Bulls

Frankie O: The case for Woody

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Frankie O: The case for Woody

By Frankie O
CSNChicago.com

In the first winter of the Great Cubs Experiment fans have been eagerly dissecting every move of the Epstein Regime. Im very surprisednot surprised at the reactions Ive been getting at the bar. This has been, so far, a nuke job of the roster and not surprising. After watching what transpired on the field last year, many are happy with that. Very happy. But at the same time, folks have to still pay top dollar to have a front row seat to the laying of the foundation for the end of 104 years, and counting, misery. Ive listened to many season ticket holders about their unhappiness with a lack of return in their investment. Fans want to be part of something good, but at what cost? Going to a game at Wrigley never gets old, but as weve watched in the last 2 Augusts and Septembers, decisions have been made to do other things.

As I look at the latest cash grab up north of the Green Bay Packers though, I begin to wonder. The Packers are having another of their stock offerings where fans have the ability to own a piece of paper, for 250. Whatever! Not to be too greedy, the Packers set an individual limit of 200. How nice! Someone can own 50,000 worth of paper, plus 25 shipping and handling, to show how dedicated they are to the cause. (I think Im more outraged at the 25 bucks. How much can it cost to put someones name on a piece of paper and mail it to them?) The demand has been so great that the team has added 30,000 more to the announced limit of 250,000. That would put the total of the offering at 70 million. And people from Philly are crazy?

I bring this up because, in my opinion, almost everyone is on board here with the transformation that is occurring and the Cubs faithful has been categorized as the most faithful in sports. Of course, the cynic in me cant help but point out that this is the offseason! Once the season starts, and the losses mount, they might be whistling a different tune. It rhymes with Lou. Life is always easy in Theory. Are Cubs fans going to be willing to keep on parting with their hard earned cash for the product they are watching on the field, when they understand they have no chance of competing? Theyre not from Wisconsin!

That is why I think that maybe the new bosses should throw the nostalgic masses a bone.

There are only a handful of Cubs who have captured the imagination of the fans the way Kerry Wood has. With his blazing fastball and quiet demeanor, he burst on the scene and achieved national stardom with his 20 strikeout game in 1998.

I remember that game, but for a different reason.

That spring training, the media was abuzz about the young flame-thrower. He was left off the opening day roster though and did not make his first appearance until April 12th. His first 3 starts were what you would expect of a rookie, 11 innings, never going more than 5 in earning a 1-2 record. Then in his 4th start at home against the St. Louis Cardinals, there was a flash of what made him the 4th overall pick of the 1995 amateur draft. Seven innings pitched, one run allowed and nine ks in an 8-3 win. I was hooked. The fastball! The curve! This kid was big-time! The following Tuesday night was a Harry Carays employee outing in the bleachers at Wrigley.

That would be Tuesday May 5, 1998. To say that we enjoyed a few beverages would be typical understatement on my part. After the game, it came to me that Wood was pitching the next afternoon. Discussing this with a friend at a local establishment, I argued that we had to go see him pitch since it was a day game, the weather was going to be iffy and it would be easy to get tickets. If he pitched like his previous outing, he was going to become the next big thing, and getting to see him would be much more difficult. My friend argued that in my euphoric state that he didnt see any way that I would be able to get up in time and come back into the city to go to the game. As my phone rang the next morning, repeatedly, I was furious that my friend was correct and that this was a game that I would be watching on the TV. Although, I did find time to pick up the phone during the last call I received to express my feelings about his being right in two succinct words. As I tortured myself on the treadmill, while watching the game, to get rid of the evil spirits that where inhabiting my body, the game I was watching was making me feel even sicker. Strikeout after strikeout, in the most dominating game I ever watched. I had to turn it off. I did however listen to the rest of the game on my way into work. 20 strikeouts, no walks and one UGH! Upon arriving, everyone at the restaurant was buzzing and there were three TV stations interviewing customers to get their reactions to one of the biggest days in Cubs history. Did you see it?! Did you see it?!! Yeah, I saw it, now leave me alone! Man, was I ticked-off. I was sure that something was going to happen, and I was right, now I was being mocked about it everywhere I turned. Oh well. At least I have a story to tell when I want people to laugh at me!

This was the beginning of Woods status of not just being another player. Although the progression of his career was not what everyone expected or predicted, due to injury or whatever else, he always maintained that status. He had an aura and a mystique to accompany that right arm.

