Preps Talk

Giants players thrive in All-Star Game

814388.jpg

Giants players thrive in All-Star Game

From Comcast SportsNet
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) -- Melky Cabrera, Pablo Sandoval and Matt Cain helped the National League to a Giant blowout in the All-Star game. After all the talk about AL dominance during an offseason when Albert Pujols and Prince Fielder switched leagues, the NL romped to an 8-0 victory over the American League on Tuesday night. The World Series will start in the city of the NL champion for the third straight year. "It's a nice edge," the NL's Tony La Russa said after his final game as a manager. Flashing their bright orange spikes and booming bats, the San Francisco sluggers keyed a five-run blitz against Justin Verlander in the first inning. Cabrera homered and won the MVP award in the ballpark where he played last season, and Cain got the win in the NL's most-lopsided All-Star victory. "I didn't come to win an MVP. That's just a surprise," the former Royals outfielder said, his mother and grandmother next to him. "The same opportunity that Kansas City gave me last year is the same opportunity that San Francisco is giving me every day to showcase my talent." Chipper Jones singled in his final All-Star at-bat at age 40. Ryan Braun, an All-Star again after his drug suspension was overturned last winter, doubled, tripled and made a fine catch in the outfield to help give the NL its first three-game winning streak in two decades. Teen sensation Bryce Harper had a shaky All-Star debut with a walk, strikeout and missed catch. Fellow rookie Mike Trout, only 20, showed off his dynamic skills. Cain combined with Stephen Strasburg, R.A. Dickey, Aroldis Chapman and the rest of a lights-out staff on a six-hitter. The game was pretty much decided a few moments after it started. Sandoval hit the first bases-loaded triple in All-Star history off Verlander, who couldn't control his 100 mph heat. Cabrera singled and scored the first run, then hit a two-run homer against Matt Harrison in a three-run fourth. "I don't get many triples," said the slow-footed Sandoval, known as Kung Fu Panda. "We had some fun with that in the dugout." San Francisco fans, who made a late voting push to elect Sandoval and Cabrera to starting spots, might really appreciate the victory come October. The Giants are a half-game behind the first-place Dodgers in the NL West. Rafael Furcal also hit a three-bagger, making the NL the first league with three in an All-Star game. As the All-Stars returned to Kansas City for the first time since 1973, La Russa bid farewell to the national stage in the city where he played for his first major league team. Having retired after managing St. Louis to last year's World Series title, La Russa became just the fourth inactive manager to skipper an All-Star team and improved to 4-2. "Just lucky, like I've been 30 years," La Russa said. The NL boosted its advantage to 43-38-2 and won for just the third time in the 10 years the All-Star game has been used to determine home-field advantage in the World Series. La Russa's Cardinals benefited from last year's NL All-Star victory, with St. Louis winning Games 6 and 7 at home against Ron Washington's Texas Rangers. "It's very disappointing, because we're competitors and we want to win," said Washington, who lost for the second straight year. "They came out. They swung the bats. Once they got the lead, started bringing those arms in their hand, and they got the job done." Jones, retiring at the end of the season, also had one last All-Star moment, pinch hitting in the sixth and singling just past second baseman Ian Kinsler and into right field. Jones chuckled as the ball rolled through. La Russa asked Jones to address the team before the game and the Atlanta third baseman told players: "Whether you're 19 or 40, we are all equals here." "I am not going out losing my last one. So, you with me?" he added. At 19 the youngest position player in All-Star history, Harper had a shaky start when he entered in the fifth. The heralded rookie, wearing shiny gold shoes, didn't flash a Gold Glove and lost Mike Napoli's routine fly to left in the lights, allowing it to drop behind him for a single. Harper then caught Kinsler's bases-loaded flyball to end the inning, earning applause from the crowd of 40,933 at Kauffman Stadium, spruced up by a 250 million renovation that was completed three years ago. Harper tagged up on a long fly after his walk in the fifth, but got himself hung up in a rundown and tagged out. Trout, among a record five All-Star rookies, had a nice showing against two very different pitchers. The Angels outfielder singled and stole a base against Dickey's knuckleball, then drew a walk against Chapman and his 101 mph heat. "I'm going to remember this the rest of my life," Trout said. Cain pitched the 22nd perfect game in big league history last month. He didn't have to be perfect in this one, allowing one hit in two innings for the win. "For those guys to go out and score five runs in the first inning was definitely a little more relaxing for me," he said. "But I still tried to stay focused." Cain was followed by 10 relievers, with Jonathan Papelbon getting the last out with a runner on third base. Verlander had a puzzling outing. In games that count, he hasn't allowed five runs in an inning since April 2010, according to STATS LLC. He became the first All-Star to give up a five-spot since Houston's Roger Clemens in front of his hometown fans in 2004. "I know this game means something and you don't want to give up runs, but we're here for the fans," Verlander said. "I know the fans don't want to see me throw 90 and try to hit the corners." In a 35-pitch inning, he threw five pitches clocked at 100 mph and another at 101. "Hitting 100 in the first inning? Normally you see the guy throw 93, 94 in the first and then hit 100 in the eighth. We saw him hit 101," Yankees second baseman Robinson Cano said. "The funniest part was Fielder said to him, Hit 101' and the next pitch he hit 101. Is it that easy?" La Russa, usually serious and tense after games, was playful after his finale, chanting "Mel-ky! Mel-ky! Mel-ky!" as the MVP walked to the podium. "If you're trying to win one game, there's not a better manager out there," Braun said. "It's only fitting that he went out with a win." NOTES: The NL extended the AL's scoreless streak to 14 innings -- its longest drought since 1995-97. ... The NL won for just the sixth time in a quarter-century. ... The NL had last won three straight in 1994-96. ... It was the first All-Star shutout since the NL's 6-0 win in 1996 at Philadelphia. ... The Giants' Barry Bonds was MVP of the '73 game.

