Bulls

Golson emerges as Notre Dame's championship quarterback

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Golson emerges as Notre Dame's championship quarterback

Everett Golson was Notre Dame's most impressive quarterback seven months ago, when Tommy Rees and Andrew Hendrix both threw interceptions in the team's spring game. But coach Brian Kelly still referred to Golson as a "heart attack for me," noting how the young quarterback struggled to read signals and get plays called in a timely manner.

When fall camp rolled around, it quickly became clear Golson was the favorite to beat out Andrew Hendrix for the starting nod. Despite having no experience at the collegiate level, Golson was going to be Notre Dame's quarterback. So did the redshirt freshman picture back in August the kind of season he and the Irish wound having?

"Nah, not at all," Golson laughed after Notre Dame's 22-13 win over USC Saturday. "I think I was getting frustrated too much to be envisioning that."

Early on, Golson didn't struggle statistically, completing 47 of 81 passes for 611 yards and two touchdowns. A year after Notre Dame's season was done in by a spate of early-season turnovers, Golson didn't throw an interception against Navy, Purdue and Michigan State.

But he wasn't comfortable in that stretch, and that led to Tommy Rees replacing him late in Notre Dame's win over Purdue. The Michigan game -- three completions in eight attempts for 30 yards with two bad interceptions -- was the culmination of Golson's September discomfort.

"I keep going back to Purdue week, talking about that game. It was a little bit a lot for me, to be honest," Golson said. "But seeing how Ive progressed now, with the help of coaches and the O-line being with me and the wide receivers and the running backs, and also the guys on the defensive side instilling that confidence, its helped me a lot."

Kelly stuck by his quarterback, reaffirming over and over that Golson was entrenched as Notre Dame's starter. Rees has slowly been phased out as a safety net, with Kelly saying prior to the USC game that Golson reached a point where he would play through any struggles.

The playbook has opened up for Golson, starting with some zone reads against Miami and progressing to deep balls and options as the weeks have wore on. But his development still has a ways to go, and Golson was quick to point out he still needs to work on red zone execution heading into the BCS Championship.

"Its been a learning process. Were still right in the midst of it, youre watching it," Kelly explained. "Hes making better decisions with the football. I guess the difference is hes not careless with the football. Careless I cant take. Hes going to make some bad decisions once in a while. But hes not careless with the football."

Few expected Notre Dame to be in the position they currently are, awaiting the winner of the SEC championship in Miami Jan. 7. But of all the teams with first-year starting quarterbacks, it's Notre Dame and Golson -- not Texas A&M and Johnny Manziel, not Oregon and Marcus Mariota -- that's going to the BCS Championship.

"It was a great feeling knowing everything you worked for in spring ball and everything you worked for in summer camp, it really kind of proved itself to be true and worthwhile," Golson said.

ESPN ranks Derrick Rose No. 36 in its World Fame 100 list

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AP

ESPN ranks Derrick Rose No. 36 in its World Fame 100 list

Yes, Derrick Rose Stans. Your boy still has plenty of relevance in the sports world.

ESPN released its third annual ranking of "the biggest names in sports," and the Timberwolves point guard ranked No. 36 on the list. ESPN formed the list based on a formula that took three factors into account:

1. Search score, "which measures how often a name is searched"

2. Endorsement dollars, with sources using ranging from Forbes to ESPN contributors

3. Social media followers, with ESPN taking only the platform in which the player had his or her most followers into account.

Rose's search score wasn't all that impressive, ranking 15 - the average on the top 100 list had a score of 35. But with Bulls fans, NBA fans and now of course Timberwolves fans chiming in on his game, Rose's name came across plenty of timelines and search engines.

Rose's $14 million in endorsements - primarily from that massive Adidas deal - was better than the average $12.6 million of the top 100 athletes.

Rose's top social media page is on Facebook, where he currently has more than 10.7 million likes. This, as ESPN notes, is largely due to the international following Rose and so many other NBA athletes have built up over the years.

In 2016, Rose ranked No. 30 on the list. In 2017 he was No. 33 on the list, so while he isn't trending in the right direction there's no denying his presence in the sports landscape. Love him or hate him, Derrick Rose still matters.

The only NBA players above Rose on the list were LeBron James (No. 2), Kevin Durant (No. 7), Stephen Curry (No. 9), James Harden (No. 24), Kyrie Irving (No. 27), Dwyane Wade (No. 31) and Russell Westbrook (No. 34). NBA players below Rose included Carmelo Anthony, Damian Lillard, Chris Paul, Blake Griffin, Isaiah Thomas, and Cameron Payne.

OK, not Cameron Payne. He must have been No. 101.

Tarik Cohen was NFL's best big-play RB in 2017

Tarik Cohen was NFL's best big-play RB in 2017

Tarik Cohen's rookie season with the Chicago Bears was an impressive blend of running, receiving and special teams play. He quickly became a household name. The combination of his diminutive frame and oversized personality made him a fan favorite, especially when he started gaining yards in chunks.

In fact, of all running backs with a minimum of 80 carries last season, Cohen had the highest percentage of runs that were 15 or more yards, according to Pro Football Focus.

Cohen will have a big role in new coach Matt Nagy's offense this season because of everything he offers a play-caller. He's a weapon as a receiver out of the backfield and can chew up yards on the ground like any traditional running back. He's a hold-your-breath talent who can turn a bad play into a touchdown in the blink of an eye.

Cohen had 370 rushing yards, 353 receiving yards and three offensive touchdowns in what can be described as a limited role last year. John Fox and Dowell Loggains didn't seem to ever figure out how to best use Cohen's skill set. That should be no issue for Nagy and Mark Helfrich, the team's new offensive coordinator, who both bring a creative offensive approach to Chicago.

Jordan Howard will be the starter and will do most of the heavy lifting. But Cohen is going to have a much bigger role than he had as a rookie, and that should result in more big plays and points on the board.