Bulls

Do-or-die deadline for the NBA?

553968.jpg

Do-or-die deadline for the NBA?

From Comcast SportsNet
NEW YORK (AP) -- NBA owners, losing hundreds of millions of dollars a year, wanted an overhaul of the financial system to ensure themselves a chance to profit. Players, believing they were the driving force behind record TV ratings and revenues, wanted to keep what they felt they deserved. Now, negotiations that have lasted nearly two years need to end in the next few days. Commissioner David Stern said he will cancel the first two weeks of the regular season if there is no agreement on a new deal by Monday, costing both sides money and driving away some basketball fans who might never come back. "There is an extraordinary hit coming to the owners and to the players," Stern said. Not to mention the people who work in the game and the businesses that depend on it. Stern has repeatedly said owners had two goals in the talks: a way to escape losses and a system where all teams could compete equally, noting that the NBA's small-market clubs aren't nearly as successful as Super Bowl champions like Indianapolis and Green Bay. The problem, they said, was a system that guarantees players 57 percent of all basketball-related income, which includes gate receipts, broadcast revenue, in-arena sales of novelties and concessions, arena signage revenue, game parking and sponsorship dollars. Another problem is a salary cap structure that allows teams to go well beyond it if they were willing to pay a luxury tax, which the big spenders in big markets such as Los Angeles and New York could easily afford. The sides are still divided over the revenue split and the cap, and players insist they would rather sit out games than take a deal that would eliminate gains they fought for years ago. "They're going to sacrifice -- if they lose games, they miss money and all that. They feel they have to take a stand the same way players took a stand for them before they were here. It's actually quite inspiring to listen to them articulate that," said players' attorney Jeffrey Kessler, who also represented NFL players during their four-month lockout this summer. "I think they saw how the NFL players stood together through tough times and ended up with a deal the NFL players thought was fair. They're thinking they're going to do the same thing." The cost, for both sides, would be staggering. Stern predicted a 200 million loss just for the cancellation of the NBA's entire preseason schedule. If arenas are dark on Nov. 1, when the real games are supposed to start, the damage will be even greater. "They're in the hundreds of millions of dollars," Deputy Commissioner Adam Silver said. "We're not prepared to share the specifics. But, yes, we've spent a lot of time with our teams walking through those scenarios of lost games, and the damage is enormous, will be enormous." Players' association executive director Billy Hunter said players would lose 350 million for each month they're locked out. The hardest hits likely will be felt by those off the court -- from the 114 people the NBA laid off in July to businesses that depend on fans flocking to the games. From the parking lot of his Crown Burgers restaurant in downtown Salt Lake City, Mike Katsanevas can see the edge of EnergySolutions Arena, its blue-and-green lights already twinkling at dusk. What he may not see at all this year are the hundreds of fans who routinely pack his 224-seat restaurant before each Utah Jazz game, parking their cars for free if they order 14 in food, including his famous made-to-order patties crowned with pastrami. "For us, it's a tremendous impact if these games don't go through," said Katsanevas, whose family owns the restaurant just a block north of the arena and five others in the metro area. "Before it used to be our gravy. But now with the economy and everything else that's going on, it's become a necessity." He said all of his 41 employees will see their hours cut if the lockout continues. Players and owners did narrow the financial gap before talks broke down Tuesday. Players proposed lowering their BRI guarantee to 53 percent and owners increased their formal offer to 47 percent. Stern also said he discussed the idea of a 50-50 split, which was rejected by players. With each percentage point equivalent to roughly 38 million of last year's BRI total of 3.8 billion, the union believes a reduction from 57 percent to 53 percent is enough of a concession, saying it would transfer more than 1 billion to owners in six years. So while sharing 50-50 sounds great in kindergarten, it may not work for NBA players. Stern said the league had backed off other demands, like salary rollbacks and non-guaranteed contracts, while offering players a chance to opt out of the agreement after seven years. So there is hope of a compromise in the coming days. Both sides insist they are committed to making a deal, although Silver confirmed last season that some money-losing teams would be better off if there were no season. Fans wonder how the NBA could be on the brink of self-destruction over a few measly percentage points when its popularity has soared. The historic free agency period of 2010, which put LeBron James in Miami alongside Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh, brought a new level of interest that carried right through the Dallas Mavericks' victory over the Heat in the NBA finals. But in announcing the lockout on June 30, Stern noted that small-market owners didn't particularly enjoy the season or feel included in it, and many have little incentive to go back to a system that looks like the old one. Nor would players want to play under a system that restricts free agency or limits their earning potential. Hunter and union president Derek Fisher of the Lakers have said they are prepared to sit rather than accept a bad deal. That could be the outcome, as damaging as it seems, without a big change in a short amount of time. "I haven't talked to all 400-plus guys, but the guys that I have talked to are all on the same page. While it would be devastating for fans and everything like that, right now we're dealing with some serious business," Detroit's Ben Gordon said. "One thing Derek said is we have to stand for something. It's not only today we're playing for -- it's also tomorrow, for the guys who aren't in the league yet."