Something I witnessed later that year forever endeared him to me. My father and brother were in town and we went to a Cubs game that was honoring Harry. We arrived inside Wrigley early so that we could get on the field to have a picture taken, because thats how I roll! My father and brother were wearing new Cubs hats that they had purchased on the way to the stadium. Waiting to get onto the field, we were sitting in the first row of seats almost behind home plate on the Cubs side of the field. At this time rookie-phenom Wood was doing some PR work with some bankers, throwing a ceremonial pitch and having his picture taken. In the meantime, a crowd of youngsters, including my brother, had gathered near the home plate entrance to the Cubs dugout in hopes of getting an autograph.

Upon completion of his work duties with the giddy bankers (Wood fever had caught the entire populace of Chicago) he stopped to oblige the youthful mass on his way into the dugout. My brother came back beaming with his new hat having a pretty cool autograph on it. One that was so cool that a Phillies fan wouldnt get a ton of grief for possessing it. The old man, realizing this point, decided that he would go over and get his signed too. It was comical watching Wood pass over my father time after time, to sign something for a kid. Understanding that it wasnt going to happen, my father backed out of the throng and started his way back. At this point a little guy in the group saw what was happening and told my father to hold on and give the hat to him. As soon as the kid got back in line it was signed. I love the fact that Wood signed for every kid there and wouldnt sign for an old dude who was a Phillies fan, not falling for the subterfuge of him holding a Cubs hat!

I never saw him in person until many years later. Just over a year ago as a matter of fact, at the after funeral reception at Harry Carays for Ron Santo. As he approached the bar, my work wife and I said hello and asked teasingly if he had signed a contract for the 2011 season. We asked knowing that he was a free-agent and everybody who was a fan of the Cubs, including the late Ronnie, would like to see him back in a Cubbies uniform. The sheepish smile he gave the two of us got us thinking, Wow, maybe he will be back. His signing was announced less than a week later and Jim Hendry said their conversation at the reception was where their talks to bring him back started.
But that wasnt hard to guess. He belongs here. The symmetry between him and the Cubs is undeniable.

By this time Id become a fan of his for another reason. I know hes not the only one, not even on his own team, but for purpose of this post, Ill focus on his charitable endeavors. I think because Ive watched him here since he was 20, and have watched him grow into manhood it really resonates.

I dont know when the point is that you get it but he certainly does. I know for myself it was when my children were born. Maybe not so coincidentally, once he got married and had children, Wood has become a charitable force. According to his website, his Kerry Wood Strike Zone Celebrity Bowling Tournament has raised over 2 million for Childrens Memorial Hospital and other Chicago charities. Upon his arrival with the Cubs last year, he and his wife launched The Wood Family Foundation, in which they hope to improve the lives of children in and around the Chicago area through children's charities. You look at the picture of him and his family in the foundation website and its everything that anyone would want in life. And by reading their comments throughout the website, you can feel their need to share their good fortune. The benefit that the Wood family is having on others is admirable and undeniable.

What I also would term as undeniable would be Kid Ks effect on this years Cubs roster. When I first moved here, the Cubs Cub was Mark Grace. Not only was he good, he seemed to do things the right way. A gamer. He was also an influence on the young Kerry Wood, imparting his years of baseball wisdom. I always perceived that hitters wanted nothing to do with pitchers and vice-versa, but these two are so cool, it seemed a natural fit, and you would see them together often.

With this years edition primed to be one of the youngest weve seen in a long time, it only makes sense that the veterans chosen to stay are the right ones. New manager Dale Sveums comments about the apathy he perceived in the Cubs dugout in years past as viewed from across the field is something that is no longer going to be accepted, by anyone, since we have been promised more. What some of the youngsters on the Cubs are going to need is a no-nonsense, modern day, Crash Davis, someone who can appreciate the ups and downs of playing in the Show, someone who knows how to successfully navigate all of the obstacles in playing for the Chicago Cubs.

No one disputes that this is going to take a while, the path of developing young talent always does. In the meantime though, their need to be leaders, on the team and in the field, veterans that have earned the trust of management and the ticket-buying public alike, to show the way forward.

As I read in the papers this week what I consider a game of chicken, I dont get it. I know the mantra for the Epstein lead management is not to pay for past performance, and I get this, if youre talking about A-Rod or Albert Pujols or Alfonso Soriano(!), but they all make mega-mega millions. Were talking here about a set-up reliever that ALL sides agree took less than market value to play here last year. Why not consider that when offering a 2 year deal for appropriate money that would benefit everyone involved. The Cubs are better with Kerry Wood here. Chicago is better with him here as well

Deadline passes as Bulls, Bobby Portis fail to reach agreement on contract extension

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USA TODAY

Deadline passes as Bulls, Bobby Portis fail to reach agreement on contract extension

The Bulls and Bobby Portis were unable to reach an agreement on a contract extension by today’s deadline, which will make the power forward a restricted free agent next offseason.

