Cubs

Report: People around baseball believe Joe Girardi is waiting for managerial job with Cubs or White Sox

1022_joe_girardi.jpg
USA TODAY

Report: People around baseball believe Joe Girardi is waiting for managerial job with Cubs or White Sox

Joe Girardi won't be the manager of the Cincinnati Reds in 2019, perhaps because he has hopes of landing a gig in Chicago.

According to Fancred's Jon Heyman, Girardi was in the running for the Reds' managerial job (which went to former Cubs third-base coach David Bell this weekend) but pulled himself out, this after interviewing for but not getting the same position with the Texas Rangers. Heyman cites "industry speculation" that Girardi might want to remain a free agent so he can land the job of skipper in Chicago.

Heyman is of course not specific, listing a city with two major league teams, leaving this open for interpretation as either the Cubs or the White Sox.

Obviously Girardi has a history on the North Side. He had two stints there as a player, from 1989 to 1992 and again from 2000 to 2002. Joe Maddon has one year remaining on his contract, and Cubs president Theo Epstein said during his end-of-season press conference that the team has not had discussions with Maddon about an extension. After managing the New York Yankees to their most recent World Series championship in 2009, Girardi might again want a crack at managing a big-market contender.

But if Girardi is simply itching to get back to his home state — he was born in Peoria and graduated from Northwestern — perhaps he has the White Sox on his wish list, too. Rick Renteria has one year remaining on his current contract, as well, and should the rebuilding White Sox see all their young talent turn into the contender they've planned, the manager of such a team would be an attractive position to hold.

But just because folks believe Girardi wants to manage in Chicago doesn't mean there'd be mutual interest. Despite Epstein's comments that there have been no extension talks with Maddon, the president of baseball operations also backed his manager in that same press conference, refusing to blame Maddon for the team's "broken" offense down the stretch last month. And Rick Hahn and the rest of White Sox brass heap frequent praise on the job Renteria has done in his two years, describing him as an important part of player development and of establishing a culture hoped to spread throughout the organization.

Plus, it's worth mentioning that Girardi's decade-long tenure in the Bronx came to an end amid suggestion that he was unable to connect with his young players. It's unknown how much of a realistic concern that would be for any team thinking about hiring him. But the recently fired Chili Davis believed that very issue was part of the reason his time as the Cubs' hitting coach came to an end. And there are few teams out there younger than the White Sox.

Again, it's just speculation for now. But if for some reason one or both Chicago teams don't hand out new contracts to their current managers, perhaps Girardi would be interested in an opening on either side of town.

MLB Players Association is 'disappointed' with league's financial proposal

MLB Players Association is 'disappointed' with league's financial proposal

Major League Baseball has a new approach to reducing the financial toll of playing without fans. And it's highly unpopular within the players association.

The financial proposal the owners presented the MLBPA on Tuesday included additional pay cuts, on top of the players’ already prorated salaries, according to multiple reports. Those cuts would affect all players but range depending on the player's pay, with the highest-paid players taking on the largest burden.

The players association characterized the proposal as “extremely disappointing,” and described the cuts as “massive.”

ESPN reported that the highest-paid players could receive less than 40 percent of their full-season salaries. MLB Network’s Jon Heyman reported that it could be as low as 20-30 percent for the likes of Mike Trout, Gerrit Cole, Justin Verlander and Max Scherzer.

“We made a proposal to the union that is completely consistent with the economic realities facing our sport," the league said in a statement to MLB Network. "We look forward to a responsive proposal from the MLBPA.”
Tuesday’s proposal abandoned the idea of a 50-50 revenue split, which the owners floated two weeks ago. Although the revenue split was not formally presented to the players, when reports of the owner’s plan became public, it received immediate pushback.

First of all, the union opposed a system associated with salary-capped leagues. The players association has been consistent for decades in its stance against a salary cap.

Secondly, the owners and players were at odds over the interpretation of their March agreement. In late March, players agreed to prorated salaries for the upcoming shortened season. The owners claimed that the language of the agreement allowed them to revisit the issue of player pay if the season had to go on without fans. The union disagreed.

MLB’s first financial proposal to the players association avoids a clash over revenue splitting but does nothing to address the latter concern.

Pay cuts are just one aspect of the upcoming financial negotiations.  Tension in financial negotiations has revealed just how far the players and owners are from agreement on health-and-safety protocols as well.

 

Gordon Whittenmyer contributed to the reporting of this story.

Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts: 'We’d definitely like to see baseball back'

Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts: 'We’d definitely like to see baseball back'

Should MLB and the players union come to terms on a 2020 season, clubs will suffer revenues losses due to the expected lack of fans at most or all games. But if it comes down to playing or not, Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts prefers the former.

Ricketts said Tuesday the organization "definitely" would rather play an abbreviated 2020 season despite reports suggesting clubs could lose more money under the March agreement to pay players prorated salaries than not playing at all.

"We’ll have to see how it goes but we’d definitely like to see baseball back," Ricketts said on CNBC's 'The Exchange.' "We’d like to see the team back on the field. I know the players want to play, I know the manager wants to manage and I know even if it’s on television only, I think people want to see baseball back."

MORE: Why Cubs, MLB might face 2020 season without key players and what it means

Major League Baseball is meeting with the union on Tuesday to propose financial terms for the 2020 season. NBC Sports Chicago reported Saturday that proposal is expected to be a compromise from the potential 50-50 revenue split previously reported. 

According to MLB insider Jon Heyman, that proposal includes paying players a portion of their prorated salaries, and those with higher salaries would take the biggest pay cuts.

Ricketts suggested in a best-case scenario, the Cubs might make 20 percent of their usual revenues, which appears tied to the one-time startup cost for the club's TV network, Wrigley Field construction costs and buying surrounding buildings in Wrigleyville. Those numbers are disputed by some, however, as owners don't open their books.

MLB's proposal for the season entails a second 'spring' training starting in mid-June, with Opening Day coming around the Fourth of July. Ricketts said the latter isn't out of the question. However, those dates are contingent on the league and union reaching an agreement in the near future.

"It really comes down to how quickly and efficiently the league and the union can get together and hack through the issues," he said.

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of the Chicago Cubs easily on your device.