White Sox

Ex-DePaul star joins coaching profession

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Ex-DePaul star joins coaching profession

Every time he sees David Cohn run up and down the court, Tom Kleinschmidt is reminded of the approach he used to take while playing Catholic League basketball...relentless work ethic, gym rat, throwback, old-school, scorer, student of the game, role model, black-and-blue.

Kleinschmidt took Gordon Tech to second place in the Class AA tournament in 1990, earned All-America recognition at DePaul, then had a 12-year professional career with teams in Japan, Italy and Venezuela. After serving as an assistant coach at York High School in Elmhurst for one year, he became head coach this season.

Cohn, a 6-2 junior point guard who has played for three coaches in three years, didn't need an introduction. In fact, he said he was "ecstatic" when he learned of Kleinschmidt's promotion. Former York star Will Sullivan had filled him in on Kleinschmidt's prior achievements.

"He's always trying to give me tips. The more he told me, the more success I had. I knew he would help me and the team more than any other coach," Cohn said. "I like everything he brings to the table. He knows when to have fun and when to be serious. He corrects the way you should be corrected.

"He knows how to get to certain players. He yells at some when he needs to. He puts his arm around others and tells them what they need to do. He knows what to say, the right thing to say to the right person.

"We'll surprise a lot of people this year. Kids are more excited about basketball in Elmhurst and what we can do once everybody buys into what the coach wants to do. We'll keep looking better and better."

Cohn still isn't sure what Kleinschmidt means when he refers to a Catholic League basketball player. Kleinschmidt's definition is "physical, black-and-blue, knock people on their behinds."

"But I think we'll buy into it," Cohn said. "If someone gets hit, we'll hit them back. It isn't what we are used to but the coach has done a great job in changing the culture.

"We really look up to him. He played basketball at the highest level in college. There are no negatives when you talk about him. I don't know if he works as hard as (legendary York cross-country coach) Joe Newton, who has 26 state titles. But he wants a state title as much as we do. He is a terrific coach and a basketball mind."

How's that for an endorsement? Talk about getting your players to buy into your philosophy, your system, your program, your way of doing things. And Kleinschmidt isn't even running for office. His latest example of salesmanship was ordering new uniforms for next year.

"I was a goal-setter when I was playing," Kleinschmidt said. "My immediate goal is to win the conference. Long-term, it is to win the state title. People look at me as though I'm crazy. Can I coach? I'm confident at what I'm doing. I feel I am prepared and organized. I feel I know what to run and when to run it. I'll be a gym rat as a coach, just as I was as a player, scouting and looking for an edge whenever I can get it."

Kleinschmidt retired from competition in 2008 at age 33. He loved playing but 12 years on the road was a hardship on his family, which remained in Chicago. He spent seven or eight months in Japan, then played in Italy or Venezuela. It added up to being on the road for 10 months a year for seven years. But after four surgeries on his knees and ankles, it was time to come home for good.

"I always knew I would coach. I just didn't know when or in what capacity," he said.

He returned to DePaul, completed work toward his degree, and interned with coach Jerry Wainwright. He served as Wainwright's director of basketball operations, then assistant coach. When Wainwright was fired, he joined coach Al Biancalana's staff at York. When Biancalana left for Illinois-Chicago, he assisted new coach Dominic Cannon. When Cannon left after one year, Kleinschmidt moved up.

"It's a great blessing, a great thing for me," Kleinschmidt said. "I'm still working with special education kids in school. I love working with kids, eight periods a day with autistic kids. I plan to get a master's degree in special education."

He also is getting a master's degree in basketball. He has learned from some of the best teachers in the game, including Wainwright, Biancalana, Dick Versace, Tony Barone, Jim Harrington, Bob Ociepka, Tracy Webster and Mike Bailey.

"Basketball is my life. When I was out of it, I wasn't a very happy man," he said. "Ex-players say that if you can play, you can coach. But that isn't true at all. You must be prepared and organized. It hasn't got anything to do with X's and O's."

On his first day of practice on Nov. 7, he set out to change the culture in a program that has known success over the years, dating to coach Dick Campbell in the 1960s, but has never advanced beyond the quarterfinals in the state tournament.

"We're going to be tough and physical," he told his players.

In the age of Google and the Internet, he figured they knew who he was, what his credentials as a player were, his glory days at Gordon Tech and DePaul. But there still were some things they didn't know.

"The other day, a player made a clean foul on a fast break. I said it was a 1990 Gordon Tech foul. The kid said: '1990?' It puts it all in perspective."