Making of a Chicago legend: A look back at Jabari Parker's decorated Simeon career

jabariparker.png
AP

Making of a Chicago legend: A look back at Jabari Parker's decorated Simeon career

From the moment Jabari Parker started his local basketball career, he's been a special talent who has produced at every level. Parker's signing with the Chicago Bulls this offseason brings back a lot of memories of his decorated four-year high school career at Simeon.

For Bulls fans who didn't follow Parker before Duke or the NBA, here's some of the notable moments from four years in the Public League.

As a freshman with the Wolverines, Parker was seen as one of three big incoming freshman in the area for the Class of 2013, along with forward Alex Foster and center Tommy Hamilton. Although all three players had the size and skill level to be varsity contributors, it was Parker who was special from his debut game.

Coming off the bench for a top-5 Simeon team against a top-10 Thornton team at Chicago State, Parker had 16 points on 6-for-9 shooting with two 3-pointers as the Wolverines went on to win in his first game in high school. Eventually becoming the first Wolverine freshman to start on varsity, Parker piled up high-major scholarship offers and national acclaim, as he was the team's second-leading scorer behind Brandon Spearman.

But Parker was hurt on the eve of the IHSA Class 4A state championship weekend and was on the bench injured as Simeon went on to surprisingly win the state title after some late-season slip-ups. Parker contributed heavily to Simeon winning the state title during his first season, however, as he was leading scorer in six games during that season.

During his sophomore season, Parker blossomed from a prospect into a full-blown star as Simeon once again captured a state title. By this point in his career, Parker was a consensus top-5 national high school prospect in his class as he regularly led a loaded Simeon team in scoring. Parker eventually averaged 15.3 points and 5.9 rebounds per game as he won ESPN High School 2011 Sophomore of the Year national honors, while also Simeon won a title at the prestigious Pontiac Holiday Tournament.

The summer of 2011 saw Parker become a contender for No. 1 in his class -- and regardless of class at the high school level -- as he dominated the summer circuit against his peers and older players.

Making the 2011 USA Basketball U16 team, Parker won MVP honors at the FIBA Americas U16 Tournament as the USA team captured a gold medal. Parker also had big performances at the Kevin Durant and LeBron James Skill Academies before winning the MVP at the Nike Global Challenge in August against mostly older players.

Before entering his junior season at Simeon, some national scouts believed Parker was the best prospect in either the junior or senior national classes. With Parker garnering so many accomplishments as an underclassman, he had a huge reputation already as Simeon was an established national powerhouse.

Parker helped the Wolverines capture a third straight state title, a city title and another title at the Pontiac Holiday Tournament, as they went 33-1. Simeon didn't lose to an Illinois opponent Parker's junior year (they only lost to nationally ranked Findlay Prep) with Parker setting a school record of 40 points in only 21 minutes against Perspectives on Dec. 19. For his junior season, Parker put up 19.5 points, 8.9 rebounds per game as he became the first non-senior to win Mr. Basketball in Illinois honors.

Gatorade also declared Parker the national boys basketball Player of the Year for that high school season as he became only the fourth non-senior to win that award. Sports Illustrated put Parker on its cover and proclaimed him as the best high school basketball player since LeBron James.

Facing an enormous amount of pressure during his senior year, Simeon played a national schedule and went 30-3, winning a fourth consecutive IHSA state title with Parker as he put up 18.4 points, 10.4 rebounds and 2.7 assists per game.

Becoming the only player besides Sergio McClain to start on four straight IHSA state title teams, Parker secured back-to-back Mr. Basketball in Illinois honors while also making the McDonald's All-American Game, Jordan Brand Classic and the Nike Hoop Summit. Parker played all over the country during his senior season, with nationally-televised games and packed crowds filled with fans.