According to The Chicago Tribune’s K.C. Johnson, Portis’ agent Mark Bartelstein and Gar Forman had “lengthy face-to-face negotiations” on Monday prior to the deadline. The two sides weren’t able to come to an agreement.

The negotiations – and lack of a deal – come after a summer and training camp in which Portis continued to show progression. After beginning the preseason coming off the bench Portis quickly played his way into the starting lineup alongside rookie Wendell Carter Jr. Portis finished five preseason games averaging 17.0 points, 5.8 rebounds and 1.2 steals in just 22.4 minutes.

Portis, the 22nd pick of the 2015 NBA Draft, has seen his role increase each of his three seasons. He made a jump last season in Year 3, averaging 13.2 points and 6.8 rebounds in 22.5 minutes. He was one of three players, including DeMarcus Cousins and Kevin Love, to average 21 points, 10 rebounds and 1.5 3-pointers per 36 minutes.

Though the Bulls certainly had the room to sign Portis to an extension, there were obvious reasons on both sides to wait on a deal. For starters, the Bulls will still be able to match any deal Portis receives in free agency next July, much like what happened with Zach LaVine and the Sacramento Kings. The Bulls maintain their abundance of cap space for the 2019 offseason, when they’ll be able to offer a max contract to the top-tier free agents, and they get to see if Portis makes another jump.

For Portis, it’s a case of him betting on himself. If the Bulls came in with a number he wasn’t satisfied with – to help keep their max cap space – he now finds himself on a contract year playing for his next contract. Still only 23 years old, Portis should cash in in July.

Two players from Portis’ draft class were able to cash in. Pacers center Myles Turner signed a reported four-year, $80 million extension and Cavaliers forward Larry Nance Jr. agreed to a four-year, $45 million deal. Portis likely would have fallen somewhere in between those two deals had an agreement occurred.

The Bulls are hardly in an easy situation with Portis. Though they value the versatile power forward, Lauri Markkanen is entrenched at the position for the foreseeable future and the team just spent last year’s No. 7 overall pick on center Wendell Carter Jr. Portis realistically is stuck behind both those players, though he certainly has starting level NBA talent.

Drilling further down on Matt Nagy after Bears OT loss to Miami Dolphins

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USA TODAY

Drilling further down on Matt Nagy after Bears OT loss to Miami Dolphins

The 31-28 overtime Bears loss to the Miami Dolphins on Sunday had myriad authors on the Chicago side of the ledger. Quarterback Mitch Trubisky correctly assessed the defeat as a team loss, which is pretty much the case in any NFL loss, but particularly so in this case.

“Growing pains” only goes so far in explaining the variety of problems that befell all three Bears phases in the heat of south Florida. And while devastating mistakes are inevitable for young, inexperienced head coaches and players, it falls to those coaches and players to demonstrate that Sunday in Hard Rock Stadium was an anomaly.

Because after five 2018 games, it is not clear that the Miami missteps are indeed exceptions, on the parts of players or coaches, both in fact. Regardless of whether the fault lies with offense or defense (special teams get a pass; Sunday should never come down to Cody Parkey needing to make a field goal from 53 yards).

The Bears have gone into four 2018 fourth quarters with leads and lost two of those games. The late-game defensive collapses at Green Bay and Miami should suffice to put a sock in mentions of the ’85 Bears defense and the ’18 iteration in the same conversation.

And the fact that the Bears offense has not scored more than 7 points in any of the five 2018 fourth quarters says that more than just the defense lacks a consistent finishing kick.

Coaching not to lose?

There is a fourth “phase,” and not the one (fans) that Lovie Smith once cited. It is coaching, which is intricately interwoven with each of the three main units but is its own phase. How well this fourth phase performed in Miami is a matter of some hazy perspectives.

“I’m a big boy; I can handle criticism,” Nagy said Monday. “You talking about the 53-yard field goal? No, I’m fine with that. I have no issue at all with the criticism. That’s where people are? That’s their own opinion. I felt good with what we did and, shoot, we’re all in this thing together and I trust our guys.”

Beginning with relative minutiae: Two flags were thrown (one declined) in Miami for illegal formations, in both cases for leaving the right tackle uncovered. A delay-of-game penalty on a second-and-3 at the Miami 44, led to a punt when the offense only made up seven of the resulting eight yards. That sloppiness pointed to issues on the sideline rather than in the huddle.

On multiple occasions coach Matt Nagy strongly defended Trubisky during training camp when interceptions occurred, the coach considering those acceptable temporary losses in the greater quest for his quarterback learning to stay aggressive in learning his limits and capabilities.

Yet in more than one situation Sunday, it was Nagy who dialed back the aggressive edge that he’s spoken of seeking to install in his quarterback and team. It left at least a small question as to whether Nagy lacked confidence in himself or his quarterback or his team to deliver in a critical moment.

