Bears

Cutler vs. Vikings? Still not cleared; Thursday practice looms as key indicator

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Cutler vs. Vikings? Still not cleared; Thursday practice looms as key indicator

Offensive coordinator Mike Tice didnt mean it the way it came out but he was perhaps speaking for much of BearNation on Wednesday in the matter of whether quarterback Jay Cutler would be back from his concussion and able to play Sunday against the Minnesota Vikings.

God, I hope so, I do, I really do, Tice said, then quickly added, nothing against Jason Campbell. Jason did a remarkable job based on the opportunities he was afforded. But it would be great to get our guy back.

Whether the Bears do formally get their Cutler guy back will have to wait pending the outcomes of tests and his condition after the Bears first practice of the week on Thursday. Coach Lovie Smith told Campbell last Tuesday that he was starting against the San Francisco 49ers whether Cutler passed any of the tests or protocols associated with concussions.

Cutler said on Wednesday that he was not having any concussion symptoms. But as far as a definitive on whether he would play?

I dont know, he said. Well see.

Cutler and rookie defensive end Shea McClellin, also out of the 49ers game with lingering concussion issues, have been cleared to practice only on a limited basis, coach Lovie Smith said. They need to be cleared by an independent neurologist before they are available to play in a game.

Despite missing last Sundays game and one in 2010 from a concussion, Cutler was firmly against establishing a mandatory one-game moratorium on playing after a concussion.

No. No. Not at all, Cutler said. Every persons different, every hits different. I dont think you can give a blanket protocol of a week off. I think its not fair to the players.

Getting engaged and having a child has altered some of his perspectives but not all.

I think everyones perspectives change because theres just more awareness, more out there, more information, Cutler said. Its not going to change the way I play football, my desire to return to the field by any means.

Why Mitch Trubisky's biggest weakness won't preclude him from success in 2018

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USA Today Sports Images

Why Mitch Trubisky's biggest weakness won't preclude him from success in 2018

As the Bears set their foundation for training camp during OTAs this month, one part of that is beginning to identify each player’s strengths and weaknesses on which to build in Bourbonnais. 

Designing an offense to Mitch Trubisky’s strengths was one of the reasons why Ryan Pace hired Matt Nagy, who then hired Mark Helfrich to be his offensive coordinator. Easy is the wrong word — but it wouldn’t have made sense for the Bears to not build an offense around their second-picked quarterback. 

But as Nagy and Helfrich are installing that offense during OTAs and, next month, veteran minicamp, they’re also learning what Trubisky’s weaknesses are. And the one Helfrich pointed to, in a way, is a positive. 

“Experience,” Helfrich said. “I think it’s 100 percent experience and just reps, and that’s kind of what I was talking about was knowing why something happened. As a quarterback, he might take the perfect drop and be looking at the right guy in your progression, and that guy runs the wrong route or the left guard busts or something. The defense does something different or wrong, even. And trusting that is just a matter of putting rep on top of rep on top of rep and being confident.”

It'd be a concern if the Bears thought Trubisky lacked the necessary talent to be great, or had a lacking work ethic or bad attitude. Experience isn't something he can control, in a way. 

This isn’t anything new for Trubisky. His lack of experience at North Carolina — he only started 13 games there — was the biggest ding to his draft stock a year ago; while he started a dozen games for the Bears in 2017, the offense was simple and conservative, designed to minimize risk for Trubisky (and, to be fair, a sub-optimal group of weapons around him). 

But even if Trubisky started all 16 games in an innovative, aggressive offense last year, he’d still be experiencing plenty of things for the first time. Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger made this point back in September that still resonates now with regard to Trubisky:

“I think it takes a few years until you can really get that title of understanding being great or even good, because you see so many looks,” Roethlisberger said. “In Year 2 and 3, you’re still seeing looks and can act like a rookie.”

So the challenge for Nagy and Helfrich is to build an offense that accentuates Trubisky’s strengths while managing his lack of experience. For what it’s worth, the Los Angeles Rams and Philadelphia Eagles succeeded in those efforts last year with Jared Goff and Carson Wentz, respectively. 

For Helfrich, though, one of Trubisky’s strengths — his leadership qualities — are already helping mitigate his need for more experience. 

“He’s still in the mode of learning and doing things out here,” Helfrich said. “We might have run one play 10 times against 10 different defenses, you know? And so his response to every one of those 10 things is brand new. And so, you see his reaction to some of those is good. Some of those things you want to improve upon and then keep your chest up and lead because we need that.”
 

Charlie Tilson plays in Detroit for first time since getting injured in his MLB debut

Charlie Tilson plays in Detroit for first time since getting injured in his MLB debut

For over two years, Charlie Tilson was starting to look like his own version of "Moonlight" Graham, the player made famous in the movie "Field of Dreams" because he played in one major league game and never got to bat.

The White Sox traded for Tilson just before the trade deadline passed in 2016. Two days later he made his big league debut with the White Sox in Detroit. He got a single in his first at-bat, but left the game with an injury and missed the rest of the season. Tilson also missed all of the 2017 season and his MLB future was starting to come into question.

Back healthy, Tilson started this season in Triple-A Charlotte and hit .248 in 39 games when he got called up to replace Leury Garcia, who was placed on the disabled list. On Thursday, Tilson returned to a big league field for the first time in more than 20 months. He went 0-for-3 in a loss to Baltimore.

Friday marked a return to the site of Tilson's big league debut and the injury that made it such a brief stint. Tilson has now played three big league games, over the course of nearly 21 months, and two of them have been in Detroit.

Tilson went 1-for-4, meaning both his hits are in Comerica Park. The White Sox lost 5-4 after giving up three runs in the bottom of the eighth.