Cubs

Why Sammy Sosa compared himself to Jesus Christ in candid interview

Why Sammy Sosa compared himself to Jesus Christ in candid interview

For more than a decade, Cubs fans probably thought Sammy Sosa could walk on water.

They weren't alone in that respect.

In a recent tell-all interview with Chuck Wasserstrom, Sosa compared himself to Jesus Christ being accused of being a witch when the Cubs icon was asked about being accused of PEDs.

"Chuck, it’s like Jesus Christ when he came to Jerusalem," Sosa says. "Everybody thought Jesus Christ was a witch (laughing) – and he was our savior. So if they talk (poop) about Jesus Christ, what about me?"

Talk about a God complex.

It's been 10 years since Sosa last suited up in the big leagues — and 13 years since his Cubs career ended — but the slugger is still just as polarizing as ever in the candid interview. Wasserstrom was let go by Theo Epstein and the Cubs in 2012 after spending 24 years in the organization in the media relations and baseball information departments.

[RELATED - Between Cubs' victory lap and Hall of Fame vote, Sammy Sosa barely staying in the picture]

Sosa talks a lot about his pride and it's very clear from his answers about coming back to Chicago and being a part of the current Cubs product that his pride is a major factor steering his ship even still.

He even drops a line in there:

"When nobody knew who Chicago was, I put Chicago on the map."

I'm not sure exactly what he means by that, to be honest. I would venture almost everybody in the world knew what Chicago was before 1992. It is the third biggest city in America.

If he means the Cubs, well, the Cubs were Lovable Losers and a draw for so many people well before Sosa got there. 

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Of course, Sosa did do some absolutely incredible things for the Cubs and the entire game of baseball. Many believe he and Mark McGwire helped put baseball on the map again in a resurgent 1998 season that helped make the strike of 1994/95 an afterthought. Count me among that group, as well.

He deserves all the credit in the world. People would show up to Wrigley just to see Sosa run out to the right field bleachers and camera bulbs flashed by the thousands every single time he came up to the plate for the better part of a decade. Waveland was sometimes so packed with ballhawks that there wouldn't be room to walk.

I also agree wholeheartedly with Sosa when he says, "you're never going to see the show Mark [McGwire] and I put on [again]." He's right. That was an event that transfixed the nation and will absolutely be something I tell my kids and grandkids and — hopefully — my greatgrandkids about.

Sosa continued to push the onus of any possible reunion with the Cubs on the orgainzation, saying he would absolutely say "yes" if they ever extended an invite to join Wrigley Field.

But he wants to do it "in style."

"If one day they want to do something, I want to do it in style. If it’s going to happen, it’s got to be the right way. Don’t worry, one day they’re going to do it. I’m not in a rush.”

Sosa also said he would rather have all the money — he earned more than $124 million in his career — than be in the Hall of Fame.

Go read the entire interview with Wasserstrom. It's as transparent as you'll see Sosa, especially nowadays.

How Cubs stack up, according to WAR, from 2015-19

How Cubs stack up, according to WAR, from 2015-19

The Cubs made the playoffs four times in five seasons under Joe Maddon, receiving contributions across the diamond from All-Stars and role players alike.

Some players, of course, had bigger impacts for Maddon's Cubs, even in smaller sample sizes. Jesse Chavez and Cole Hamels weren't Cubs for long, but the two 2018 trade deadline pickups helped the North Siders reach the postseason for a fourth straight year.

These are the top 25 players by WAR (wins above replacement) from the Maddon era, according to Baseball Reference.

Top 25 Cubs, according to WAR, from 2015-19

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How Ian Happ promotes mental health and other things to know about Cubs outfielder

How Ian Happ promotes mental health and other things to know about Cubs outfielder

It's kind of hard to believe 2020 is only Ian Happ's fourth season in the big leagues. The 25-year-old burst onto the scene with 24 home runs in 2017, and since has been through trials and tribulations, getting demoted to the minor leagues in 2019.

Whenever the 2020 season kicks off, Happ is in line for the starting center field job. Until then, here's a few things to know about him.

1. Happ attended University of Cincinnati from 2012-15, where he studied finance. He was a star on the field (2015 American Athletic Conference Player of the Year) and an exemplary student in the classroom (3.68 GPA, 2015 Academic All-American).

2. Happ is an avid golfer and is a 2 handicap, according to Golf Digest. He competed in the Straight Down Fall Classic in San Luis Obispo, Calif., the last two Novembers.

3. Happ serves as an honorary ambassador for First Tee Greater Chicago, which strives to introduce the game of golf to young people. The organization raised $23,000 at a January fundraiser Happ participated in.

4. In 2019, Happ and artist Patrick Vale started “Through My Eyes” — a three-piece artwork series capturing Wrigley Field from different perspectives. Proceeds go to the Happ Family Charitable Fund, which promotes mental health and wellness.

Happ lost his father, Keith, to brain cancer in 2015.

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