Did Nagy second-guess himself the morning after? “Nope.”

Shaky confidence?

Whether the Bears were properly prepared coming into Sunday was an issue. A team on a three-game high came out of an off week with its poorest first-half performance of the season.

But it is what happened, or didn’t happen, later that warrants the some scrutiny.

As in: Nagy’s playcalling with the game there for the winning – the overtime possession starting from the Chicago 20, needing only a field goal for a win.

The point is not second-guessing a specific call or calls, but rather what may be at work with Nagy’s overall thinking and propensities.

After a short, high-percentage throw to Trey Burton on first down, Nagy called five straight runs. The first two, runs of 19 and 15 yards by Jordan Howard, worked. Howard went out for a two-snap break, then was back for a final run on third-and-4, which failed, leaving the ball at the Miami 35, Nagy’s minimum for attempting a field goal.

Beyond the obvious conservatism, the overall put the Bears in position of not only needing to convert a 53-yard field goal, but also leaving the Dolphins with field position at their 43 if the kick missed, which it did, although NFL kickers convert from 50-plus yards at a rate approaching 62 percent.

“To me, that 35-yard line [was the minimum], a 53-yard field goal, I have ultimate trust in [kicker Cody Parkey] making that,” Nagy said. “But at the same time, every yard that you get brings the percentage up a little bit.

“We just hit a [19]-yard run, we just hit a 15-yard run, and then we had a couple more runs right behind that. That’s just the decision we ended up making. Now, [if] he makes that kick and we’re good. He doesn’t and it’s ‘could you get a little bit closer?’ It would have helped, but at the same time I think Cody would be the first to tell you that he knows he can make that.”

One problem: Were Nagy’s defense playing at the level it had in the three previous games, he could be excused for trusting his defense to deliver a stop even with the Miami starting point. But the Dolphins had pushed the defense backwards for 344 total yards over the prior six possessions. There should have been no reasonable expectation that the defense, which already had driven backward 74 yards before a fumble on the first overtime possession, would suddenly rise up for a stop.

Nagy’s tactics also hint a lack of convinced confidence that his quarterback and offense could pull off an aggressive, under-control possession at that point. Exactly what Nagy is likely to stay in-house. His offense had scored touchdowns on four of its first five possessions of the second half, when the Bears never punted.

But Trubisky had thrown an inexplicable interception from the Miami 13 and Tarik Cohen had lost a fumble at the Chicago 45 on the fourth-quarter possessions on either side of the final Bears touchdown. So by the time the overtime possession arrived, Nagy had seen turnovers by all three principle members of his backfield – Cohen, Howard and Trubisky.

Whatever his reasoning, Nagy flashed defensive in the face of questions on his calls – “You go ahead, you throw it and then [media] are here asking me why you took a sack” – a response loosely suggests that Nagy either cares what people think (unlikely) or that he was mad at himself and/or his players (more likely).

That Nagy alluded to Trubisky taking a sack recalls sacks that the quarterback has taken that cost his team yardage before a missed field goal (Arizona) and other sacks incurred trying to force a play. Nagy sidestepped a question as to whether he would play that situation differently at such time as when Trubisky and his offense are more mature.

An erudite non-answer answer.

Fatigue factor

Running back Tarik Cohen mentioned his own failure to deal sufficiently with fatigue in Sunday’s second half, mentioned it in connection with his lost fourth-quarter fumble. Whether fatigue being allowed to reach a red-line level falls on coaches or player is debatable; players owe coaches honest self-assessments, and coaches had balanced snaps reasonably well for Cohen (34) and Howard (36) for the game.

Cohen is a young player. Nagy and most of his staff are young, and heat-management is not usually at the top of game-planning sheets. The last time (1994) the Bears played a day game in Miami, Cohen was still a year away from being born and Howard was two weeks old. Trips to Tampa the past three years don’t qualify for carryover conditioning; besides, one of the three was in December, a second in November.

But in the absence of player restraint/moderation/discretion/whatever in the face of in-game physical decline, it falls to Bears staff to monitor conditioning. The clear fall-off by the defense was more than apparent in the form of ebbing effort, missed tackles and generally flagging performance.

“I want to say that I’m not sure that our training staff and sports science staff could have done a better job in that situation,” Nagy said. “It was absolutely phenomenal. They were unbelievable, with how they handled the hydration and the cramping with our players. It was unreal. And so, that’s a credit to them for being prepared and getting our guys right.

“That was a long game. And when you play an extra period, or extra quarter in that heat, that’s a lot. For our guys to do that, that’s another part of the challenge that they battled through and that was everybody collectively — not just the players, but our staff as well.”