Cubs

Report says Giancarlo Stanton would approve trade to four teams — including the Cubs

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USA TODAY

Report says Giancarlo Stanton would approve trade to four teams — including the Cubs

Here’s an offseason bombshell no one saw coming: Giancarlo Stanton would approve a trade to the Cubs.

The National League MVP is believed to almost surely be traded away from the Miami Marlins in the coming weeks, with the Marlins’ new ownership group led by Derek Jeter looking to shed salary. But while much of the conversation around Stanton’s departure from South Florida has focused on the San Francisco Giants, St. Louis Cardinals and Los Angeles Dodgers, a Thursday night report suggested that the Cubs are one of four teams that Stanton, who has a full no-trade clause, would approve a trade to.

As you’ll notice, the aforementioned Giants and Cardinals aren’t on that list.

Now, none of this means that the Cubs have shown formal interest or even talked with the Marlins about a deal. In fact, earlier reports laid out that the Marlins had agreed to the frameworks of trades with the Cardinals and Giants and were awaiting Stanton’s approval. But this latest news would seem set to shake everything up, with neither of those teams on his list.

Stanton, a right fielder known for his incredible power, tore the cover off the ball in 2017. He smacked 59 homers, putting him in the top 10 all-time for long balls in a single season. It’s the most anyone’s hit in more than a decade and a half, when Barry Bonds and Sammy Sosa hit 73 and 64 home runs, respectively, in 2001. Stanton also led baseball with 132 RBIs and led the NL with a .631 slugging percentage, edging Joey Votto for MVP honors in the Senior Circuit.

The 28-year-old Stanton is about to enter the fourth year of a massive 13-year contract that has him under team control through 2028. Of course, it comes with a hefty price tag. He’s set to make $25 million in 2018, and his annual salary peaks at $32 million a year from 2023 through 2025.

There’s a great argument to be made, though, that he’s well worth hit: Stanton’s already hit 267 homers in his eight big league seasons.

Now, with a depleted farm system after trades for Aroldis Chapman and Jose Quintana in each of the last two seasons, the Cubs wouldn’t figure to have the minor league assets a rebuilding team like the Marlins might desire. That could mean this is all just a Stanton wish list rather than a rumor with legs. But at the same time, the Cubs have several young, affordable position players at the major league level, guys like Kyle Schwarber and Ian Happ, who have been involved in trade speculation this offseason.

Would that be enough to reel in a fish as big as Stanton, though?

While the Cubs have an already-crowded outfield — though in order to land Stanton, it’s a safe bet that one or multiple of those outfielders would have to go to Miami — being able to insert Stanton’s bat into the lineup obviously would mean making him the starting right fielder. That would likely mean Jason Heyward moving to center, a move that’s been suggested plenty this offseason independent of any Stanton news.

Cubs fans and observers have been laser-focused on the Shohei Ohtani sweepstakes — of which the North Siders are one of seven finalists for the Japanese superstar who can pitch and hit — but this new information throws a brand-new wrench into the offseason: the prospect of one of baseball’s biggest bats wanting to call Wrigley Field home.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Ben Zobrist ready for robot umps?

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USA TODAY

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Ben Zobrist ready for robot umps?

Nick Friedell, Jordan Bernfield and Jay Cohen join Chuck Garfien on the panel.  Jose Quintana gets rocked early by the Brewers while Yu Darvish throws a successful sim game. Meanwhile, Ben Zobrist makes a pitch for robot umps… right in the home plate umpire’s face.

Plus Roquan Smith is finally at Bears practice.  Will his 29-day holdout put more pressure on the first round pick?  

Listen to the full podcast here or via the embedded player below: 

Quintana's script against Brewers flipped

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USA TODAY

Quintana's script against Brewers flipped

Before this afternoon's game against the Brewers, Jose Quintana had a 0.95 ERA against them, but thanks to some first-inning longballs, that changed quickly. Milwaukee, on their way to a 7-0 win at Wrigley Field, had sort of stumbled in to this two game series thanks to shaky bullpen performances against the Padres and Braves in their previous two series, and given Quintana's past success against them, it didn't appear likely going into the game that things would change.
 
It took all of two pitches for Lorenzo Cain to homer to left, and then later in the first inning, for Ryan Braun to do the same with a two-run shot that gave the Brewers a quick 3-0 lead. Braun, who before today's game was hitting .143 without even an extra base hit against Quintana, ultimately homered twice.
 
"Everything he’s thrown me, he’s had success with," Braun said of Quintana. "Everything he’s shown me had worked for him."
 
As a team, the Brewers were hitting just .202 against Quintana, so they knew scoring opportunities would be at a premium.
 
"A guy as good as him isn’t going to make many mistakes, so any mistakes he does make you have to take advantage of," Braun said. "He’s had so much success against us, the odds were we were going to find a way to score a couple runs, we were able to do that against him today."
 
In the first inning, Cain homered in the first on a fastball left too far in the zone, and Braun on a curveball that didn't break away from the sweet spot. Braun's second homer came on a 75 mph curveball after Quintana fell behind in the count 2-0.
 
Brewers starter Jhoulys Chacin said that going into the game, he was thinking about how much his offense has struggled against Quintana, but seeing them score so early eased the pressure on him and allowed him to work with his slider and fastball a little more aggressively.
 
"A couple of big-time players stepped up in the first inning, and I mean, yea, we've really struggled against this guy," Brewers manager Craig Counsell said of the first-inning success against Quintana. "You put up three runs in the first inning with two homers, it flips the script pretty fast."
 
With the onus off of Chacin, he was better able to throw seven scoreless innings on the way to his sixth decision in his last seven starts. Today's was an especially important win for Milwaukee, who entered this week's short series three games behind the Cubs. Brewers players differed on whether or not they'd call it a must-win, however.
 
"We have six more after these against the Cubs, but I feel like any game is must-win right now," Chacin said.
 
Braun, who has seen firsthand how much games in August and September can change the course of what had been a successful season, called it a little differently.
 
"It’s pretty close to a must-win. If we want to stay in the division race, I think we had to win one of two, ideally you gotta win both," Braun said. "These guys are really good, you obviously didn’t want to leave here down five games."
 
Against the packed crowd of 40,441 Tuesday, Braun said that he enjoys the atmosphere at Wrigley as the opponent.
 
"I’ve always enjoyed playing here. As a competitor, there’s no more enjoyable atmosphere to play in than this. The more hostile the environment is, the more enjoyable it is as a competitor. This place is always packed, it’s always loud. It’s a very challenging place to win," Braun said.
 
Even with another win tomorrow, the Brewers will still remain a game behind the Cubs, but Braun said that he is thankful to be playing in meaningful games at this point in the season regardless. After tomorrow, the Cubs and Brewers play two series in the first half at September, one at Miller Park and one at Wrigley Field.