style (5:45).

Listen to the full episode at this link or in the embedded player below:

Cubs Talk Podcast

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Where do Javy Baez and Anthony Rizzo fit in Cubs leadership equation?

Where do Javy Baez and Anthony Rizzo fit in Cubs leadership equation?

LAS VEGAS — All this talk about the Cubs' desire for more leadership on the roster has raised several questions and chief among them is wondering what it says about the core players already on the team.

If the Cubs have a leadership void — as Theo Epstein and Jed Hoyer have said this month — does that mean players like Anthony Rizzo, Jason Heyward, Ben Zobrist and Javy Baez are not leaders?

Epstein confirmed Tuesday afternoon at the MLB Winter Meetings that the Cubs feel they have plenty of leadership on the roster, but they're looking more for that one guy — a veteran who has been around the block and isn't afraid to call somebody out or hold teammates accountable. The David Ross or Jon Jay mold, as Hoyer said Monday.

Rizzo is the face of the franchise and the driving force in the lineup every day, but he's still only 29 and developing as a leader. 

Heyward isn't real vocal, but when he does speak up, it carries a lot of weight — as the famous Rain Delay Speech indicates. 

Zobrist can talk hitting for hours and it's easy to see him becoming a coach whenever his playing career is done. But he isn't super vocal by nature, either.

Baez is an interesting case as he is quickly becoming an impactful leader for this team. In the process of putting up a huge breakout 2018 campaign that earned him a second-place finish in NL MVP voting, Baez became one of the most outspoken players in the dugout and clubhouse.

His instincts and baseball IQ are off the charts and he sees the game on a whole other level, which lends a different viewpoint to the squad. 

When the Cubs were handed a disappointing and abrupt early offseason, it was Baez that stood at his locker for nearly a half hour, ranting about how the team lacked urgency and an edge for most of the year.

Baez is starting to emerge as a true leader, but March 28, 2019 will only represent his third big-league Opening Day and he still has played in just 527 games at baseball's highest level.

"Javy is as respected as anyone in that clubhouse and is just starting to find his voice," Epstein said. "That's probably the next step for him — speaking up a little bit more. But by the way he plays the game, how much he cares about winning, how tough he is, he's got everyone's respect and attention."

Epstein said Rizzo is making it his personal mission to take his leadership to another level.

Epstein and Hoyer and the rest of the front office are taking responsibility for the "miscalculation" that the 2018 Cubs did not need — or have room on the roster — for one of those leaders.

Now they're trying to fix that for 2019 by attempting to add the right guy into the mix.

But what type of leader are the Cubs seeking?

"It's really certain leadership you need from the right bench guy who's not expecting a ton more playing time, who's content at where he is in his career — he's just completely invested in winning, invested in his teammates," Epstein said. "Those little difficult conversations that you have to have sometimes. Or bringing energy on a day where the everyday guys are dragging.

"That's an important role on a club, but please don't take it the wrong way that we think there's some deficiency with our position players. We have incredible guys and a lot of character there and some leaders — they're just continuing to grow into it."

What is it that Ross provided this club that they haven't been able to duplicate since he left?

Here's a perfect example:

"David was unusual, because Dave would grab guys walking off the field after a play," Joe Maddon said Tuesday. "And I would be entertained in my corner watching this whole thing unfold. I would address it afterwards. There's nothing wrong with that. I know that some of the guys were afraid to come in the dugout. And still that's OK, because they knew David was on their side.

"Yes, we want that. I would say that every team out here wants that and they're hard to find."