White Sox

High School Hoops 101: Meet the top players

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High School Hoops 101: Meet the top players

Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2010
9:07 PM
By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.comChristmas came early for several college basketball programs a few weeks ago, as high school seniors across the nation signed national letters of intent with various universities. Illinois, particularly the Chicagoland area, was no exception, as many of the nation's top prospects reside in the region.As Duke assistant coach and former player Chris Collins (the son of Philadelphia 76ers head coach and former Bulls coach Doug Collins), who starred at Glenbrook North High School, told CSNChicago.com, "I'm biased because I'm from there, but I always think it's the best city for basketball. You get players, year in and year out, that are really talented. They also are tough-minded players. I think that's why you see so many guys make it at the college level and then go on and even make it at the pro level. I don't think that well is going to run dry. I think you're going to continue to see Chicago producing a lot of great players."Here's a look at just a few of the state's top players in the class of 2011 (in no particular order), as well as a handful of very promising underclassmen and some of the top prep squads in and around the Windy City:Class of 2011:Tracy Abrams, 6-foot-1 point guard, Mount Carmel, Illinois: Abrams isn't the flashiest player you'll come across; rather, he embodies a classic old school Chicago guard with his toughness and winning mentality. An impact player since the beginning of his high school career--his early commitment to Illinois is regarded as getting the ball rolling for Bruce Weber's loaded recruiting class--Abrams is a perfect fit for the Big Ten with his leadership, physical nature, ability to get tough buckets and lock down opposing guards.Bruce Barron, 6-foot-3 point guard, Brehm Prep, Oregon: Since he attends school in downstate Carbondale, many in Chicago haven't had a chance to see this underrated prospect in person, but believe this: Barron has a chance to be a force in the Pac-10 and lead Oregon back to prominence after a few down years. A power point guard with strong penetration skills, Barron often bullies his foes on both ends of the floor, is able to help out on the glass, has solid court vision and can keep the defense honest from the perimeter.Ryan Boatright, 5-foot-10 point guard, East Aurora, Connecticut: Some observers may question Boatright's size--and the nature of his recruitment; he committed to USC and former Bulls coach Tim Floyd in the eighth grade, changed his mind, then committed to West Virginia this fall before again backing out--but there's no doubt the diminutive speedster has skills. Adept at scoring the ball in transition, from the outside and in traffic using his athleticism and shot-making ability, Boatright showed on the summer AAU and camp circuit that he's also capable of distributing the ball at a high level.Wayne Blackshear, 6-foot-5 shooting guard, Morgan Park, Louisville: After a dominant season in which he led his new school to a city championship, Blackshear more than justified the hype he received as a younger prospect. A smooth, powerful and explosive swingman, Blackshear has a pro prototype body to go along with his potential, which should serve him well playing for former NBA head coach Rick Pitino on a squad where he should be able to come in and produce right away in a year.Anthony Davis, 6-foot-10 power forward, Perspectives Charter, Kentucky: Unknown a year ago, Davis has one of the most remarkable stories one will ever hear in these days of overexposure, as he went from an anonymous 6-foot-2 guard playing for a charter school in the Chicago Public League's "Blue" division to arguably the best prospect in the nation. Davis retained his guard skills and is capable of handling the ball, knocking down outside jumpers and even being a playmaker, but his athleticism and quickness serve him best on the defensive end, where his versatility allows him to guard multiple positions, own the boards and be an intimidating shot-blocker.Nnanna Egwu, 6-foot-10 center, St. Ignatius, Illinois: Once considered a project, Egwu is still a work in progress, but has realized his potential enough to be considered one of the better big men in the country. A true center, the sparkling student was beset by injuries this summer, but his strong fundamentals in the post, shot-blocking prowess, ability to run the floor, developing post moves and rebounding effort mean his best days are still yet to come.Mychael Henry, 6-foot-6 shooting guard, Orr, Illinois: Another under the radar talent until recently, this talented sharpshooter