Kleinschmidt understands that he is only 38 years old but he still is dealing with 16, 17 and 18-year-old kids who had to look him up on Google. The game has changed. So have the teaching methods. And Kleinschmidt is the boss for the first time. To feel comfortable, he hired his 26-year-old brother David as his No. 1 assistant.

"My trademark? We're going to be a high IQ team," he said. "You can't have a system. You must adapt to what personnel you have. You have to make it work. We'll try to get up and down the floor. But you can't run a motion offense with five 6-8 guys. And we'll try to play good team defense, man-to-man. I'll puke if I have to play zone but I might have to with our size.

"College and pro basketball is cut-throat. But I have to remind myself that these are 16, 17 and 18-year-old kids. I must teach them. I can't go off on them. I can't expect them to know if I haven't taught it. I think I'm a good teacher.

"But I never had patience before. I lived in a fast-paced society. I wanted it now, worked hard and got it. But 17-year-old kids don't think like I do. I've got to explain it again and have more patience."

Kleinschmidt also knows how important leadership is on the court. And he believes he has one in Cohn.

"You need leaders," he said. "I felt I was a good leader and I was around a lot of good leaders. It's obvious when you don't have it. Now I know why we didn't win in some years was because we didn't have good leadership. It can happen in high school with parents in the crowd and with issues like playing time. Everybody has to be on the same page."

Kleinschmidt will build his first team around Cohn, 6-7 sophomore Frank Toohey and 6-4 senior Mike Despinich. Despite missing a few months with a broken wrist which limited his exposure on the summer AAU circuit, Cohn has received scholarship offers from Illinois-Chicago, Illinois State, Valparaiso, Drake and Colorado State and interest from Penn State and Nebraska. He anticipates more offers.

"My goal is to stay healthy this season. If I do, more scholarship offers will come," Cohn said. "I will play AAU with the Illinois Wolves in the spring, then make a decision in late May or early June."

Cohn insists he isn't a pure point guard, like Jason Kidd, someone who thinks pass first and shot second. "I have a score first mentality," said Cohn, who averaged 16 points per game as a sophomore for a 20-9 team that finished second in the West Suburban Silver and lost to De La Salle in the regional final.

"Some people refer to me as a combo guard. My best asset is scoring," he said. "I'm the kid who can make plays. I'm a playmaker. I love making others better as much as making myself look good. I'm the one who gets the flow of the offense going."

Sounds like he and his coach are on the same page.

White Sox reward for winning the offseason: They get to talk playoffs ... or bust

White Sox reward for winning the offseason: They get to talk playoffs ... or bust

The White Sox know there is no trophy for winning the offseason.

Make no mistake, they did win the offseason, Rick Hahn’s front office adding enough veteran cache to vault the 89-loss South Siders from just another rebuilding team with a bright future to a team whose future is pulling into the station.

But there was no self-congratulating at Hahn’s pre-SoxFest press conference Thursday.

“Quite candidly, we haven't accomplished anything yet, we haven't won yet,” he said. “This whole process was about winning championships, was about finishing with a parade at the end of October down Michigan Avenue. Until that happens, I don't think any of us are really in a position to feel satisfied or feel like we've accomplished anything.

“We've had a nice winter. We've had, frankly, in our opinion, a real nice three years since we started (the rebuild) with the Chris Sale trade. We think very bright days are ahead of us, and we look forward to enjoying them. But in terms of feeling like we've accomplished something or feeling satisfied, ask me after the parade.”

Give me a second while I email that last bit over to our marketing department. They might be able to conjure up a few things with “ask me after the parade.”

But in all seriousness, Hahn is right. There is no trophy for winning the offseason. The act of signing free agents does not balance out all the losing over the last three seasons. Only winning can do that.

There has been, however, a reward for winning the offseason. Rick Renteria — and presumably all his players this weekend during SoxFest — get to talk about playoff expectations. Real ones.

“I would be disappointed if we don’t make the postseason,” Renteria said during his own session Thursday. “We want to break through. We want this to be an impactful season.”

As recently as a year ago, no matter how bright the future appeared to be, that comment would have raised eyebrows. It would not have been taken seriously. Now? It is the expectation.

Renteria has not been shy about the rebuilding White Sox turning the corner in 2020. He spent the last few weeks of the 2019 campaign making similar postseason proclamations. But now Hahn has backed his manager up with all this winter’s acquisitions.