Reclassifications and the emergence of other contenders, coupled with Parker's foot injury before his senior season, dropped Parker below the No. 1 ranking to end his high school career. But he still finished as a consensus top-5 prospect in the class who eventually rose to the No. 2 pick in the NBA Draft in 2014.

Now that Parker has signed with the Bulls, he has a chance to resurrect his career in Chicago, the place where he had his most basketball success.

12 takeaways from Blackhawks prospect camp: Evaluating Adam Boqvist and Henri Jokiharju

adam_boqvist_usa_today.jpg
USA TODAY

12 takeaways from Blackhawks prospect camp: Evaluating Adam Boqvist and Henri Jokiharju

There was some added excitement around Blackhawks development camp this year.

Fans were able to get their first look at 2018 first-round selections Adam Boqvist and Nicolas Beaudin in Blackhawks sweaters. They were able to check out Henri Jokiharju, evaluate how he's progressed since last year and get a mini glimpse on whether there's a possibility he could make the big club in October. And they got a chance to pick out some prospects who may be breakout candidates and could make an impact with the NHL in the next couple years.

It's important not to put too much stock into anything because the real evaluation will begin at training camp in September, but it was a good time to make a strong first impression.

Here are 12 takeaways from the week:

1. So, how did Jokiharju look?

All eyes were on No. 28 this week. He's the X-factor on the blue line if the Blackhawks go into the season with this group.

If Jokiharju can make the team straight out of camp, they're not expecting him to be just another guy. They want him to step in and be a difference-maker.

Offensively, the talent is clearly there. That's what made him a first-round pick. Defensively is what his biggest challenge will be when breaking into the NHL, and fortunately for the Blackhawks that's the part of his game he tried to strengthen in Portland.

"He’s an impressive all-around player," Blackhawks general manager Stan Bowman said. "The one thing he did last year — offensively he had a great season. But he learned how to be a two-way defenseman. The biggest jump for him is going to be, can you defend? I think his offensive skills are elite and I was really impressed when I saw him the first time. He trained hard. He looks like an NHL-type body now. A year ago, he’s always been a fit kid but he really worked hard on that.

"I was impressed with how he came into camp in great condition and you can tell he’s trained hard. Physically, that’s the one thing that’s the challenge you’re going up against the biggest and strongest kids. He took some strides there. It’s going to be, how does he do in training camp on the defensive side?"

Here are a few clips from Jokiharju's camp:

2. Thoughts on Boqvist

He may have been the youngest skater at camp, but Boqvist certainly didn't act or play like it. You can see the potential he has to be a great player in the NHL one day, which will probably be sooner than later for the Blackhawks.

Rockford head coach Jeremy Colliton ran several drills over the course of the week and coached one of the teams during Friday's scrimmage. When asked what he thought about Boqvist, he chuckled because there weren't enough words to describe his ability.

"He's a pretty good player," Colliton said. "You don't want to evaluate too much based on a summer camp, but it's always fun to see them in a game situation and he's one of those guys that can raise his level. You can see the competitiveness. Fun to watch."

There was a mini scare when he took a low hit from Jokiharju, but he eventually shook it off and said after the game: "I feel good."

Here are a few clips from Boqvist's camp:

3. Nicolas Beaudin flying under the radar

It seems like Beaudin isn't gaining as much attention because the focus has been on Boqvist and Jokiharju, but he had a strong camp. During the scrimmage on Friday he broke up a 2-on-1 in the final minute of a 2-2 game, which turned out to be a game-saver considering his team went on to win in a shootout.

Not that the end result mattered here, but it does in the NHL and those are the kinds of plays that coaches notice.

"He’s probably similar to where Henri was a year ago," Bowman said. "He has really good instincts in terms of how to defend and compliment with offense. Really polished, smooth player, he makes it look pretty easy. He doesn’t exert a ton of energy, but he’s a very efficient defender. For him it’s going to be like Henri was a year ago. This is a big year for him to take the next step in terms of his physical development."

Here are a few clips from Beaudin's camp:

4. Skill is evident in Ian Mitchell

If there's one thing that has been noticeable about Mitchell's game, it's that he's got an NHL-type shot. He's not very big, but boy can he snipe it. There were several different occasions where he went bar down, including during a mini 3-on-3 scrimmage on Wednesday:

He also showed some physicality when he laid a nice hip check during Friday's scrimmage:

The Blackhawks think highly of Mitchell, who was drafted in the second round (57th overall) in 2017. They talk about him like he's a first-rounder. That's how skilled he is and how much they believe he could be part of the long-term plans.