went from a mid-major prospect to a highly-coveted national recruit after exploding onto the scene with a huge season last winter. Henry possesses a college-ready body and athleticism, but while his deep range and accuracy have won him acclaim, he's also willing and able to do the dirty work inside, as well as contribute in other ways with his underrated all-around game.Chasson Randle, 6-foot-2 point guard, Rock Island, Stanford: Since Rock Island falls outside of Chicagoland, some local hoops fanatics have doubted whether Randle--who is also a top-notch student, a major reason he signed with the academic power--is truly an elite player, but despite not hailing from the big city, the small-town kid has a major-league game. Equally capable of running the show or going on prolific scoring outbursts, Randle is fundamentally sound, owns a pure shooting stroke and is an excellent playmaker.Mike Shaw, 6-foot-8 power forward, De La Salle, Illinois: The versatile Shaw has been a hot commodity since entering high school and outside of Davis and possibly Boatright, endured probably the most high-profile recruitment process of the bunch. While he possesses a nice finesse game--he can handle the ball, operate on the perimeter, set up teammates with his passing skills and hit mid-range jumpers--Shaw is also a rugged rebounder, good defender and can score around the bucket with his athleticism.Sam Thompson, 6-foot-7 small forward, Whitney Young, Ohio State: The best athlete in the group (and another high-level academic prospect), Thompson is still developing his complete game, but already has a lot of tools to work with. An elite defender--whether one-on-one defense, blocking shots with his long wingspan or playing the passing lanes--he's a high-flying slasher who can finish above the rim with ease and has made big strides as a ballhandler and outside shooter.Class of 2012:Aaric Armstead, 6-foot-5 small forward, Hales Franciscan: A big-time athlete, Armstead is still a bit raw, but his high motor, transition scoring ability, slashing skills, versatile defense and improving perimeter game have put him high demand.Aaron Simpson: 5-foot-11 point guard, North Chicago: Though undersized for a scorer, Simpson can light up the scoreboard with the best of them, but he proved over the summer that he can also facilitate offense as a floor general.Jay Simpson, 6-foot-8 power forward, Champaign Central: An early Purdue commitment despite being just a stone's throw from Illinois, this Simpson is a fundamentally-sound power forward who can step out to make jumpers, score in the low post and get physical on the glass.Stevie Taylor, 6-foot-8 power forward, Simeon: Considered the top player by some in what is politely termed a "mid-major class," Taylor is a rapidly-developing interior athlete who makes plays with his athleticism, high activity level, willingness to bang in the paint, rebounding ability and defensive acumen.Tim Williams, 6-foot-7 power forward, Homewood-Flossmoor: A versatile player still in the process of putting it all together, Williams is capable of playing on the block or on the perimeter, as he can handle the ball well for his size and make open jumpers, as well as hit the boards and finish around the rim.Sleeper: Derrick Randolph, 5-foot-6 point guard, Whitney Young; Don't let the size fool you: Randolph is as tough as they come, using his explosive quickness to put extreme pressure on opposing ballhandlers and getting into the lane to set up his teammates.
Class of 2013:Alex Foster, 6-foot-7 power forward, De La Salle: Foster is already able to make an impact on the game with his size, strength, athleticism, rebounding ability and defensive prowess, all of which complement his still-developing offense.Tommy Hamilton, 6-foot-9 power forward, Whitney Young: A load on the inside, Hamilton is surprisingly nimble for his frame (just like his father, 7-foot-4 former Chicago schoolboy star and NBA journeyman Thomas Hamilton), possesses a nice touch out to three-point range, has shocking ballhandling and passing ability, is a beast on the boards and has advanced post moves.Kendrick Nunn, 6-2 shooting guard, Simeon: Nunn didn't see much time on last year's state-championship squad, but the athletic scorer appears ready to make an impact after a big summer that showcased his relentless slashing ability and improved long-range shooting.Jabari Parker, 6-foot-7 small forward, Simeon: The consensus top prospect in what many expect to be the next big class in Illinois, Parker (the son of former Golden State Warriors star Sonny Parker) is incredibly skilled and polished, and is now ready to be Simeon's go-to guy after helping lead the team to a state championship as a freshman starter, something not even Bulls star Derrick Rose did.Jaylon Tate, 6-foot-1 point