Cubs

Ian Happ, Nico Hoerner and other Cubs start a podcast during quarantine

Ian Happ, Nico Hoerner and other Cubs start a podcast during quarantine

Looking for some media to consume during the COVID-19 quarantine? A couple of Cubs got you covered.

Cubs Ian Happ, Nico Hoerner and minor leaguers Dakota Mekkes and Zack Short launched a podcast Saturday named "The Compound." It's fitting, considering the four are still training at the Cubs' spring training compound in Arizona.

In Episode 1, the four discuss the best and worst parts of their days, their dream all-time lineups for a hypothetical World Series Game 7 and take fan questions.

#Content

The MLB season is delayed indefinitely during the coronavirus pandemic, but this is a new, unique way to keep up with some Cubs players in the meantime.

Cubs Talk Podcast: Bobby Scales on impacting change in baseball, America

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USA TODAY

Cubs Talk Podcast: Bobby Scales on impacting change in baseball, America

Bobby Scales, a former Cub and now field coordinator with the Pittsburgh Pirates, joins David Kaplan and Gordon Wittenmyer to discuss racial injustice in America and the experience of a black baseball player in MLB.

(1:55) - America is in a dark place right now

(9:40) - Racial issues in the MLB

(16:20) - There is a reason protests are going on around the country

(24:58) - Making front offices more diverse in the MLB

(31:46) - Reaction to Dexter Fowler's comments on being black in baseball and in America

Listen here or below.

Cubs Talk Podcast

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MLBPA's Tony Clark: Players reject pay concessions, want to 'get back to work'

MLBPA's Tony Clark: Players reject pay concessions, want to 'get back to work'

Economic negotiations between MLB and the players association seem to be at a standstill.

After a conference call between the MLBPA executive board and more than 100 players on Thursday, the union stood its ground against additional salary reductions.

“In this time of unprecedented suffering at home and abroad,” MLBPA executive director Tony Clark said Thursday in a union release, “Players want nothing more than to get back to work and provide baseball fans with the game we all love. But we cannot do this alone.”  

The owners had proposed an 82-game season and salary cuts on a sliding scale, with the highest-paid players taking the largest cuts. In a counterproposal earlier this week, the players association suggested a 114-game season, with expanded playoffs in 2020 and 2021. The plan allowed for some salary deferrals in the case of a cancelled postseason, partially addressing the owners’ fears of a second wave of COVID-19 wiping out lucrative postseason TV deals. The players dismissed the idea of additional pay cuts, on top of the prorated salaries they agreed to in March.

“Earlier this week, Major League Baseball communicated its intention to schedule a dramatically shortened 2020 season unless Players negotiate salary concessions,” Clark continued. “The concessions being sought are in addition to billions in Player salary reductions that have already been agreed upon.”

Clark is referring to language in the March agreement that owners reportedly believe gives commissioner Rob Manfred the power to set the schedule for the 2020 season if the players and owners cannot reach an agreement. ESPN’s Jeff Passan reported on Monday that the league was considering a regular season of about 50 games, during which players would be entitled to their full prorated salaries.

“The overwhelming consensus of the Board,” Clark said, “is that Players are ready to report, ready to get back on the field, and they are willing to do so under unprecedented conditions that could affect the health and safety of not just themselves, but their families as well. The league’s demand for additional concessions was resoundingly rejected.”

While negotiations between MLB and the players association slowed to a stalemate, both the NHL and NBA made progress toward returning to play Thursday. The NHL and its players union agreed to a 24-team playoff format for the 2020 postseason. The NBA Board of Governors approved a 22-team plan to restart the season in Orlando.