The White Sox place in the standings by the end of September still figures to have a lot more to do with Yoan Moncada and Lucas Giolito and Eloy Jimenez and Tim Anderson and Luis Robert than any of the individual newcomers, even players as talented and accomplished as Yasmani Grandal and Dallas Keuchel. The core is that important. But the outsiders brought in this offseason have embodied the turning tide — and given Renteria the chance to talk seriously about these kinds of big expectations for the first time in his tenure as the South Side skipper.

“I think, man for man,” he said, “now we at least have a little bit more ammunition to be able to go out and compete hopefully on a consistent basis and put those victories on the board.

“I’m not afraid of talking about high expectations and winning. … If we do our job and we go about preparing and hopefully the actions and performances come to fruition, we should be on top of the victory column in terms of wins and losses. And there’s nothing beyond my thought that doesn’t say that I expect us to compete and be in conversation for postseason play.”

Hahn isn’t quite as willing to declare the 2020 season “playoffs or bust” because he’s still got his eye on the long term, the same place it’s been throughout this rebuilding process. That next parade down Michigan Avenue is supposed to be merely the first.

And so while the White Sox can reap the rewards of Hahn’s offseason work in the form of preseason talk, he’ll bask in nothing more than setting up his team for that long-term postseason success.

“I think the expectations are understandably high, at least when you talk to Ricky or the coaches or any of the players or anyone in uniform. Their expectation is that this team is in a position to win in the 2020 season, which is exactly where all of us in the front office would want them to be,” he said. “That said, whether you're talking Jerry (Reinsdorf) or Kenny (Williams) or myself, the entire purpose of this rebuild was to put ourselves in a multi-year position to win multiple championships.

“So the progress that we make in any given offseason has to be viewed not just about what's going to happen in that upcoming season, but what position that puts us in toward accomplishing that long-term goal. We want to make sure that we are well positioned, once that window opens, to win as many championships as possible.

“When that window opens, we're going to find out together. I certainly think the players in uniform think it's going to happen come Opening Day of this year. Whether we're blessed with good health and continued progress from our young players, we're going to find out together.

“But we look at it, in the front office, from a multi-year perspective. The guys in uniform are going to do everything in their power to make it about now, which you've got to appreciate.”

That’s going to be the theme of this weekend, as White Sox fans descend on SoxFest with more excitement than they have in years. This is a White Sox team expected to reach October, and that hasn’t exactly been common, as evidenced by the franchise’s more than decade-long postseason drought.

Hahn can talk about putting the team in good position for 2021 and 2022 and 2023 and beyond all he wants. The fans are finally — and with good reason — thinking playoffs or bust for the upcoming season.

And the manager agrees.

“I see our club, and I want to go into this season thinking I don't want to miss an opportunity,” Renteria said. “That's my goal right now, not to miss this opportunity. Expectations bread opportunities. I'm not afraid of expectations because it breads opportunity. I want to attain and complete those tasks that I think our club is going to have a chance to be able to do.

“I'm not afraid to say it.”

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NBA Mock Draft 3.0: Workout season could be more important than ever

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USA TODAY

NBA Mock Draft 3.0: Workout season could be more important than ever

With Zion Williamson making his NBA regular season debut Wednesday night, we finally got a chance to see what a No. 1 overall draft pick is supposed to look like: an athletic and versatile skill set, with the chance to impact a franchise for years to come. 

2019 No. 2 overall pick Ja Morant also looks like a franchise-changing talent with his speed and playmaking ability, lifting Memphis into playoff contention.

So, which players will have that kind of impact in the 2020 draft?

Well, for now it’s almost impossible to say. James Wiseman, the 7-foot-1 Memphis center, dropped out of school after playing just three games because of an eligibility battle with the NCAA. His size and raw tools are intriguing, but at this point his offensive game is extremely limited.

Meanwhile, Lonzo Ball’s younger brother, LaMelo is sitting out the rest of the Australian professional league season while he rehabs from a foot injury, another Australian professional, R.J. Hampton, just returned from a hip injury and North Carolina’s combo guard Cole Anthony is getting ready to return from a knee injury to finish his one and done season. 

That’s left NBA talent evaluators scrambling in trying to figure out the top of the draft, with only Georgia’s Anthony Edwards healthy and available among the players projected as the possible No. 1 overall pick. 

So, as we get closer to the end of January, here’s a look at how teams could view the available talent, with the understanding that the draft order will change dramatically as NBA scouts and GMs get a look at how players perform in the most important games of the season still to come.

2020 NBA mock draft 3.0