IHSA Preps Football AP Poll: Week 9

IHSA Preps Football AP Poll: Week 9

Here are the latest rankings of Illinois high school football teams in each class, according to an Associated Press panel of sportswriters:

Class 8A

No. Team W-L Pts Prv
1. Lincoln-Way East (9) 8-0 98 1
2. Maine South 7-1 87 2
3. Marist (1) 7-1 79 3
4. Oswego 8-0 74 4
5. Homewood-Flossmoor 7-1 60 5
6. Bolingbrook 7-1 43 7
7. Naperville Central 6-2 25 8
8. Warren 7-1 23 NR
9. Glenbard West 6-2 21 6
10. Hinsdale Central 6-2 15 10

Others receiving votes:  Oswego East 8, Oak Park-River Forest 5, Neuqua Valley 4, Edwardsville 3, Plainfield South 3, West Aurora 2.

Class 7A

No. Team W-L Pts Prv
1. Batavia (6) 8-0 102 1
2. Brother Rice (2) 8-0 96 2
3. East St. Louis (3) 6-2 81 3
4. Nazareth  7-1 77 T-4
5. Mt. Carmel 7-1 64 T-4
6. Simeon 8-0 63 6
7. Hononegah 8-0 43 7
8. Normal Community 7-1 31 8
9. Glenbard East 8-0 23 NR
10. St. Charles North 6-2 7 10

Others receiving votes: Rolling Meadows 6, Belleville West 4, Moline 4, Wheaton Warrenville South 2, Lincoln-Way West 1, Hoffman Estates 1.

Class 6A

No. Team W-L Pts Prv
1. Cary-Grove (7)  8-0 106 T-1
2. Richards (4) 8-0 102 T-1
3. Willowbrook 8-0 76 3
4. Phillips 6-2 73 5
5. Glenwood 8-0 62 6
6. Prairie Ridge 6-2 48 4
7. Niles Notre Dame 7-1 47 7
8. Normal West 7-1 38 8
9. DeKalb 7-1 33 9
10.  Providence 5-3 8 10


Others receiving votes: Sacred Heart-Griffin 8, Kenwood 3, Bloomington 1.

