Bears

Female fan interrupts NBA playoff game

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Female fan interrupts NBA playoff game

From Comcast SportsNet
DENVER (AP) -- The playoff game between the Los Angeles Lakers and Denver Nuggets was briefly interrupted when a female fan walked out on the court in the second quarter Sunday night. The woman, identified by police as Savannah McMillan-Christmas of Denver, walked several steps onto the court as Nuggets point guard Ty Lawson brought the ball past half-court. Officials blew the whistle to stop play with 1:10 left and McMillan-Christmas was escorted away by security. McMillan-Christmas was arrested for investigation of trespassing and taken to a detention facility for booking, said Denver police Det. Todd Erickson, part of the security detail at Pepsi Center. Erickson said he was at his post near the Denver bench when he spotted McMillan-Christmas stepping onto the floor near mid-court in front of startled Nuggets guard Andre Miller. "I happened to see her walk on to the court and I thought, Uh, oh,'" Erickson said. He hustled over to her and, with other security personnel, told her she had to go back to her seat. She responded by asking, "Where's Kenyon?" an apparent reference to former Nuggets player Kenyon Martin.

Bilal Nichols eyes an even bigger impact for Bears in 2019

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USA Today

Bilal Nichols eyes an even bigger impact for Bears in 2019

Even if Bilal Nichols repeated his 2018 performance in 2019, the Bears would be lauded for unearthing a solid rotational player with a fifth-round draft pick. But Nichols isn’t resting on his rookie accomplishments, and is aiming to be an even more impactful player on the Bears’ defensive line as he enters Year 2 in the NFL. 

“More consistent, more dominant,” Nichols said. “That’s the biggest thing for me right now.”

Nichols was a top-50 run defender in the NFL last year, as rated by Pro Football Focus — he made a “stop” on 8.7 percent of his run defense plays, ranking 44th in the league (PFF defines a “stop” as a play that constitutes a failure for the offense). For reference, Akiem Hicks ranked eighth at 13.3 percent, Eddie Goldman was 17th at 11.6 percent and Jonathan Bullard came in 40th at 9.1 percent. 

Nichols’ biggest “stop” came in the Bears’ narrow Week 3 win over the Arizona Cardinals, in which he dropped running back Chase Edmonds for a three-yard loss on a third-and-two play inside Bears territory just after the two-minute warning. While Nichols debuted a week earlier against the Seattle Seahawks and recorded a pressure of Russell Wilson, that play against the Cardinals was critical in an important victory for the Bears. It also proved to Nichols that what he was doing was beginning to work. 

“That was really a situation where I had cut it loose and went,” Nichols said. “I knew what i was doing on that play, I knew the possible things I could get from the offense and that was just a situation where I cut it loose and just played football. And I happened to make a big play. 

“I can’t wait to do that this year.” 

Nichols, as he was figuring out how to form a routine and study opponents in the NFL after making the jump from FCS-level Delaware, played a shade under a third of the Bears’ snaps last year as part of a rotation that proved critical to the team’s defensive success. Hicks played the most snaps (780), followed by Goldman (552) and Roy Robertson-Harris (353). Nichols (328) pushed Bullard (298) to the bottom of the rotation, which helped keep members of Jay Rodgers’ unit fresh and at their most effective when they were on the field. 

The Bears’ defensive line is arguably their best and deepest unit, one which can collapse pockets and stymie opposing run games (the latter of which is especially important, given the Minnesota Vikings and Detroit Lions’ renewed commitments to running the ball this year). Nichols was already a big part of it in 2018, and may be an even bigger part of it in 2019. 

“Last year, I was still trying to figure things out, still trying to figure the league out, figure myself out as a player,” Nichols said. “And now that I got everything figured out, I’m just able to go. I could just play and play fast and cut it loose.”

Bears announce 2019 training camp schedule, which features July 25 report date

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USA TODAY

Bears announce 2019 training camp schedule, which features July 25 report date

The Bears' potential run to Super Bowl 54 will begin in earnest on July 25.

Thursday, the Bears unveiled their 2019 training camp schedule, which will run from July 25-Aug. 11 at Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais. The team will hold nine open practices during camp, including eight in Bourbonnais from 7:30 a.m. to noon. The ninth open session is Bears Family Fest, which will take place at Soldier Field on Aug. 3 starting at 7 p.m.

Before heading off to Bourbonnais, though, the team will hold a "Return to Decatur" event from July 20-21 in Decatur. 2019 is the Bears' 100th season in the NFL and they played their first season as the Decatur Staleys in 1920. The team will announce details at a later date, though both general manager Ryan Pace and head coach Matt Nagy will hold their opening press conferences on July 21.

Admission to training camp is free, though fans must get tickets in advance at chicagobears.com/camp. Giveaways will be available to the first, 1,000 fans or while supplies last, according to the team. 

Check out the official training camp schedule:

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