guard, De La Salle: Thrown into the fire last season, Tate kept getting better as the season went on, using his length, solid ballhandling, knowledge of the game and impressive defense to hold his own with the big boys.Sleeper: Markee Williams, 5-foot-10 point guard, Morgan Park: As a freshman, Williams demonstrated poise beyond his years in helping Blackshear lead Morgan Park to the city title, using his advanced playmaking ability, high basketball I.Q. and ability to thrive in the clutch.Class of 2014:Jahlil Okafor, 6-foot-9 center, Whitney Young: DePaul offered the youngster a scholarship when he was in the eighth grade, but that was just the tip of the iceberg, as Okafor (reportedly a distant relative of the New Orleans Hornets center Emeka Okafor) is considered one of the elite players in his class and should team with Hamilton to make a near-unstoppable inside duo over the next three years.Paul White, 6-foot-6 small forward, Whitney Young: Okafor gets most of the attention, but White--described as a "point forward" type--isn't far behind, as his upside and current talent level could have him seeing big minutes as a freshman on a deep squad.Malik Yarbrough, 6-foot-4 small forward, Zion-Benton:Yarbrough is a talented, physical and versatile wing who should pick up for Ohio State freshman Lenzelle Smith as the next do-it-all star for Zion-Benton.Sleeper: Larry Austin,6-foot-1 point guard, Lanphier: Austin isn't really a sleeper, but he's an unfamiliar name to some in Chicago, although high school basketball fans in the state should soon be hearing a lot more about the big star from Philadelphia 76ers swingman Andre Iguodala's alma mater in Springfield.Teams:De La Salle: With all of its young prospects a year older, the return of versatile 6-foot-6 senior transfer Dre Henley (the mid-major recruit was at Brehm last season) and Shaw as the squad's centerpiece, the stage is set for a run to Peoria.Morgan Park: Now in the 3A class, the road just got a lot easier for Blackshear, 6-foot-4 sharpshooter and Illinois-Chicago recruit Jerome Brown and coach Nick Irvin's cast of talented youngsters.Orr: With Henry, talented 6-foot-1 junior guard Curtis Jones and some underrated role players, this once-dormant Public League program is now the hunted instead of the hunter.Simeon: Although they lost some key seniors, the defending state champs are once again loaded, and having a potential superstar in Parker to go with their trademark tough defense, it wouldn't be surprising to see them repeat.Whitney Young: Perhaps the most talented team in the state--as usual, it seems--the loss of some high-major seniors will hurt, but if Thompson steps up to the plate as a leader, the chemistry is right and the underclassmen get better over the course of the season, anything less than a title will be considered underachieving.Sleeper: Benet Academy: After a breakout season last year, the school is firmly on the map as a force to be reckoned with behind point guard and
Northwestern signee David Sobolewski and Frank Kaminsky, a skilled, 6-foot-10 Wisconsin-bound big manColleges:DePaul: New head coach Oliver Purnell is fighting an uphill battle with a downtrodden Blue Demons program, but signing two extremely athletic wings in locals Macari Brooks and Jamie Crockett will help with the school's image in the city. While those two are considered solid pieces to the puzzle, DePaul didn't snag any big fish in the area, although they did add highly-regarded Florida point guard Shane Larkin, the son of former Cincinnati Reds shortstop Barry Larkin, as well as big men Braeden Anderson and Derrell Robertson, from Canada and Mississippi, respectively.Illinois: After reigning in a stellar recruiting class the previous year, Illinois head coach Bruce Weber did it again, this time getting four city kids and national recruits to stay in-state. With the amount of talent on the roster the Illini will have by the time this class gets to Champaign, Weber's problem will be finding enough minutes for his talent--something every coach wishes they had to deal with.Northwestern: The additions of Sobolewski, a pure floor general, and versatile 6-foot-8 University of Chicago Lab School forward Mike Turner helps Northwestern continue to make inroads with their recruiting in the city. The Wildcats also brought in Tre Demps, a heavily-recruited point guard from San Antonio and the son of New Orleans general manager Dell Demps.Sleeper: Illinois-Chicago: New head coach Howard Moore was able to sign two city prospects--Simeon forward Ahman Fells and Curie guard Greg Travis--but two out-of-towners, Dallas guard Marc Brown (who had previously committed to Florida State) and 6-foot-10 big man Will Simonton out of Virginia, may be the impact players needed to make the program a Horizon League contender again.