Class 5A

No. Team W-L Pts Prv
1. Washington (9) 8-0 107 1
2. Montini (1) 8-0 98 2
3. Sterling (1) 8-0 89 3
4.  Hillcrest 8-0 75 4
5.  Highland 8-0 63 5
6. Antioch 8-0 58 6
7. Decatur MacArthur 6-2 39 8
8. Metamora 7-1 31 7
9.  Payton 8-0 21 10
10.  Kaneland 6-2 14 NR

Others receiving votes: Marion 4, Sycamore 3, St. Francis 2, Carbondale 1.


Class 4A

No. Team W-L Pts Prv
1. IC Catholic (12) 8-0 147 1
2. Rochester (3) 7-1 136 2
3. Rockford Boylan 7-1 111 4
4. Taylorville 8-0 109 3
5. Cahokia 7-1 76 6
6.  Coal City 7-1 69 5
7.  Richmond-Burton 7-1 50 7
8. Columbia 7-1 48 8
9. Pontiac 7-1 42 9
10. Marengo 6-2 23 NR

Others receiving votes: Freeburg 4, Breese Mater Dei 3, Fairbury Prairie Central 3, Urban Prep Charter/Bronzeville 2, Herrin 1, Murphysboro 1.
 

Class 3A

No. Team W-L Pts Prv
1. Byron (6) 8-0 144 1
2. Bishop McNamara (7) 7-1 137 2
3. Carlinville (2) 8-0 130 3
4. Monticello (1) 8-0 125 4
5. Farmington 8-0 96 5
6. Williamsville 7-1 78 6
7. Lisle 8-0 55 7
8. Beardstown 7-1 44 9
9. West Frankfort 7-1 30 10
10. Paris 8-0 22 NR

Others receiving votes: Fairfield 9, Anna-Jonesboro 2, Monmouth-Roseville 2, North Boone 1, Rock Island Alleman 1, Vandalia 1, Breese Central 1, Dunbar 1, Elmwood-Brimfield 1.

Class 2A

No. Team W-L Pts Prv
1. Maroa-Forsyth (10) 8-0 145 1
2. Orion (4) 8-0 133 2
3. Decatur St. Teresa (1) 8-0 118 3
4. Sterling Newman 7-1 98 4
5. Eastland-Pearl City 8-0 93 5
6. Illini West (Carthage) 8-0 72 6
7. Pana  7-1 53 7
8. Hope Academy 6-2 51 8
9. Nashville 7-1 39 10
10. Eldorado 6-2 6 NR

Others receiving votes: Rockridge 5, Knoxville 4, Bismarck-Henning 4, Collins 2, Clifton Central 1, Mercer County 1


Class 1A

No. Team W-L Pts Prv
1. Gibson City-Melvin-Sibley (15) 8-0 168 1
2. Lena-Winslow 7-1 142 2
T-3. Tuscola 7-1 114 3
T-3. Princeville 8-0 114 T-4
5. Ottawa Marquette (1)  8-0 113 T-4
6. Camp Point Central 7-1 75 6
7. Argenta-Oreana 8-0 68 8
8. Concord (Triopia) 7-1 53 7
9. Milledgeville 8-0 39 9
10. Aurora Christian 5-3 19 10

Others receiving votes: Athens 10, Sesser-Valier 6, Madison 5, Fisher 4, Carrollton 2, Red Hill 2, Orr 1.

Film review: Albert Wilson's 75-yard TD shows how Sunday was an aberration for the Bears' defense

Film review: Albert Wilson's 75-yard TD shows how Sunday was an aberration for the Bears' defense

(For a bonus film review, check out the video above of Akiem Hicks' forced fumble on the one-yard line)

When Eddie Jackson didn’t stay on top shoulder of Randall Cobb in the fourth quarter of the Bears’ season opener, there was a clear coaching point from that 75-yard backbreaking touchdown. The Bears’ defensive mantra the week after was to focus on “plastering” receivers, which this defense did a good job of over the next three weeks. 

There surely are coaching points leveled by Vic Fangio and his assistants after the Bears were carved up by Brock Osweiler and the Miami Dolphins in Sunday’s 31-28 loss in Miami. But maybe the over-arching though here is this: The Bears didn’t, during the off week, go from being one of the league’s more sure-handed tackling teams to one of the worst. 

