White Sox

Despite different backgrounds, Teague, Allen have similar experiences

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Despite different backgrounds, Teague, Allen have similar experiences

Besides each having an older brother also in the NBA, the Bulls' two rookies don't have much in common. Except, of course, the usual rookie struggles.

Marquis Teague is 19 years old, a first-round pick with a guaranteed contract after an amateur career that included winning a national championship in his lone college season at the University of Kentucky. Following his high school days, in which he was ranked as one of the nation's top players early on, he was destined to play on basketball's highest level and was considered to be an even better prospect than his brother Jeff, the starting point guard for the Atlanta Hawks.

Chicago native Ryan Allen is 24 years old, an undrafted rookie from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, a mid-major program. The journey of his brother Tony, the starting shooting guard for the Memphis Grizzlies, has been well-documented over the years--an afterthought on Chicago's prep scene until his senior year at Crane High School on the West Side, he attended two junior colleges before leading Oklahoma State to the Final Four alongside former Bulls guard John Lucas III--but the younger Allen's saga of playing at two high schools, a post-graduate prep school and two junior colleges gives him a leg up in terms of mileage.

What Teague and Allen do share is, though they've struggled to get playing time in actual games this preseason--Allen has appeared in one contest, matching up with his brother when the Grizzlies were in town; Teague, who the organization is obviously more invested in, has played 25 minutes in five games--is a willingness to learn.

"I've learned a lot about the game. Just getting coached by Thibs, a future Hall of Famer, it's amazing. Being teammates with Booz, Rip, Luol, players that have played in the league for 10-plus years. Just being around those guys, you get a feel for what you need to do to excel at this level. My brother's been around, Derrick's been around, so really just showing me what hard work can get you and being consistent with that," Allen, a defensive specialist, told CSNChicago.com. "I'm just learning a lot. I'm just learning all the plays, seeing mistakes that other guys make, building off those things and just being ready. My brother, he sat on the bench for a few years in Boston cheering and he finally got his chance, and he made it happen, so I've seen it all. I've pretty much prepared myself for everything. I'm just ready. This is a process."

By no means is Allen a loudmouth, but compared to Teague, he's Nate Robinson when it comes to talking, at least to the media. Still, he shared similar sentiments.

"I think it's been pretty good. I'm still trying to learn more. Just trying to take it all in and use it as a learning experience," Teague told CSNChicago.com. "Just different teams, playing for a different coach, trying to figure out what he wants you to do and things like that. So, it's just starting to adjust and figure out how to put your game in the system."

Teague was billed as a speedster and on certain plays, his explosiveness is evident, but more often than not, he appears to be over-thinking on the court, playing not to mistakes. In that regard, he's gotten advice from fellow point guards Kirk Hinrich and Nate Robinson, as well as the sidelined Derrick Rose.

"I'm just kind of holding back. Pretty much not being aggressive," admitted Teague, who played with five other NBA draft picks last season. "I've talked to Rose. He just told me to shoot the ball. He said, 'You've got to shoot.' The way our offense is, the point guard has to shoot the ball. He was just telling me to be aggressive."

In Allen's case, he's already outlasted most of his fellow non-guaranteed training-camp invitees, some of whom--the recently-waived Kyrylo Fesenko and swingman Andre Emmett--have prior NBA experience. His odds to make the Bulls' regular-season roster remain long, but he's endeared himself to both teammates and coaches with his work ethic and demeanor, which isn't surprising since his humility is eerily reminiscent of Rose, his childhood friend.

Privately, sources believe that he could be the proverbial basketball journeyman, perhaps starting out in the D-League or overseas and polishing his raw offensive game before making it in the NBA, similar to players Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau has coached in the past, such as former Knicks star John Starks. Allen's stated of objectives of being able to "defend, go out and play hard, bring a lot of energy and hit open shots," as well as his selflessness, could go a long way in his professional future.