Avi Garcia's played in fewer than 20 games since April, but could he still attract trade-deadline suitors?

Avi Garcia's played in fewer than 20 games since April, but could he still attract trade-deadline suitors?

Avisail Garcia returned from his latest disabled-list stint with a bang, smacking a three-run home run in the fourth inning Saturday in Seattle.

The White Sox right fielder hasn't even played in 20 games since late April, when he went on his first DL trip, which lasted two months. A second, also featuring an injury to his hamstring, made it two weeks between games.

But when he has been able to step to the plate this summer, Garcia has been tremendously productive. He came into Saturday night with a .333/.347/.783 slash line and a whopping eight home runs in the 17 games he played in between his two DL stays. Then he added that homer Saturday night off longtime Mariners ace Felix Hernandez, giving him nine homers in his last 14 games.

Keeping this up could do an awful lot of things for Garcia: It could make his ice-cold start a distant memory, it could prove that last year's All-Star season might not have been a fluke, and it could keep him entrenched in the conversation about the White Sox outfield of the future, giving the team one of those good problems to have when deciding how he would fit into the puzzle alongside top prospects like Eloy Jimenez and Luis Robert.

But here's another possibility: Has Garcia swung a hot enough bat in his limited action that he could be a trade candidate before this month runs out?

The White Sox don't figure to have too many players who are going to get contending teams worked up into a lather. James Shields, Joakim Soria, Luis Avilan, Xavier Cedeno. Those guys could classify as additions that would bolster teams' depth, but they might not be the attractive upgrades the White Sox were able to trade away last summer.

Garcia, though, could be. He might not slide into the middle of the order for too many contenders, but someone looking for a starting corner outfielder might be enticed by the kind of numbers Garcia has put up in June and July, albeit in a small sample size. Teams would also have to consider his health. He's already been to the disabled list twice this season. Teams would certainly have to be confident he wouldn't return in order to make a deal.

On the White Sox end, Garcia would figure to fetch a far more intriguing return package than the aforementioned pitchers, given that he's still pretty young (27) with one more season of team control after this one.

The White Sox have plenty of options when it comes to Garcia. They could deal him now, deal him later or keep as a part of the rebuild, extending him and making him a featured player on the next contending team on the South Side. But with a lot of significant injuries this year perhaps having an effect on when all those highly rated prospects will finally arrive in the majors — not to mention the disappointing win-loss numbers the big league team has put up this season — perhaps it would make more sense to acquire some rebuild-bolstering pieces.

Of course, it all depends on if there are any deals to be made. Do other teams' front offices like what they've seen from Garcia in this short stretch as much as White Sox fans have? We'll know by the time August rolls around.

Cubs fight back after Javy Baez ejection: 'We're not animals'

Cubs fight back after Javy Baez ejection: 'We're not animals'

If baseball wants stars that transcend the game, they need guys like Javy Baez on the field MORE, not less.

That whole debate and baseball's marketing campaign isn't the issue the Cubs took exception with, but it's still a fair point on a nationally-televised Saturday night game between the Cubs and Cardinals at Wrigley Field.

Baez was ejected from the game in the bottom of the fifth inning when he threw his bat and helmet in frustration at home plate umpire Will Little's call that the Cubs second baseman did NOT check his swing and, in fact, went around. 

Baez was initially upset that Little made the call himself instead of deferring to first base umpire Ted Barrett for a better view. But as things escalated, Baez threw his bat and helmet and was promptly thrown out of the game by Little.

"I don't think I said anything to disrespect anything or anyone," Baez said after the Cubs' 6-3 loss. "It was a pretty close call. I only asked for him to check the umpire at first and he didn't say anything.

"I threw my helmet and he just threw me out from there. I mean, no reason. I guess for my helmet, but that doesn't have anything to do with him."

Baez and the Cubs would've rather Little check with the umpire who had a better view down the line, but that wasn't even the main point of contention. It was how quickly Little escalated to ejection.

"We're all human," Baez said. "One way or the other, it was gonna be the wrong [call] for one of the teams.

"My message? We're not animals. Sometimes we ask where was a pitch or if it was a strike and it's not always offending them. I think we can talk things out. But I don't think there was anything there to be ejected."

Upon seeing his second baseman and cleanup hitter ejected in the middle of a 1-0 game against a division rival, Joe Maddon immediately got fired up and in Little's face in a hurry.

Maddon was later ejected, as well, and admitted after the game he was never going to leave the field unless he was tossed for protecting his guy.

"He had no reason to kick him out," Maddon said. "He didn't say anything to him. I mean, I watched the video. If you throw stuff, that's a fine. That's fineable. Fine him. That's what I said — fine him — but you cannot kick him out right there.

"He did nothing to be kicked out of that game. He did throw his stuff, whatever, but he did not say anything derogatory towards the umpire.

"...You don't kick Javy out. If he gets in your face and is obnoxious or belligerent or whatever, but he did not. He turned his back to him. That needs to be addressed, on both ends."

Maddon and the Cubs really want Major League Baseball to get involved in this situation. 

There are many other layers to the issue, including veteran Ben Zobrist having to come into the game as Baez's replacement. Maddon was not keen on using the 37-year-old Zobrist for 1.5 games during Saturday's doubleheader and now feels like he has to rest the veteran Sunday to lessen the wear and tear of a difficult stretch for the team.

There's also the matter of the groundball basehit in the eighth inning that tied the game — a seeing-eye single that just got past Zobrist as he dove to his left. It tied the game at 3 and the Cardinals took the lead for good the following inning.

Does Baez make that same play if he were out there instead of Zobrist? It's certainly possible.

"The dynamic of our defense was lessened by [the ejection]," Maddon said. "Again, listen, if it's deserved, I'm good. It was not. They don't need me out there, we need Javy out there.

"And it surprised me. I stand by what I'm saying. It was inappropriate. MLB needs to say something to us that it was inappropriate because it was and it could've led to the loss of that game."