A defense that swarmed to the ball over the first four weeks looked a step slow and frequently out of position on Sunday. The more likely explanation for that development isn’t the plot to Space Jam 3, where a group of cartoon aliens steal the athletic power of an entire defense to use for their own. More likely, it was the heat in south Florida that sapped this team’s energy over the course of a long afternoon.

In this week’s film breakdown, we’re going to look at Albert Wilson’s 75-yard touchdown, which was wildly uncharacteristic of this defense. 

Image 1: the Bears are in nickel man coverage with Wilson (red circle) lined up in the slot across from Bryce Callahan. Danny Amendola goes in motion to the boundary (green arrow), with Danny Trevathan (green arrow) following him, though safety Adrian Amos will be the guy covering the Dolphins receiver. Akiem Hicks and Jonathan Bullard are the two down linemen in the interior, with Leonard Floyd rushing from the left and Khalil Mack from the right. 

Image 2: Mack is chipped by tight end Nick O’Leary (yellow circle), with Roquan Smith (yellow arrow) responsible or covering him. Trevathan (green circle) is in space with Amos (blue circle) picking up Amendola. With Mack chipped, the Bears have three pass rushers to go against five offensive linemen. 

Image 3: There’s about 10 yards of space between Mack and Osweiler (yellow arrow) after Mack comes free of O’Leary’s chip. Trevathan (green circle) is in a good position here, with Amos (blue arrow) closing on Amendola. Wilson works into space ahead of Callahan (red arrow), while both Dolphins outside pass-catchers run go routes to clear cornerbacks Kyle Fuller and Kevin Toliver II out of the play. 

Image 4: First, the white circle — Hicks had his helmet ripped off, with right tackle Jesse Davis the apparent culprit. He still manages a good pass rush against a double team that could’ve hit home, or forced Osweiler to Mack (who’s about five yards from Osweiler when the ball is released) or Floyd, had the play extended longer. Meanwhile, when the ball is released, Callahan (red arrow) and Trevathan (green arrow) are in good position to bring down Wilson, while Amos (blue arrow) is there for help if Wilson were to turn upfield to the far sideline. 

Image 5: Wilson catches the ball and goes to the far sideline, away from Callahan (red arrow) and toward Trevathan (green arrow). After O’Leary and Smith engaged, the rookie linebacker is the farthest back from the play of these three when the ball is caught. 

Image 6: Trevathan (green arrow) seems to over-commit, giving Wilson a lane toward the boundary to cut upfield. 

Image 7: Amos (blue arrow) still has a chance to bring down Wilson short of the sticks.

Image 8: Amos misses the tackle, and Trevathan is blocked by O’Leary. That leaves Jackson (yellow arrow) as the last guy who can stop Wilson from breaking this play open. 

Image 9: In missing the tackle, Amos tripped Wilson a bit, which Jackson admitted threw him off (“but that’s not an excuse for it,” he added). Wilson re-gains his balance, cuts inside, and Jackson whiffs on the tackle. 

“Probably just try to shoot my shot on the tackle instead of just guessing, just probably should have shot my shot,” Jackson said of what he felt he should’ve done differently. 

Wilson goes to the house, and the Dolphins tie the game one play after the Bears took the lead. The last image here is Wilson’s route chart from NFL Next Gen Stats, which shows just how much running he did after the catch on that play — yardage-wise, it was 71 yards, but by distance it was much further. 

“We talked about how many tackles we missed,” Jackson said. “Some of that could have really changed the momentum of the game if we would have made some of those tackles. Unfortunately, two of them resulted in big play touchdowns.”

No members of the Bears defense were willing to use the heat as an excuse, instead opting for thumb-pointing instead of blaming teammates, coaches or the sun. But there’s a good chance we look back at Week 6 in Week 10 or 11 and can say with some confidence that the Bears beat themselves more than the Dolphins did, and it’s something that hasn’t happened since. 

“We know we made mistakes, that don’t kill our confidence,” Jackson said. “That don’t kill our swagger. We know what we gotta do, we know what we gotta correct. So we come in here, we’re going to play Chicago Bears football that we’re used to playing.”