It showed in his freshman season at Denver, where he compiled 30 points (two goals, 28 assists) in 41 games. If he takes another big step forward in his development as a sophomore, there's a decent chance he could sign an entry-level deal with the Blackhawks by next spring.

"Every NHL team has a lot of good defensemen prospects, so I mean obviously when you want to go out there you want to showcase yourself as best as you can," Mitchell said. "Obviously you want to be the best defenseman here so that's my goal going into this. I want to prove that I'm a good defenseman, I deserve to play at the next level. There's lots of good players here, but you're trying to all succeed."

Here are a few clips from Mitchell's camp:

5. Colliton's influence on Jacob Nilsson

Prospect camp is usually a time where the Blackhawks can get an up-close look at who they have in the pipeline and who can contribute in years to come.

The one interesting name on this year's roster sheet is Nilsson, who signed a one-year deal out of Sweden this summer and will turn 25 by the time the 2018-19 season rolls around. He didn't make his way to North America to play in the American Hockey League. He's clearly determined to reach the NHL and he felt like the Blackhawks were the right team to help him get there, in large part because of Colliton's influence on his game.

"I got a pretty clear idea of how they wanted to work with the people and develop the players and stuff like that," Nilsson said. "I had Jeremy as a coach a few years back in Sweden, so that was a big point in why I chose Chicago. I think he helped me a lot with some things I had to do better on the ice and then after that we had a really good connection."

It wouldn't be surprising to see Nilsson as one of the first call-ups for the Blackhawks this season if he doesn't start with the team right away. He can play in several different situations, is strong on the puck, has high compete level and is simply more polished and further along in his development curve.

"Very skilled," Colliton said of Nilsson. "Skilled guys are going to want to play with him because he sees the ice very well, he can beat a guy 1-on-1, but he's also a competitive guy. He likes to battle. It takes some time for him to grow into an offensive role, I think he can play a checking role, too. He's got a couple different ways that he can play in the NHL eventually."

Here are a few clips from Nilsson's camp:

6. Get to know Evan Barratt

The Blackhawks have traded away Ryan Hartman and Andrew Shaw over the last few years, two skilled players who also add sandpaper to the lineup. Barratt is probably right up that alley. Skilled player that plays a gritty style.

You may remember him from this viral video, where he had some fun with Minnesota Gophers defenseman Ryan Lindgren in the penalty box:

After exiting the box, Barratt laid a big hit on Lindgren and then scored a goal top shelf. That's who he is, and somebody that would look good in a Blackhawks uniform.

"Definitely my strength," Barratt said when asked where he took his biggest stride last season as a freshman at Penn State. "I put in a lot of work this summer. I really feel like I've improved a lot, transferring it to skating and my strength on my stick and all that, but I definitely my strength has really helped me a lot."

Here are a few clips from Barratt's camp:

7. Checking in on the goalies: Alexis Gravel and Wouter Peeters

It must be challenging to be a young goalie at a prospect camp, where you're surrounded by skaters who are thinking about breaking into the NHL in the next couple years and you know it's not exactly realistic the same can happen for you. It takes time for goalies to develop and there are only 31 starting jobs available. Just ask Jeff Glass how difficult it can be to work your way there.

Gravel, 18, and Peeters, 19, were the only two Blackhawks netminders at camp under contract with the team and they likely still have a long way to go before they have a chance to make an impact at the NHL level. But there were some flashes this week, particularly by Gravel during 3-on-3 where he denied a pair of breakaways in the same shift:

8. Where does Blake Hillman fit into the plans?

Of the 41 players that attended prospect camp, Hillman was the only one that had any sort of NHL experience. He burned the first year of his two-year entry-level deal by playing in four games last season, scoring a goal and averaging 18:02 of ice time per game with the Blackhawks.

That gives him a leg up on the rest of the field, but that doesn't mean a roster spot will be given to him. He's also set to become a restricted free agent after this coming season, which adds some extra motivation.

"I wouldn't have left college if I didn't think this was the right time for me to step in and have my best opportunity to make an impact," Hillman said. "Obviously, you try to set yourself up with the best opportunity so I thought this was going to be the best opportunity."

That being said, there's still a fair chance he'll start the year in Rockford considering there are many other defensemen battling for the same spot. Would he view that as a disappointment?

"No, not at all," Hillman said. "Obviously, I'm shooting for the stars, shooting for opening roster but it doesn't always go your way and gotta work hard to get where the big guys are."