"Same as Day 1, really not even thinking about it. Just one day at a time. My main thing right now is just helping the team in any way that I can. My goal is to make the team better. It's not only just to make the team, but to make the team better, as well. That's just what it is because I've been a fan before I was here and I'm always going to be a fan, and support the team 100 percent. So whatever happens, happens. But I'm just here to help the team and get better every day," explained Allen, grew up in walking distance of the United Center. "Defense comes easy to me. I can play offense, as well, but I'm so good defensively, my offense is kind of overlooked. I can score the ball if that's what needed for me to do. I can do it, but defense is where I'm going to hang my hat and I'm going to get things done to help this team."

For Teague, his progress is under far more scrutiny, not only by coaches, but Bulls fans, who note his pedigree--like Rose, he was coached by John Calipari and experienced team success, so with the former league MVP currently on the shelf, it would seem to some observers that he should be an immediate contributor--and recall the fact that the last time the Bulls drafted a point guard with only a year of college basketball under his belt, he won the Rookie of the Year award. But the Indianapolis native, who says coaches have singled out his weak-side defense as needing room for improvement, has put it all in perspective, particularly with his former college teammates, including No. 1 overall pick and Chicagoan Anthony Davis, all citing the typical first-year ups and downs when they commiserate.

"Everybody's been saying that they're trying to figure it out, too. It's been up and down. People have been playing good, some people have been struggling. Everybody's just saying they're trying to figure it out. We're all in the same stage really," said Teague, whose brother also struggled as a rookie before earning more minutes in his second season. "I'm playing with some of the best players in the NBA that know how to win, know how to play playoff basketball, so I feel like this is the best situation for me to get better."

Jose Abreu is an All-Star starter and Silver Slugger, but will he be with the White Sox past 2019?

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USA TODAY

Jose Abreu is an All-Star starter and Silver Slugger, but will he be with the White Sox past 2019?

It was Jose Abreu's worst season in the major leagues. And he still started the All-Star Game and won a Silver Slugger.

The White Sox have a decision to make at some point, though not necessarily this offseason, on what to do with Abreu in the long term. His on-field production isn't a question. His role as an off-field mentor isn't a question. But when Opening Day 2020 rolls around, he'll be 33 years old. Does that "align" — to borrow a word used very often by Rick Hahn at last week's GM Meetings — with the White Sox long-term plans?

Abreu's entering the final season of his current contract coming off a year defined as much by freak injuries and a prolonged slump as by the accolades he received in spite of those things. For the first time as a big leaguer, he finished a season without hitting at least 25 homers and racking up at least 100 RBIs. Only playing in 128 games, he posted career lows in most stat categories, with his 36 doubles, the second most in his career, a notable exception. His .473 slugging percentage was only the second lowest of his five-year major league career.

But if the awards were any indication — though it should be added there was a dearth of productive first basemen in the American League last season — he still has the ability to be one of the game's best at his position. His 162-game average over the course of the past five seasons: a .295/.353/.516 slash line with 32 home runs and 107 RBIs. Three times in five seasons, Abreu has received MVP votes, finishing as high as fourth during his Rookie of the Year season in 2014.

And on top of all those numbers, Abreu has earned consistent praise for his role off the field. He's been an omnipresent mentor to Yoan Moncada, who's not even two years removed from being the No. 1 prospect in baseball, with the two Cubans' lockers right next to each other in the White Sox clubhouse. And Abreu is touted as an example to all the team's young players, who can look to him as a model for how to go about one's business and prepare on a daily basis.

So the value is obvious. But in order to make a decision on Abreu, the White Sox have to figure out when their planned contention window is going to open. Significant injuries to a host of their highly touted prospects — most notably the elbow injury that forced Michael Kopech into Tommy John surgery — has muddied the waters when it comes to predicting when this wave of minor league talent will was ashore on the South Side.

If that year is soon, if it's still 2020, then having a 33-year-old Abreu in the middle of the order doesn't seem like a bad thing at all. But in order to make that happen, the White Sox will need to give him a contract extension at some point before this time next year, or they'll have to give him a new contract if he were to reach the free-agent market. If the year when the contention window opens is much past 2020, how old is too old to help the White Sox make a championship run? When does the dropoff in production that comes with most aging players arrive?

The White Sox talk highly of Abreu, giving no indication they plan to move on from the guy they spent lavishly on after the 2013 season. And for his part, Abreu continues to talk glowingly about the White Sox and remains committed to saying that he hopes to be in Chicago for the foreseeable future.

"Everybody knows that 2019 is going to be the last season of my current contract, but I try not to think about that because I am part of the White Sox and I believe that I’m going to be part of this organization for a very long time," he said through a translator during a Tuesday conference call with reporters. "That’s something that’s out of my hands right now because I have one season left on this current contract.

"But in case the next season is my last one, I’d like to thank all the White Sox organization and all the people who have been around me during my time on this team, especially the owner, Jerry (Reinsdorf). He has been an outstanding person to me. He’s one of the greatest people that I’ve met in this country.

"But I try not to think about that because I truly believe that I’m going to be part of this organization for a very long time. But we’ll see. I know that this is a business, and that’s the way you have to approach it."

That answer to a reporter's question covered all the bases, a masterclass in the public-relations friendly response. But Abreu does always come off as someone who wants to stick with this team. He knows what's going on in the minor league system and he knows how bright the White Sox future is.

And the White Sox know what Abreu can do. Their reported desire to trade Avisail Garcia might be an indication they're ready to move on from their older players, but Garcia and Abreu are vastly different cases, with Abreu far more productive on the field and more commonly discussed as an asset to the young players off it.

During the 2017 season, the decision on Abreu seemed an easy one for the White Sox: Keep this extraordinarily productive player and team leader around as long as you can. But injuries might have made that decision more difficult — and not the freak ones Abreu suffered during the season, but the ones suffered by prospects that might have changed the timeline of this whole thing, and therefore the "alignment" of Abreu and this team's bright future.

Cody Parkey will kick at Soldier Field Wednesday night

Cody Parkey will kick at Soldier Field Wednesday night

Cody Parkey downplayed the significance of going to practice kicking at Soldier Field Wednesday night, saying he’s heading there to “check all my boxes” and that “it can’t hurt.”

But Parkey’s trip from Halas Hall to the lakefront is noteworthy in the aftermath of the Bears’ kicker missing four PAT/field goal attempts, all of which went off an upright, in Sunday’s 34-22 win over the Detroit Lions. It’ll result in a long day for Parkey, who estimated he’d get back to Halas Hall around 11 p.m. Wednesday night. 

“As a kicker, this is my fifth season doing this, I’ve had highs, I’ve had lows,” Parkey said. “So unfortunately it comes with the territory sometimes. I don’t get down on myself, I know I’m a great kicker. I’m just gonna go out there Sunday and try my best.”

Parkey hasn’t got caught up in the reaction to his historically-bad game, staying off social media and saying he couldn’t care less about ignominiously making a Jimmy Fallon monologue this week. 

“I go home to my wife and my dog, and they don’t really care if I make field goals or not,” Parkey said. “So I find peace in that. I talk to my family, stuff like that. But I don’t beat myself up, I don’t go on social media, I don’t do any of that. I could care less about what anyone thinks of me other than people in this locker room.”

Logistically, getting to Soldier Field from Halas Hall can be an traffic-fueled annoyance, but it’s one the Bears felt was important enough to go ahead and do. Former Bears kickers Robbie Gould and Kevin Butler used to practice kicking at Soldier Field during the week, for what it’s worth. 

The Bears will need Parkey to be better on Sunday night against the Minnesota Vikings, in what could be a close, critical game for control of the NFC North. But Parkey won’t change his mental approach for that night, even if his midweek work is now switched up a bit. 

“Same as last week, same as the week before,” Parkey said. “I just try to go out there and make my kicks.”