Here are a few clips from Hillman's camp:

9. What will happen with Chad Krys?

It's no secret the Blackhawks have a surplus of defensemen in the pipeline. Krys, who was drafted in the second round (No. 45 overall) in 2016, is one of those guys who has probably been pushed down the chart as the Blackhawks continue to select high-end blue liners, but he shouldn't be an afterthought.

Krys increased his point total by 16 from his freshman to sophomore season at Boston University, and did so in three fewer games. It's possible he signs an entry-level contract after his junior campaign to get himself into the system. But that's not his focus right now.

"I mean, look if I could play in the NHL right now I'd love to," Krys said. "But for me I think it's important that I'm taking the right steps. I want to make that jump when I feel like I'm going to be able to play in the NHL. My two years at BU has really benefitted me. Going back there and playing a lot and take it year by year. There's a lot of defensemen in this organization and we'll see what happens. I want to keep getting better, but for right now I'm just kind of focused on this year, and we'll decide what's going on after this."

Here are a few clips from Krys' camp:

10. Jake Wise loves hockey ... and is good at it

Speaking of Krys, he and Wise were roommates this week because they'll be teammates at Boston next year. A nice way to formulate some bonding team before the NCAA season even starts.

Anything stand out about Wise?

"Really, really nice kid," Krys said, then joked. "Loves hockey. Really likes hockey. Sometimes I'm like, 'You've got to stop.'"

But Wise, who was taken in the third round (69th overall) in June, is certainly good at it. He was one of the standouts at camp.

"Yeah, he was," Colliton said. "I didn't know him at all other than he was a draft pick, but very skilled and a smart player. I think he looked really good in the game. He should be happy about his camp."

Here are a few clips from Wise's camp:

11. The Blackhawks get their guy in MacKenzie Entwistle

When the Blackhawks traded Marian Hossa's contract to Arizona in a nine-piece deal, the Coyotes were adamant about including Vinnie Hinostroza in it. Well, the Blackhawks wanted to make sure Entwistle was part of the return if that was the case.

Bowman said that the Blackhawks would have taken him at No. 70 overall in the 2017 draft, but he got selected at 69 by the Coyotes. The Blackhawks ended up taking winger Andrei Altybarmakyan, but now they've got both of the players they were targeting.

"We followed him closely a year ago," Bowman said of Entwistle. "We liked him. ... We got a chance to see him play quite a bit. The attributes that he has are of interest to us would be, first of all, is his size. He's a big kid. He plays multiple positions, predominantly at center. So the fact he can play on the wing when needed.

"We think he's just scratching the surface. He's got to fill out his frame. He's got a big body. He's going to mature over the next couple of years and add some strength. The other part of his game that's appealing is that he's got a lot of good two-way aspects. He's not just one of these young guys who tries to score all the time. He had a pretty good year offensively, but you talk to coaches and they appreciate the way he cares about being on the penalty kill, taking important faceoffs, blocking shots, really supporting his team and not always trying to get the breakaway and score the goal. Sometimes it's hard to convince young players to take pride in that aspect of the game. He seems to have that naturally. I think he's going to be a player that coaches really enjoy having on their team."

Here are a few clips from Entwistle's camp:

12. Alexandre Fortin working his way back

Remember Fortin? On Sept. 25, 2016 he signed as an undrafted free agent and turned out to be the breakout player out of training camp as a 19-year-old. It reached the point where he was considered a possibility to make the Opening Day roster, but instead went to the QMJHL, where he averaged a point per game (22 goals, 30 assists) with the Rouyn-Noranda Huskies.

Last season he made the jump to the AHL, but was plagued by multiple injuries and he could never quite get into a groove. He registered 21 points (four goals, 17 assists) in 53 regular-season games and appeared in only one playoff contest with Rockford.

"Certainly with the training camp he had two years ago and the media narrative, it wasn't what he expected," Colliton said. "But that doesn't mean it wasn't a very successful year for him as far as learning how to be a pro, what it takes to be a pro. And I'm excited to see how he reacts this year. He wasn't healthy all season, he was in and out. And I think it's tough as a first-year guy, 20-year-old, to really make an impact.

"It's not an easy league to play in, the American League. He definitely helped us when he was in, but he didn't play consistently enough health wise, to really grow as maybe he can. So let's hope it happens now. But I really like his mentality."

Here are a few clips from Fortin's camp: